U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-03-2011, 04:42 PM
 
44 posts, read 105,369 times
Reputation: 36

Advertisements

I currently work in construction management, primarily in heavy civil and heavy commercial. Like many others, no degree and paid decent. While you can certainly do it, I would recommend you go for the degree. It will only help you. FYI, I am actually in the process of going back to school for my degree. For me, I've always wanted it. Plus many employers (at the level I want to work) are very picky and want the degree even if all other items are in check.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-27-2012, 07:47 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,133 times
Reputation: 10
A 4 yr apprentiship is four years of on the job training. (and you dont mortgage your soul, they actually pay you) Add another 5 or ten years to that and you are a seasoned pro. Capable of running a job of considerable size. Its a shame that that alone is not sufficient anymore. When I started managing projects, A CM degree didnt even exist. Every time you turn around now, the universities are inventing another degree, convincing everyone you cant possibly do the job with out it. Four years in the class room is not long enough to learn half of what is required to run a large building project. My advice, make friends with the working foremans. They can teach you what the university can't. and help put the critical path in perspective.
Good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-08-2012, 03:49 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,116 times
Reputation: 10
What if you've spent your teenage years working in the family construction business, its own sort of apprenticeship. If my goal is to work with a large engineering/construction firm, possibly in heavy civil, does it make sense to get the CM degree? If not, how do I gain entry?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2013, 10:23 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,027 times
Reputation: 10
Default arch to cm

I am graduating this spring with a degree for architecture.... And am pretty much set on going to get my masters in construction management. After four years of architecture I realized I wanted to be on the more of a business hands on side of things. Does anyone see this as being the best option for me?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2013, 11:06 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,642,161 times
Reputation: 8781
The best school for CM or BC is the University of Florida. They are the first, one of the better reputed, and one of the biggest. They call it the School of Building Construction (as opposed to Construction Management). By graduating from a collegiate program, you can go to work for bigger construction companies on bigger projects, and not for the mom and pop construction outfits.

Rinker School - Prospective Students - Undergraduate

http://www.bcn.ufl.edu/common_pdfs/constrmanagement.pdf

There are about 5 or 10 good others, but this is the best known in the U.S.

I think there are associate degrees and certificate degrees given by community colleges or extension programs at universities. Those will get you into the field, but if you can get a BSCM or a BSBC, you'll go farther in the field.

Last edited by robertpolyglot; 02-12-2013 at 11:30 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2013, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,610 posts, read 63,043,843 times
Reputation: 30751
I am a constuction lawyer. Have bene for 24 years. I serve some of the biggest companies in the industry and loads of small companies too.

THe majority of my successful clients have a degree in civil engineering, some have MBAs instead or as well. The construction management guys are often out in the field running jobs (but most of those guys also have a technical background as well) or they are handling payables, insurance, or contracts.

At the same time there are quite a few smaller guys who started their own company and did not finsh their degree, there are a few who did not go beyind or even finish high school, but those are getting few and far betweeen becasue things have gotten so complicated it is hard to make it if you are not highly motiviated and academically astute. Still there are some. At the smaller companies, the owners can make a ton of moeny. More than the CEO of some of the bigger companies. Generally the people other than the owners at small companies do not do all that well. Once in a while, a small comany owner will share proficts or offer ownership equity to key employees.

For every small guy that makes it, six fail. THe big thing you need to make it is financial backing. (But not always).

I have one client who started his company with two credit cards with a $20,000 limit on each one. He knew people in the industry from working for KB homes. They helped him get contracts. In a ew years he had $80 million worth of equipment and $5 million in his personal bank account. However there have been times where he wa at risk of going out of business and losing his personal assets.

Another guy started his company with a pick up a wheel barrow cement mixer and a pick and shovel. He build it into a $20 million a year operation, then went bust. He built it up again and went bust again. Repaeat and repeat. Not sure how he is doing now. I lost touch with him after his last bankruptcy.

The guys who make big money take big risks. They also find sources of money to back them and so they usually have to share the big money with their backers.

If you choose the employee of a big company route, it is more stable and secure. However your degree will matter more and you will likely never make more than $200,000 if you even get that far. If you want to make the big $, you have to start your own company after getting some experience and then work yourself nearly to death and have good luck. You may have to fail a half dozen times before you make it, or you may never make it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2013, 01:50 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,642,161 times
Reputation: 8781
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
I am a constuction lawyer. Have bene for 24 years. I serve some of the biggest companies in the industry and loads of small companies too.

THe majority of my successful clients have a degree in civil engineering, some have MBAs instead or as well. The construction management guys are often out in the field running jobs (but most of those guys also have a technical background as well) or they are handling payables, insurance, or contracts.
True, C.E. is another way in. However, BC/CM degrees are more rooted in construction topics and have some commonalities with the business school, and a CE curriculum is fully rooted in the engineering school, in terms of a mindset and courses. Many BC/CM grads make respectable livings as project managers for the big name construction firms and many are "vocational" in their approach, so they are not interested in the top-down view of the top brass. If they added a MBA or JD, they could run the companies. Some will do that and others don't want to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2013, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
3,044 posts, read 4,020,756 times
Reputation: 3898
Negotiating a contract. That's the most important thing you'll do in CM next to RENOGOTIATING when things go wrong.
And a degree doesn't teach it. It sounds like the OP examples were men that were suited to the trade.

An A.A. is nice. B.C.I.T. in British Columbia has a fabulous program. But I can never tell where anyone is posting from on these forums over half the time!

Depending on your learning curve one guy I know who spent six months with each trade and then jumped into management.
He ran entire townhouse sites on his own, but if you're looking at playing with the big boys (hospitals, schools) you had better have formal training with very good people skills. You'll be spending a lot of time with people that can say NO dozens of different ways (government employees) but you'll have to get them to say yes, and make them think it's all THEIR IDEA!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2016, 09:58 AM
 
8,957 posts, read 5,099,664 times
Reputation: 9274
university of southern mississippi has a great construction mangerment degree
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2018, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
3,044 posts, read 4,020,756 times
Reputation: 3898
Default Associate in Arts

Quote:
Originally Posted by trnsplntfrmNV View Post
ScreenName: I have a question, as you are going through this 4 year program, did you ever ove think of going to a 2 year to just get the cm degree?
My two best bosses both got their junior college degree at a really good school (BCIT in Burnaby, BC) and went to management right away. But there are two things that degree doesn't teach you: people skills and how to negotiate, and re-negotiate when something goes sideways. Which in construction, happens all the time.

Another did six months running with a plumbing crew, six months electrical, six months forming and framing, six months as a detail "deficiency" guy: firestop, tiling, furnace, site prep. and then went consulting. Worked for him.
Find out what works and fits for you.

Lots of site supervisors I've worked with that I actually liked not only didn't finish high school, a few were functionally illiterate and couldn't even add!. Too many carpenters I've met are like that as well: they keep th efractions in their head as a compensation. Just don't give them a METRIC tape measure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Colleges and Universities
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top