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Old 03-06-2009, 08:33 AM
 
157 posts, read 273,514 times
Reputation: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHG722 View Post
Rankings are irrelevant, and even though I no longer attend BU, it's still not 26 spots worse than BC. And as a foreigner, you should be partial to BU, since BC is about as diverse as a package of Wonderbread.
---I'm currently doing my undergrad/master in Huge State University, and now I want a different taste, say a smaller private school, with less diversity population, if you can imagine what I'm saying. But I still think ranking is very important, don't H/P/Y/S always rank top? dont you think that means something??



Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
And....I made the comment about MIT grads attending Harvard for grad school. Not all MIT students attend Harvard for grad school,
i know top programs usually don't admit their own undergrads, but what is it with MIT grads going Harvard? why not Princeton/Yale/Columbia? I mean they are def comparable to Harvard and also Ivies

 
Old 03-06-2009, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Wynnewood, PA/Philadelphia, PA (Temple U)
2,784 posts, read 4,359,007 times
Reputation: 819
Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Don't you think that it is ridiculous to attribute the success of a schools hockey team to that schools overall strength? Yeah, Chuck's University is better than Yale because Chuck's football team has been undefeated for the last for the last decade. Sorry but college ball has nothing to do with a schools education.
Hockey does not involve the use of a ball.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoo_x View Post
---I'm currently doing my undergrad/master in Huge State University, and now I want a different taste, say a smaller private school, with less diversity population, if you can imagine what I'm saying. But I still think ranking is very important, don't H/P/Y/S always rank top? dont you think that means something??
I dont think it means a thing.
 
Old 03-06-2009, 02:08 PM
 
13,779 posts, read 16,628,621 times
Reputation: 7234
If hairs are going to be split, the term Ivy League was penned in order to describe the athletic conference of the eight northeastern schools and never had anything to do with their academics, so perhaps the athletics do play a role. From an academic standpoint they mean nothing.
 
Old 03-06-2009, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,480 posts, read 2,860,853 times
Reputation: 1359
I imagine the Ivy schools are better because they are more selective. Regardless of the quality of the professors, I can't help but feel like my state university professors have to dumb it down a bit to keep the class from getting lost. When you have the brightest, most studious students in the country the professors can challenge the class with more material.
 
Old 03-06-2009, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
7,388 posts, read 14,156,837 times
Reputation: 4555
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoo_x View Post
i know top programs usually don't admit their own undergrads, but what is it with MIT grads going Harvard? why not Princeton/Yale/Columbia? I mean they are def comparable to Harvard and also Ivies
My guess is that it is because they are both in Cambridge, but then again there are about 70 colleges in the Boston area, so I dunno.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JHG722 View Post
Hockey does not involve the use of a ball.
No s*** sherlock. College ball is a generic umbrella used to describe the major college sports as a whole.
 
Old 03-06-2009, 02:35 PM
 
Location: San Diego
2,518 posts, read 803,728 times
Reputation: 1298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I once heard a stand up comedian joke about why people think Ivy league schools are supposed to be better than other colleges. He asked are non Ivy league schools holding back on knowledge that can only be gotten at Harvard or Yale? Like if a student asks a certain question about physics at Ohio State the professor goes:

"Well you'll gonna have to go to Princeton to get your answer to that. Here at Ohio State we can only reveal so much".

Anyway,what's your take on this?
That's funny...

Being someone who went to an Ivy-feeder prep school (150 of the 330 in my class went to Ivy League schools, an additional 75 went to MIT/CalTech/Stanford) the main advantage of an Ivy is just the fact that you're surrounded by incredibly bright and motivated people. The myth of Harvard being filled with legacies is very dated, as many legacies with good scores get turned down. On top of that is the incredible amount of resources at Penn, Princeton or Yale in comparison to San Diego State, Rice or Gonzaga. The endowments are incredibly high, generally over $10,000,000,000 and that allows a lot of incredible things to be available to the students.

Finally, the professors at Ivys are "GENERALLY" better because you can't get a job as an Ivy League professor without a lot of qualifications, publications and a reputation.

For the record, I was someone who DIDN'T get into Ivy League schools, but was given scholarship offers to all those Ivy wannabes in the South (Tulane, Rice, Emory, Wake Forest). High SATs but mediocre grades will do that for you...

The top schools are the top schools for a reason, and it's a self-perpetuating process as well. The best and brightest go there, they get the best jobs...the next generation sees which schools get people the best jobs, they see that Penn is better than Drexel, so they all compete to go to Penn, the best and brightest are the ones who get in. How can the Ivy League schools not be the best when all the best students (who don't want to go to MIT, CalTech, Cooper Union or Stanford) fight over who gets to go there while all the mediocre ones look elsewhere?
 
