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Old 10-10-2008, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Camberville
7,098 posts, read 8,762,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
So? I was a double major in Economics and English Literature at a pretty rigorous college. I wrote A LOT of papers.

But while you left class and headed to the library, I left class and went to my job as a reporter. I pretty much guarantee you that whenever you knocked off studying for the day, I was still at work, and would still be there long after you were done. Heck, go to school a couple of summer semesters, and you're done in three. Not knocking the difficulty of your major--quite the opposite. But it still isn't anywhere close to as demanding as a student who has to pay his own freight.

Hence my original position. If mom and dad are footing your bills, it's a lot easier than working your way through.

Thankfully some rich Jewish donor is footing my bills so I can triple major, study abroad for a full year plus 2 summers on top of that, take 6 classes a semester (normal is 4), and "work" full time in student government (Dining Services Committee and Emergency Rape Hotline) as well as other volunteer and activism endeavors. If some employer is going to hold it against me that I worked my butt off in high school so I wouldn't HAVE to work some menial grocery store job in college to pay my bills, I wouldn't want to work for that company anyway.

Not everyone who doesn't have to work to get through college has mommy and daddy paying. Plenty of us learned a thing or two about work ethic before we got to college. I probably "make" more in scholarships a year than I will make in my first job!
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Old 10-10-2008, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
7,468 posts, read 14,425,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
I would be concerned about hiring someone who took six years to get through school. That is what, only three classes per semester, and still only a B average? Regardless of work experience, taking six years for college doesn't help anything.
Some schools are co-opted, like Northeastern and Wentworth Institute (I believe). You go to school part time and intern in your particular field of study part time. When you graduate you have both the formal education and the work experience; the only drawback is that since you are only going to school part time, it takes you five to seven years to graduate.

Regardless, there are so many factors involved in why it would take someone six years to graduate. I have a couple of friends who put in close to six years; one switched majors halfway through; one switched majors and then had to wait until certain classes were available (because of course continuity) and two more were put on waiting lists for classes that they needed but couldn't get into because too many students needed them for their majors as well.
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Old 10-10-2008, 11:45 PM
Status: "Fall is almost over!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,637 posts, read 59,609,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MStant1 View Post
Neither. Work experience isnt a definitive....its all about relative work experience. So if you major is engineering an engineering company isn't going to care if you have a lot of work experience in bagging groceries. As far as they are concerned you have never worked a day in your life. A better option would be to work several internships and finish school in the typical 4-5 years.
Absolutely!

Quote:
Originally Posted by FarNorthDallas View Post
How would anyone even know how long it took for a person to graduate college? Just put your graduation year on your resume and that's it (unless you're older and that is to your disadvantage). Don't put a high school graduation year on the resume. No one cares.

I took 5 years to graduate college (in the 1980s) and not one person has ever asked me how long it took. Work experience was asked about and that did natter.
I agree. And to follow up on the first post I quoted, I have been on hiring committees. Never once has it come up how long someone took to finish school. Even if a person put their hs grad year and college grad yr on their resume, and it was more than 4 yrs, the hiring manager likely would not inquire why. Lots of people start college later these days, take a "gap" year, etc. The relevancy would be graduating with honors vs. a "B" average. The relevant work experience is experience that pertains to the job being interviewed for. This has come up in some of the people I helped interview. A new grad is considered a blank slate in their field.

As far as the OP, I doubt these two people were exactly the same in every aspect except their college experiences.
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Old 10-11-2008, 08:40 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 7,768,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Some schools are co-opted, like Northeastern and Wentworth Institute (I believe). You go to school part time and intern in your particular field of study part time. When you graduate you have both the formal education and the work experience; the only drawback is that since you are only going to school part time, it takes you five to seven years to graduate.
I agree that cop-ops and internships are an invaluable tool. I actually participated in an internship program in college. There are many colleges that do co-op and externship programs and still graduate in 4 years. I don't know any undergraduate program that will let you take seven years to graduate. In that time, you could get an undergrad plus a masters degree in a field.
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Old 10-11-2008, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Maine
5,661 posts, read 7,676,831 times
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I hire real life experience before book experience.
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Old 10-13-2008, 12:58 PM
 
25,085 posts, read 26,865,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charolastra00 View Post
Thankfully some rich Jewish donor is footing my bills so I can triple major, study abroad for a full year plus 2 summers on top of that, take 6 classes a semester (normal is 4), and "work" full time in student government (Dining Services Committee and Emergency Rape Hotline) as well as other volunteer and activism endeavors. If some employer is going to hold it against me that I worked my butt off in high school so I wouldn't HAVE to work some menial grocery store job in college to pay my bills, I wouldn't want to work for that company anyway.

