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Old 04-05-2007, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Hell
606 posts, read 80,322 times
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Engineering has so many branches that I'm confused. Is electrical engineering promising? Does Petroleum pay a lot in job market? Don't you think nuclear engineering will damage your health and leads to cancer? Will you be able to make a living when you are old if you pick up computer engineering which develops too fast to keep pace with?

Is there anyone interested in engineering major?or is there anyone who knows something about some fields in engineering?

any information or opinion are expected!Thanks
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Old 04-05-2007, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Weston, FL
2,833 posts, read 8,955,262 times
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With all due respect, I am begining to think you want the good people on this forum to do the thinking and work for you.

If you need direction regarding a career and you're just not certain what might be the way to go - why not take the Myers Briggs test. It can serve as a good guide for someone who may not have a clue as what they might be suited for -- it's not perfect, but it's a start.

Engineering has multiple facets... but I think it's time for you to do the research.
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Old 04-05-2007, 10:31 AM
 
8,322 posts, read 22,481,894 times
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Like many career paths, there's so many options available that it's impossible to answer your generalized question in a meaningful way.

It really depends upon what you value for your time, job security, pay scales, work environment, and so forth.

All of the engineering disciplines offer a good income at various times in various places. Some career paths will even have a pretty stable employment market. Some paths will pay well for a time, perhaps the duration of a project or contract, and then you'll be bidding on another job assignment within the company or be "laid off", on the street ... seeking another employer or waiting for the next project to hire at your old employer, perhaps relocating.

If you are young and seeking career guidance to determine which branch of engineering or whether or not to go for that degree, I'd consult with the guidance counselor at your school and also interview with people at job fairs about what they're seeking for new hires and what the career track would be like with their company.
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Old 04-05-2007, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
2,919 posts, read 7,316,145 times
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Engineering is about as good as it gets job wise unless you want to go into the medical field. It does involve a great deal of math/science and precision. You can't be sloppy and be an engineer.

Petroleum engineering jobs and nuclear jobs are confined for the most part to particular locales. That is something to keep in mind. I have many friends who are nuclear engineers and none of them have had health problems. The Navy is where many got their training, Annapolis, is free by congressional appointment if you're an outstanding potential officer candidate.

There is also a field called civil engineering, people that deal with bridges and roads and such. Computer engineers will need to keep up with changes. Computer software people are especially in demand to imbed coding into newly created products. There is something called biomedical engineering which will be a big thing in the future.

My choice would be electrical engineering merely because I like electronics. Physicsts and mathematicians seem to be in demand in the computer industry too. You can always add an MBA on top of any engineering degree, a popular move these days.

Engineering is a fascinating field. All facets of it pay well. It doesn't necessarily confine you to any one country either. Opportunities are available all over the world. With rapid advances and new developments you'll be guaranteed a job in engineering.
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Old 04-10-2007, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Lots of sun and palm trees with occasional hurricane :)
8,298 posts, read 11,072,885 times
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My son is a mechanical engineer. Engineering is a tough major and you need good study habits and lots of self-discipline. You need a certain personality to like it and get through it. Nuclear, biomed, chemical, those are even harder but my feeling is that engineering is a field which teaches you how to THINK, analyze, and be critical and systematic in your approach to problems/solutions that you can apply to anything in life or to the absurd. It is a great foundation for anything else you may want to do over and above, even in a totally different field or with another major. Many physicians were engineers first. Many engineers will become PEs (professional engineers). Those are the ones that make the bigger bucks but it's not easy to get that PE.
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Old 04-10-2007, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
1,501 posts, read 7,734,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducksburg View Post
Engineering has so many branches that I'm confused. Is electrical engineering promising? Does Petroleum pay a lot in job market? Don't you think nuclear engineering will damage your health and leads to cancer? Will you be able to make a living when you are old if you pick up computer engineering which develops too fast to keep pace with?

Is there anyone interested in engineering major?or is there anyone who knows something about some fields in engineering?

any information or opinion are expected!Thanks
Back in high school (early 90s), I wanted to be a nuclear engineer. I lived in a town with several fission reactors (mostly research, not power), and the father of a friend was a nuclear engineer. He told me it would be a big mistake and there wasn't much future in it. Considering it was my dream for years, it was hard to hear. But, it did help convince me. I didn't do it.

Engineering is a tough discipline. Don't go into it just because of the of the future it in, there will always be jobs in all the engineering fields. A good portion of those who start in engineering do not graduate in engineering. Pick something you love. I say this as someone who went to a very strong engineering school, spent 2 years in an engineering program, switched to math, graduated, worked in software development for a few years, then went back and got a masters in industrial engineering.
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Old 04-10-2007, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
4,487 posts, read 10,248,647 times
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I'm an Aeronautical Engineering major and my cousin was an Aeronautical Engineer. It's definetly a demanding job with much stress placed on you. He LOVED his job (worked for LTV now it's Lockheed Martin). Although I have my degree, I haven't pursued the career. I enjoy my current job but in the coming years who knows what might happen.

You need to be determined and handle stress well to be in the engineering field. The pay is great but the some feel the stress isn't worth it.
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Old 04-11-2007, 11:21 PM
 
3,020 posts, read 16,688,489 times
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Default Go for it

Quote:
Originally Posted by ducksburg View Post
Engineering has so many branches that I'm confused. Is electrical engineering promising? Does Petroleum pay a lot in job market? Don't you think nuclear engineering will damage your health and leads to cancer? Will you be able to make a living when you are old if you pick up computer engineering which develops too fast to keep pace with?