Old 03-06-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: San Diego
2,518 posts, read 803,728 times
Reputation: 1298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastern Roamer View Post
I imagine the Ivy schools are better because they are more selective. Regardless of the quality of the professors, I can't help but feel like my state university professors have to dumb it down a bit to keep the class from getting lost. When you have the brightest, most studious students in the country the professors can challenge the class with more material.
This is exactly why I said "Thanks, but no thanks" to Pepperdine. I went to a physics class (granted, I took physics at my prep school, one that's equivalent to Harvard in prestige) and found myself, a 12th grader, telling Pre-med students how to do the experiments and what they meant. I went to an English class and their discussions were a lot less deep than the ones for the same book in 10th grade. When I see what passes for "A" work at San Diego State, I am appalled. Kids can come out of that (mediocre, at best) school without even knowing the difference between YOUR and YOU'RE...something I learned in elementary school. The lower the quality of the incoming freshmen, the lower the quality of the education.

I went from private to public school in 7th grade and saw the difference immediately. I was sleeping in class, talking back to the teacher and still getting the highest grades in the class by a mile. I got 112% in Math class...that shouldn't happen, a class should never be that easy for a 7th grader. After four years, I grew frustrated with the lack of quality in the public high school I went to (supposedly one of the top 50 in California) so I looked at the New England Prep Schools. When I went, I discovered how much better the education was at a high school with a $1,000,000,000 endowment and nothing but the best and brightest students in comparison to a public school with double-wide trailers in the parking lots masquerading as classrooms.
 
Old 03-06-2009, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
7,388 posts, read 14,156,837 times
Reputation: 4555
Quote:
Originally Posted by leftydan6 View Post
That's funny...

Being someone who went to an Ivy-feeder prep school (150 of the 330 in my class went to Ivy League schools, an additional 75 went to MIT/CalTech/Stanford) the main advantage of an Ivy is just the fact that you're surrounded by incredibly bright and motivated people. The myth of Harvard being filled with legacies is very dated, as many legacies with good scores get turned down. On top of that is the incredible amount of resources at Penn, Princeton or Yale in comparison to San Diego State, Rice or Gonzaga. The endowments are incredibly high, generally over $10,000,000,000 and that allows a lot of incredible things to be available to the students.

Finally, the professors at Ivys are "GENERALLY" better because you can't get a job as an Ivy League professor without a lot of qualifications, publications and a reputation.

For the record, I was someone who DIDN'T get into Ivy League schools, but was given scholarship offers to all those Ivy wannabes in the South (Tulane, Rice, Emory, Wake Forest). High SATs but mediocre grades will do that for you...

The top schools are the top schools for a reason, and it's a self-perpetuating process as well. The best and brightest go there, they get the best jobs...the next generation sees which schools get people the best jobs, they see that Penn is better than Drexel, so they all compete to go to Penn, the best and brightest are the ones who get in. How can the Ivy League schools not be the best when all the best students (who don't want to go to MIT, CalTech, Cooper Union or Stanford) fight over who gets to go there while all the mediocre ones look elsewhere?
I agree with your premise here, but two comments I have on what you are saying is that while Ivy League schools do attract very bright students at the end of the day it does not matter where you attend college as your education is what you make of it. THe other thing to consider is that is that the Ivy's are not party schools. Yes, students go out and get wasted on the weekends, but the emphasis on the an Ivy's college experience is placed on education and networking (probably networking above everything else). At the majority of colleges around the country the college experience is almost totally placed on the party and sports.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leftydan6 View Post

I went from private to public school in 7th grade and saw the difference immediately. I was sleeping in class, talking back to the teacher and still getting the highest grades in the class by a mile. I got 112% in Math class...that shouldn't happen, a class should never be that easy for a 7th grader. After four years, I grew frustrated with the lack of quality in the public high school I went to (supposedly one of the top 50 in California) so I looked at the New England Prep Schools.
My GF tells a similar story. She went to a private school from 1st. grade until 10th, then she transfered to a public high school. Even though she went to one of the best public high schools in the state she claims that the 10th and 11th grade students at her public high school where just learning stuff that she learned in 7th and 8th grade at a private school.
 
Old 03-06-2009, 04:37 PM
Status: "Typo-challenged!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,060 posts, read 3,011,395 times
Reputation: 1874
it does not matter where you attend college as your education is what you make of it.
>> It does. but the approach you take to govern what you do about it should be independent of where you went. The path may be longer or less certain, but the it remains a function of your decisions.No piece of paper should govern those...
 
Old 03-06-2009, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Wynnewood, PA/Philadelphia, PA (Temple U)
2,784 posts, read 4,359,007 times
Reputation: 819
Quote:
Originally Posted by leftydan6 View Post
This is exactly why I said "Thanks, but no thanks" to Pepperdine. I went to a physics class (granted, I took physics at my prep school, one that's equivalent to Harvard in prestige) and found myself, a 12th grader, telling Pre-med students how to do the experiments and what they meant. I went to an English class and their discussions were a lot less deep than the ones for the same book in 10th grade. When I see what passes for "A" work at San Diego State, I am appalled. Kids can come out of that (mediocre, at best) school without even knowing the difference between YOUR and YOU'RE...something I learned in elementary school. The lower the quality of the incoming freshmen, the lower the quality of the education.
I absolutely destroyed an MIT educated doctor at Scrabble. I attend Temple University.

We can throw anecdotal irrelevancies around all day...
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