Not everyone who doesn't have to work to get through college has mommy and daddy paying. Plenty of us learned a thing or two about work ethic before we got to college. I probably "make" more in scholarships a year than I will make in my first job!
Hey, I attended on a Phi Beta Kappa scholarship. But it didn't begin to pay all the bills. And this was in 1980 when interest rates were 21%. My father the architect and my mother the realtor just didn't have much business.

But, by far, most of the kids who get through aren't doing it on scholarship. So either the parents are paying their freight or they're working.

What's more, having hired far more than my share of college graduates, I can tell you that the work ethic involved in getting a degree is different than the work ethic involved in working an actual job.
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Old 10-14-2008, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Sun Diego, CA
522 posts, read 1,024,928 times
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6 years is kind of a long time to be in college. 5 years I think would be the max.

Speaking from a graduate school position, since I go to law school...
I graduated in 4 1/2 years (9 semesters) while working 20-30 hours a week. I graduated with a 3.35 GPA and an LSAT of 160.

My friend, went to school exclusively. She did not work at all, and graduated in 4, maybe 3 1/2 years. Her GPA was at 3.7'ish with the same LSAT score of 160.

When receiving reply letters from law schools there were a bunch of schools that accepted me over her and maybe only 1 that accepted her over me.

But I think 6 years may be excessive. But at the same time, it depends on where you're working I guess.
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Old 10-14-2008, 11:24 PM
_yb
 
Location: Central New Mexico
1,135 posts, read 3,412,907 times
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My wife is working full time in the field she is getting her masters in. By the time she finishes the grad degree she will have six years of experience to go along with the degree. Plus the company she works for reimburses 100% of the cost if she turns in a B or better. The crappy part is we get taxed as earned income on the reimbursement.

Alot of the better paying positions need the masters as well as the experiance.
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Old 10-14-2008, 11:57 PM
 
274 posts, read 406,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Some schools are co-opted, like Northeastern and Wentworth Institute (I believe). You go to school part time and intern in your particular field of study part time. When you graduate you have both the formal education and the work experience; the only drawback is that since you are only going to school part time, it takes you five to seven years to graduate.
I go to Northeastern and took part in the co-op program. You work full time for 6 months (no classes) and then go to school full time for 6 months. You basically alternate back and forth so that you end up with 3.5 years in the classroom, 1.5 years work experience for a total of 5 years undergrad. However, most are able to finish in 4 -4.5 years because of taking extra summer classes, transfer credit from HS, etc. Most only do 1-2 co-op's as well b/c they have fulfilled class requirements, or it may not make sense to do more than one because of their field.

I'm graduating in the same 4 years but with work experience in the field as well. I didn't hold down jobs while taking classes because I budgeted my money from co-op to hold me over to the next time I would be working. During my summers off, I worked two jobs.

Granted, I never worked at the same time as I was in classes (although I did have other things to juggle, which left little time for work in general), but I still did get the experience working full time. I don't think it's fair to penalize me because I was smart enough to save my money when I did work, and because I didn't work and go to school at the exact moments.
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Old 10-15-2008, 07:18 AM
 
5,685 posts, read 5,550,332 times
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One crucial bit of data that's missing from the original question is what field is involved.

There are some heavily tech or science oriented fields in which the the candidate with the best academic record would have a distinct advantage. This would be particularly true if the job did not require a lot of interaction or team work with others in the group; it wouldn't matter if the candidate had no people skills or experience working well with others, because the only criteria would be their knowledge and ability to work independently.

For other fields, where up-to-date technical knowledge is not as crucial, the B student with real-life experience in the work world would have the edge. That person is likelier to have learned how to work effectively with colleagues of varying backgrounds and skill sets, and probably has better people skills in handling challenging clients or co-workers.

In general, I tend to lean more in favor of candidates with experience over those with only a degree on their resume, but that's because of the nature of the position for which I usually hire.
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