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Old 09-22-2009, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,823 posts, read 39,447,126 times
Reputation: 48636

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Quote:
Originally Posted by th3vault View Post
I have to disagree with this. The only jobs that an English major can get that a Pharmacist can't are the jobs that specifically require an English degree. These are far, far outnumbered by the pharmacy or compsci specific jobs.

As for the jobs that require just any degree, a Pharmacy or CompSci degree looks more rigorous and impressive to many employers than an English degree does.

Law schools accept any degree, an English degree does not put one at an advantage over someone with a hard science degree.
I've found that being well-spoken and an excellent writer and communicator does more to leave a good impression on prospective employers than the specifics of the degree in many cases, and those who obtained their degrees in English rarely have to worry about not being exceptionally strong in those areas. Plain and simple, it's an asset, and definitely not something that every applicant possesses in spades.

I've been given the responsibility of hiring, and I've thrown out supposedly qualified applicants' materials, when on paper, they appeared to possess the required educational background, because they evidenced no ability to write using error-free, sophisticated language. Regardless of degree or background, if you lack the ability or, worse, the sense, to present yourself professionally and intelligently, you're not an asset to my workplace.

I've never worked anywhere where anybody cared whether or not applicants had a "hard science" degree - nor would I apply, given my background and interests, to an employer where that educational background was stated criteria. I've still found my degree to be far more versatile than many.
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Old 09-22-2009, 02:46 PM
 
90 posts, read 287,318 times
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This might be helpful: The Best Paying Undergrad College Degrees Political Math
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Old 09-22-2009, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Florida
1,779 posts, read 3,385,879 times
Reputation: 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I've found that being well-spoken and an excellent writer and communicator does more to leave a good impression on prospective employers than the specifics of the degree in many cases, and those who obtained their degrees in English rarely have to worry about not being exceptionally strong in those areas. Plain and simple, it's an asset, and definitely not something that every applicant possesses in spades.

I've been given the responsibility of hiring, and I've thrown out supposedly qualified applicants' materials, when on paper, they appeared to possess the required educational background, because they evidenced no ability to write using error-free, sophisticated language. Regardless of degree or background, if you lack the ability or, worse, the sense, to present yourself professionally and intelligently, you're not an asset to my workplace.

I've never worked anywhere where anybody cared whether or not applicants had a "hard science" degree - nor would I apply, given my background and interests, to an employer where that educational background was stated criteria. I've still found my degree to be far more versatile than many.
Having an error on a resume will kill just about any applicant. But you don't need an English degree to proofread a resume.

Regardless, I agree with you that an English degree does have its merits. I was just pointing out that what the previous poster said about having more opportunities with an English degree than a hard science degree is false. The major specific jobs in the hard science and engineering fields are far more numerous than the major specific jobs for English majors.

For jobs that require any degree, both English and hard science majors can apply. There is nothing that says a compsci major HAS to go into computer science.
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Old 09-22-2009, 06:57 PM
 
1,340 posts, read 2,433,430 times
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[quote=CHICAGOLAND92;10840312]Sorry for reviving this thread, but someone sent me a rep point for this out of the blue, so I decided to update my status on prospective fields to study, just incase someone out there was wondering.

I'm in my senior year right now, and have been receiving TONS of mail from colleges since my sophomore year (when I took the PSATs). Anyways, I'm still leaning toward engineering, or something along the lines of math, since that is one of my favorite subjects. Like some previous posters said, mathematics/science degrees are very versatile. My math teacher was telling me that if we were to get a degree in mathematics, basically any law school in the country would accept us. I found that pretty interesting.

I also agree that a degree in liberal arts isn't too impressive. I received a booklet from Butler University, and they broke down the stats of their five colleges. Their College of Education, College of Pharmacy and Health Science, and College of Business have at least 81% employment after college, while the Jordan College of Fine Arts only has 51% employment after college, and only 40% their College of Liberal Arts and Sciences graduates gain employment. 46% of them continue to grad school..perhaps this is because not many employers are taking their degrees seriously?

Many probaly dont take Butler seriously as well.
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Old 09-22-2009, 07:16 PM
 
691 posts, read 2,020,234 times
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I think that the key to good employment with a liberal arts degree, or degree like English, Journalism, Communication, is an excellent internship that demonstrates how you were able to apply your knowledge into the work environment. My friend did an internship at a company that designs computer software, she assisted with the instruction manual, and also worked on the educational information tutorials for the software. She now has an excellent job. So, don't wash out English majors. She is now working on a specialist degree in technical writing.

BTW, everyone told her to work on her "burger flipping skills"...she now has the last laugh.
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Old 09-23-2009, 01:31 PM
 
Location: San Bernardino County (previously L.A.)
4,485 posts, read 7,549,861 times
Reputation: 3872
Nursing's good, otherwise, go ahead & be a doctor or lawyer.
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Old 09-27-2009, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 24,649,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by th3vault View Post
Thanks for the link. Very intersting and helpful!

For those not familiar with A&M, it has a strong military tradition and Corps of Cadets. There are going to be significantly more graduating students entering the military than at other schools.
Yes there is a strong military tradition but keep in mind that there are fewer than 2,000 Corps members in a student body of more than 45,000.
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Old 08-01-2010, 06:27 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,448 times
Reputation: 10
Follow your heart! I know this sounds like "unicorns and dreamland" - but if you study in a field you like--that you are showing some real promise of good grades and interest, rather than study in a field for it's money or prestige, you will succeed-because ultimately, you have to do it EVERYDAY of your life! Why not choose a profession that you have an ingrained knowledge and specialty in?

Do the process of illimination game; Do you want to teach (yes/no), Do you want to be a part of anything medical related/patient care/ (yes/no)...Do you want to design the next super sneaker? (yes/no) If your focus is on computers---look at all the jobs that are available in that field and research how those professionals arrived at those jobs. You'd be amazed how cold calling an individual about their expertise can guide you to the track that they took to get where they are today! Best of luck!
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Old 08-17-2010, 12:09 AM
 
10 posts, read 59,911 times
Reputation: 15
Nursing is rewarding.
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Old 02-21-2013, 02:04 PM
 
1 posts, read 869 times
Reputation: 10
I am in the same spot like you. I was English major then I came to the US as an exchange student. When I explored and took different courses, I decided I want to go to a different major but I still don't know which one. I am thinkng of accounting or political science
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