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Old 11-20-2014, 12:03 PM
 
186 posts, read 246,832 times
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When I was in CC, I was one of few in my program under 25. Most people I've seen in my experience were over 30.
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Old 11-23-2014, 07:48 PM
 
1,242 posts, read 1,166,579 times
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Hah, just replied to other posters and didn't realize this thread was a relic that was dug up. Hopefully they've graduated by now.

I'm also making plans to go back to school to pursue a medical degree and am in my mid 30's. won't be out till my 40's so it should be interesting. I was actually wondering if it was reasonable to take a full course load while working full time and pursuing an undergrad degree. Any experiences to share?
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Old 11-24-2014, 12:36 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,325 posts, read 2,595,441 times
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I've met some folks who started working out of high school, and later on went back to fulfill college. Not too shabby.

Some degrees and programs may not be as attractive due to ROI like law school, med, and MBA, but I'll have to leave that to those who are better in the know to spill the details.

Oh, when I was in a History class in college, a professor shared a story how back a few decades, he was covering the CCC program created by FDR. The topic came up of how some of those who were in the program just stood on the sides of roads doing nothing garnered a bit of criticism. An old tymer raises his hand and said he was in the CCC back then! Those blokes were standing around because there weren't enough shovels and general equipment for everyone. It turns out, this guy, much later in life decided he really wanted to get his college degree, so here he is, in his 60s, doing just that!
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Old 11-29-2014, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Back in the gym...Yo Adrian!
9,371 posts, read 17,457,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eazine View Post
Hah, just replied to other posters and didn't realize this thread was a relic that was dug up. Hopefully they've graduated by now.

I'm also making plans to go back to school to pursue a medical degree and am in my mid 30's. won't be out till my 40's so it should be interesting. I was actually wondering if it was reasonable to take a full course load while working full time and pursuing an undergrad degree. Any experiences to share?
I worked full time and went to school full time to get my BS in my forties. Now I'm pursuing my Master's, still in my forties...full time course load while workin grill time. Once you get into it, you realize how productive you can be when you give up some Internet surfing, television, or other forms of wasting time just a few hours per week. Try it, see how it goes for a semester. Mix your classes between traditional in-classroom courses and online. The online classes will give you the flexibility you need. Most universities offer each.
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Old 08-04-2015, 04:18 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,754 times
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yes indeed the attainment of a degree gives you that rewarding feeling of having accomplished a feat that too few students are as fortunate to reach. I am 37 and just completed my bachelors of science and am going into the grad school environment. I have disability too so I understand what an impressive feat it is to obtain a high academic attainment.
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Old 08-04-2015, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,802 posts, read 39,211,415 times
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Old thread, but timely topic.

I started a graduate program at 37, years and years after getting my B.A. at the more traditional age. It's not so uncommon. My program is a pretty good mix of age ranges, and I fall in the middle of the pack at 38.
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Old 08-04-2015, 06:17 PM
 
394 posts, read 264,513 times
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I mean... as long as you have the means and are doing something conducive to yourself... I would say personally, financially, and mentally(learning wise) then it's worth it

PLENTY of people go back, more than one might think, and many people have CAREER CHANGES... it's just a fact of life

so there is nothing wrong with it, but also, presumably, you have to know (at THAT point lol) what you're getting yourself into
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Old 08-05-2015, 08:30 PM
 
553 posts, read 436,327 times
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You're not the only one who feels that way. I am 25 and still going to school. Like you, I wanted to graduate on time, but I was being lazy and stupid, and it didnt help that I held a full time job that ended at midnight. I'd rather snooze in than go to school the next day.

I finally got my act together just last year and even if I take part time classes, I think I will be done by the time I am in my early - mid thirties. I cant imagine spending anymore than 10 years to finish up a bachelors adn 2 years of grad school. Most of my friends have accomplished much more than me, and even my sisters who are 5 and 7 years younger than me probably have more college credits than I do and yes, when I think about it its so depressing but quitting is not an option. If I quit, I will lose everything and will never obtain that career that would provide for my kids.

I have the potential to earn up to 4k with the job I currently have, but it offers no stability and benefits. Its a contract job. I dont want to be stuck working this job for the rest of my life.
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Old 08-06-2015, 04:02 AM
 
Location: USA
83 posts, read 65,123 times
Reputation: 29
Well, My father completed his degree when he was 32 years. So I think education has no limits....!!!
If you have appetite to explore and understand things no one can stop you. A good education requires a sense of inspiration that is most important for us. Today, many online websites are available to increase your knowledge. I also learn from online websites which provides me a sufficient package related to my field.
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Old 09-04-2015, 02:24 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,694 times
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I got my Bs when I'm 41.
You are not late at all.--people work at their 70's.
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