Is there anyone interested in engineering major?or is there anyone who knows something about some fields in engineering?

any information or opinion are expected!Thanks
I am an engineer. EE & ASE-C. But I worked as an Instrumentation and Controls Engineer. A while back it was more on the job type apprentice type way to actually get into it. Now they have courses for a degree in the field. Super good field. One of the highest paying, usually not enough peeps availlable. It is all about anything that measures, senses, controls or most computers in industrial settings. Very interesting. Lots of retrofit type work, many existing plants always need upgrades. Should be tons of work forever.

I&C is sort of the prima donna's on most projects in the main line type engineering disciplines. You typically get a lot more paid additional training at company expense. About like the computer field. A minor in computer engineering is the way to go.

If you go into major industrial plants, all the control rooms are the responsibility of the I&C engineers. They also develop all the logic that drives the designs, what the electric engineers use as their inputs to wire things. Plus the I & C's have their fingers in everbody's pie. Must understand what the mechanicals do very well, they end up checking a lot of it for their inputs, also get tasked with fixing major mechanical screw up, once built very tough to redo, they look for the I & C to control the beast in some manner. Also do all the sensors, measuring devices, control devices. Variable speed technology is huge today. Requires I & C input in a major way.

They also do the industrial type computers, both hardware and programming. I did a lot of it. Very interesting, especially with the present state of the art systems. Your typical plant might have a working life of 50 years, it might get major upgrades every 10 years or shorter. The technology changes very rapid. Good degree to get into robotics.

Good field to start your own company.

Process engineers can be good. They design the process in complex industrial settings, like refinery, pulp & paper, manufacturering, etc. They have a heavy background in chemistry and metallurgy. Pay is very good.

Civil, architecture, structural engineers are not as well paid. Tends to be lots of them, lot of foreign engineers. I would in general avoid it. Good if you are going to run your own company, like say a contractor. Pay for a Civil can be miserable in many jobs. These are the guys who are preferred for management jobs in many fields.

Really good mechanical engineers are tough to find. For the right peeps very good pay. Chance to start your own company, huge number of ways to make a living. They can become managers.

Electrical Engineering can be good, but as an EE I would say go for I & C. A dual EE / I & C is a killer background. A very broad understanding, EE, Electronics, I & C you probably can never be unemployed very long. I & C will pay better than EE. Lots of plain vanilla EE's around. Tougher to be a manager.

I am also a nuke by training, Navy Nuclear Power Program, learned far more than any college.

Nuclear power working environment is safer than being in your house. Is so highly monitored.

Petroleum or anything associated with the Oil / Gas business is good.

Lot of incompetent engineers running around. Tough to get the right practical hands on training to complement the theory type education. That was where the Nuke Program was super. Folks in very high demand with that background and the right degrees.

Computer engineering can be tough, like most branches it has broken into specialized areas. Some of my relatives are computer types. Most have moved up into management type positions. Is where the bigger money is.

Still can make your own fortune as an independent with the right idea.

Aeronautical Engineering is probably interesting. Don't know about the pay.

Today you do need the PE. More a piece of paper on the wall but that is the way it works. Got to jump thru the hoops, there is a bit more politics in the game than in my working days. Used to be just be extremely good and that was enough. Engineers in general make poor managers, sometimes horrible bosses. The ones who eventually do become good managers were probably poor engineers.
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Old 04-12-2007, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Michissippi
2,832 posts, read 4,724,141 times
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Engineering is the most valuable bachelors degree you could obtain. Of course, the king of all degrees is the MD because of the limitted number of doctors the AMA and the government allow to be produced every year, but after that, it would have to be engineering.

However, this is just one caveat. Not everyone can become an engineer. In fact, few people have what it takes to become an engineer, even otherwise very bright people.

You must be very good at math. If you weren't in the AP math courses in high school and if, in those classes, you needed more than moderate effort to get A's, then you should probably forget about it. You'll need to eat and breathe math to graduate as an engineer, and not just simple algebra, but rather abstract, advanced calculus. Also, you should have easily rolled over your physics classes, earning easy A's.

That's my impression, but I'm not an engineer. Perhaps some of the real engineers can correct me on that.

So, yeah, it's a great field--if you have the mathematical ability and the wherewithall to do it. The engineering degree is also very valuable in other fields for that very reason. If you combine it with an MBA you'll be regarded as being smarter and a better problem solver than business majors (though probably not regarded as being nearly as socially adept). You could also combine a EE with a law degree and work as a EE patent lawyer (generally, a field with a strong job market).
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Old 04-12-2007, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
4,487 posts, read 10,248,647 times
Reputation: 3758
Quote:
You must be very good at math. If you weren't in the AP math courses in high school and if, in those classes, you needed more than moderate effort to get A's, then you should probably forget about it. You'll need to eat and breathe math to graduate as an engineer, and not just simple algebra, but rather abstract, advanced calculus. Also, you should have easily rolled over your physics classes, earning easy A's.
True. Most engineers took college-level math in high school. I took every single math class that I possibly could. Chemisty and Physics are also needed to be an engineer (in most fields). I LOVED Physics, it was one of the most interesting subjects that I took and I'd love to take it over again. The only math class that I really didn't care for too much was Geometry.
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