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Old 07-14-2011, 08:49 PM
 
5,016 posts, read 6,713,973 times
Reputation: 4546

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I didn't say our roads are the worst in the country. I said that weather's impact on road maintenance is one of the worst if not the worst because of our freeze/thaw cycle. The places you mentioned may get more snow/cold, but they do not get the temperature extremes within short periods that allow water to freeze/thaw/freeze/thaw which quickly deteriorates roads. I will have to see if I can find where I learned this again, but I have heard it often from weathermen, people who work on roads, geologists, etc.
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Old 07-15-2011, 11:18 AM
 
808 posts, read 1,179,308 times
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Regarding roads and transportation infrastructure, I recall reading an article several years ago that highlighted how Colorado Springs traditionally is the "odd man out" when Colorado divies up the federal (and state?) transportation dollars it gets. Basicially, Denver has the political clout and population to take it's giant piece of the pie. Rural counties then band together to vote themselves a healthy slice (relative to population size). That apparently leaves smaller metro areas like Colorado Springs with a significantly smaller share of the pie, relative to our population. It's more of a political power/influence thing than a "we hate to pay taxes" thing. Multiply the above over several decades and you get Denver with a metro-rail and crumbling streets in the Springs.
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Old 07-15-2011, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
19,045 posts, read 8,952,548 times
Reputation: 18405
Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
I didn't say our roads are the worst in the country. I said that weather's impact on road maintenance is one of the worst if not the worst because of our freeze/thaw cycle. The places you mentioned may get more snow/cold, but they do not get the temperature extremes within short periods that allow water to freeze/thaw/freeze/thaw which quickly deteriorates roads. I will have to see if I can find where I learned this again, but I have heard it often from weathermen, people who work on roads, geologists, etc.
And that's what I heard from those same types of people when I lived in western NYS, Maryland, and Virginia...where there is significant amounts of precipitation instead of semi-arid conditions. You don't have daily freezing and thawing in the winter here because you don't have frequent rain.
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Old 07-15-2011, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,108 posts, read 4,678,351 times
Reputation: 5389
Quote:
Originally Posted by smdensbcs View Post
Regarding roads and transportation infrastructure, I recall reading an article several years ago that highlighted how Colorado Springs traditionally is the "odd man out" when Colorado divies up the federal (and state?) transportation dollars it gets. Basicially, Denver has the political clout and population to take it's giant piece of the pie. Rural counties then band together to vote themselves a healthy slice (relative to population size). That apparently leaves smaller metro areas like Colorado Springs with a significantly smaller share of the pie, relative to our population. It's more of a political power/influence thing than a "we hate to pay taxes" thing. Multiply the above over several decades and you get Denver with a metro-rail and crumbling streets in the Springs.
This may or may not be the case, but you need to remember that the Denver metro area has light rail because they created a transportation district decades ago and gave it taxing authority. The district then went to the voters who approved a tax increase to build out light rail. The same is true for the T-Rex project. The communities involved voted to raise their taxes to help build out the project (which came in under budget and under deadline).

If Colorado Springs wants light rail, maybe they should raise the taxes to build it.
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Old 08-16-2011, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
583 posts, read 1,303,811 times
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So, $30 MILLION surplus for Colorado Springs and every other city is running deficits. All this without raising taxes...hmmm.

Very interesting facts...which you will not hear from the tax and spend crowd:

Colorado Springs is No Failed City - YouTube
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Old 08-17-2011, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
641 posts, read 1,959,309 times
Reputation: 423
Tks for posting that!! Perhaps a bit one-sided, but I agree with it, so it's okay....hee hee. Times are tough for everyone, but I don't think our city has plummeted into darkness either.

Last edited by Terytee; 08-17-2011 at 08:32 AM..
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Old 08-18-2011, 06:23 PM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,867 posts, read 7,111,815 times
Reputation: 1546
I love Wayne Laugesen. Have met him before, very bright man.
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Old 08-19-2011, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Back in COLORADO!!!
840 posts, read 2,038,960 times
Reputation: 1377
Quote:
Originally Posted by zenkonami View Post
Because when the schools are privatized, poor families can continue in poverty as they can't afford quality education.

Because when the fire department is privatized, it's tough luck if you can't afford to keep your house from burning down. Hopefully you could afford insurance.

Because when the libraries are privatized, there won't be any more libraries, as we have bookstores for that...and EVERYONE can afford to have the internet anyway...so long as they have as little choice as possible as to who is providing it.

Because when the roads are privatized, the wealthy will be able to get wherever they want to go, while those who can't afford it will just have to pull themselves up by the bootstraps and find a better job elsewhere!...except they won't be allowed to go elsewhere...

Why don't people see the disconnect? Why can't people see that we are living in a time of lower taxes than ever before in our history? Why do people believe that government is ALWAYS the problem and the private industry ALWAYS has our best interests mind (rather than the best interests of their shareholders, regardless of how it affects the place YOU want to live in?)

Frankly I think some people just like to gripe.

In spite of all of our problems, I think we've got it relatively lucky so far here in Colorado.
Great post! One of the best I've read here in a long time!
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Old 08-20-2011, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,221 posts, read 4,658,179 times
Reputation: 1682
Quote:
Originally Posted by zenkonami View Post
Why can't people see that we are living in a time of lower taxes than ever before in our history?
This is a lie. You need to go back and read some history, and by that I mean further back than the 1960s. Heavy taxation and an intrusive nanny-state government is not part of the majority of the nation's or the state/territory's history...it's a recent and unhappy trend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zenkonami View Post
Why do people believe that government is ALWAYS the problem and the private industry ALWAYS has our best interests mind (rather than the best interests of their shareholders, regardless of how it affects the place YOU want to live in?)
Don't kid yourself, the government also has the best interests of its "shareholders" in mind--and those shareholders are the special interests that fund the campaign finance machine, not the citizenry. Look at the TARP...people were against it 300-to-1, but the Congress voted with the deep-pocketed banking cartels instead. Look at the SDS...Colorado Springs politicians are forcing a $4Bn project needed by developers, not by the current citizenry...and they are planning to double our water rates to pay for it. Tell me that the "shareholder" isn't the developer's lobby here.
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