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Old 02-23-2010, 08:31 PM
 
4,893 posts, read 1,045,598 times
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Default What is the easiest Business degree to achieve?

I'm a senior in college. I have completed all required classes with the exception of my major classes. I took three Finance courses this semester and dropped two of them because I simply wasn't enjoying the classes. Why trouble myself with such a difficult degree when every person I know working in an upper level finance position has a degree in psychology or liberal arts?

I have decided that, due to my senoritis and faltering study ethic, to switch my degree to whatever is the easiest to achieve in the College of Business. Do you guys have any suggestions on what degree to pursue? Are there any business degrees that are known for being easier to achieve than others?
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:36 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX, USA
5,124 posts, read 6,556,382 times
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I had to take one finance class for my general business admin. major and I hated it so I feel your pain but I cannot imagine having to do three!
How about going the general business admin. route? If you are technology inclined Computer Information Systems and Management Information Systems are good routes to take as well and computer folks are needed at finance firms as well. Good luck!
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Old 02-24-2010, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Saint Louis, MO
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If you want to work in finance, you should probably major in that, instead of being lazy and trying to find the easiest option possible.
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Old 02-24-2010, 08:02 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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The people with lib arts degrees working in hedge funds probably didn't have senioritis- they probably just had the good sense to major in something they found interesting and developed work skills that translated into real jobs. Unless you've got a good internship or two under your belt, all you'll have to show a potential employer is your transcript, and if they see you can't even be bothered to explore the area you supposedly want to work in, you can kiss getting a good job goodbye.

The good jobs to people with A) connections and B) strong degrees from top schools. No one wants to hire a lazy person. A lack of specialization and focus on higher level courses will really hurt you.
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Old 02-24-2010, 08:15 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX, USA
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Came back to check the progress of this thread. You are a senior, just push through and do the very best you can. You are almost done!
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:15 PM
 
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I don't think that changing my major this late in the game will affect future employment opportunities. I actually have a plethora of connections. I'm a bartender at one of Tampa's largest nightclubs, and have been throughout my college career. Working in a position such as that, knowing lots of people just comes with the part. I have had a few job interviews and talks with people working in financing fields (mostly insurance), and they have told me that you just need 'a' degree to be hired. I ask them what degree they specifically need, and they have all told me, just "a degree" is all that is needed for them to hire me.

I originally wanted to become an actuary, and for this particular field, I was told that a degree in mathematics or finance would give me an edge, so I decided to pursue finance in college, but I never really enjoyed it. I have decided not to become an actuary any longer and am now at a dead end as to what I want to do after college. I just know that I have to finish, but I'm not going to stress myself out over it if the stress isn't necessary for entry level jobs. I would rather drop the difficult Finance major and finish my studies in something less stressful, especially since my current bartending job will probably still pay more than whatever offer I have after college.
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:22 PM
 
771 posts, read 192,709 times
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Finance is not hard unless you find it boring. Manufacturing the discipline to study anything is difficult if you hate it, regardless of whether or not the material is intellectually difficult to comprehend. Your problem-solving skills are proving to be weak here; clearly the problem with finance, unless you have some sort of mild retardation or learning disability, is that it bores you. You attempt to circumvent this problem by....taking something that is equally dis-interesting.


Fail.
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:27 PM
 
4,893 posts, read 1,045,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skeet09 View Post
I had to take one finance class for my general business admin. major and I hated it so I feel your pain but I cannot imagine having to do three!
How about going the general business admin. route? If you are technology inclined Computer Information Systems and Management Information Systems are good routes to take as well and computer folks are needed at finance firms as well. Good luck!
I'm leaning on the General Business route. Thank you for the positive comment.
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:46 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX, USA
5,124 posts, read 6,556,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
I'm leaning on the General Business route. Thank you for the positive comment.
Good luck to ya!
No matter what (whether more money or not awaits when you are done), just finish your degree! There's folks out there retiring these days who wish they would have completed their last semester, year, etc or majored in something else. Regret is hard to live with sometimes!
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Old 02-24-2010, 01:36 PM
 
Location: SLC, UT
381 posts, read 608,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
I don't think that changing my major this late in the game will affect future employment opportunities. I actually have a plethora of connections. I'm a bartender at one of Tampa's largest nightclubs, and have been throughout my college career. Working in a position such as that, knowing lots of people just comes with the part. I have had a few job interviews and talks with people working in financing fields (mostly insurance), and they have told me that you just need 'a' degree to be hired. I ask them what degree they specifically need, and they have all told me, just "a degree" is all that is needed for them to hire me.

I originally wanted to become an actuary, and for this particular field, I was told that a degree in mathematics or finance would give me an edge, so I decided to pursue finance in college, but I never really enjoyed it. I have decided not to become an actuary any longer and am now at a dead end as to what I want to do after college. I just know that I have to finish, but I'm not going to stress myself out over it if the stress isn't necessary for entry level jobs. I would rather drop the difficult Finance major and finish my studies in something less stressful, especially since my current bartending job will probably still pay more than whatever offer I have after college.
I'm not sure who gave you the advice of going into finance to become an actuary but I wouldn't trust them any longer. All of the actuaries I've ever met have degrees in math or statistics. Finance wouldn't provide you with the math skills necessary to become an actuary (unless you took them as electives).

I also think you're confusing finance jobs with insurance... generally people who work in insurance who have "any" degree are sales people. Which is fine if that's what you want to do but I would hardly call those people "finance" professionals even though they sell financial products (read: annuities). If you want to get into true finance you're need to move to a financial center (New York, Chicago, etc.) and those jobs are very hard to come by nowadays. A lot of those jobs disappeared during the recession and there are plenty of people who were laid off from these jobs as competition.

Finally, I bartended during my last year of college and during grad school. I wouldn't count on anything people you're feeding drinks to amounting to very much. Everyones best friend is the bartender until they sober up the next day.
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