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Old 09-05-2006, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
119 posts, read 630,006 times
Reputation: 68

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Once people move to COS, do any of you find that they stay put and raise their kids? Or is it a place where people live there for a few years and move on elsewhere? How transient is the population there? Will I meet new people and find myself saying good-bye in a few years because they're moving? What's the percentage (if anyone out there knows) of natives to COS vs. newcomers (not counting the military). In CT I'm used to seeing many generations staying in the same place......I'm not saying that's a good or bad thing but that's how it is here.
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Old 09-05-2006, 08:31 PM
 
20,307 posts, read 37,790,850 times
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The military, of course, is rather transient, though less than in past years as the military is reducing the frequency of rotating people to save money and increase morale. This was an actual policy change in the Army, which occurred when I was still working at Army HQs in Washington. For many years we'd lose good soldiers because the wives would just revolt at moving yet again, sometimes every 2-3 years. And with the cut-rate movers that were used, many of the moves turned out badly. In DoD, we used to spend well over a $1B per year on moving people and/or storing their household goods, I was in that part of the biz for several years.

Commercially there is some transience here as many defense contractors and high tech types move more often than the folks in old smokestack industry towns like I came from (Baltimore) and I'm sure that's true for many of those towns.

I've only been here 15 months now, and am not the best source of data, but most of the moves I've seen are military families, both up here near the USAF Academy and on the south end near Fort Carson and Peterson AFB, etc.

Not sure where statistics might be found on household moves, perhaps the moving industry has that, but it wouldn't account for all the do it yourself moves that occur each year.

s/Mike
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Old 09-06-2006, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Monument/ Colorado Springs
137 posts, read 708,493 times
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It depends on why they are here. People who don't get transferred with jobs or the military tend to stick around. And those who do get transferred often come back here to retire. I don't really know of anyone who leaves the area unless they have to. It's just a nice place to live A lot of people come to our area because they believe it's a nice place to raise a family- and they aren't about to go anywhere unless they have to. I still run into people I knew in high school (16 years ago). But military and contractors really do come and go.
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Old 09-06-2006, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
119 posts, read 630,006 times
Reputation: 68
Thanks to both of you. It's reassuring (sp? that word doesn't look right to me...) to know that people stay to raise their families there. I totally understand the whole military thing....my brother who lives there actually was there from 94'-97....had to move his entire family to Germany and then got stationed back at Ft. Carson again in 2002 and is now retired and won't leave. I want to know that the friends my children make will more than likely be their friends for their entire childhood. Stability is important to me (although I'm feeling a bit unstable now thinking about moving in a few months!). CSColorado....have you lived in COS your entire life? Do you still love it there? I know you love it Mike FBE!!! It shows in all your threads...such great enthusiasm! Thanks for your feedback to by the way...
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Old 09-06-2006, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Monument/ Colorado Springs
137 posts, read 708,493 times
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I do love it here! My family moved here when I was 7. I'm married to my high-school sweetheart, and both of our families are here. But even without all of our family here, I wouldn't want to live anywhere else. When I visit most other places I just wonder, "Why on Earth do so many people live here" (Especially the Chicago area... why????). They just don't know what they are missing. We have a lot of people that come to visit, fall in love with the place, and later move here. Lots of people that are transferred with jobs or the military try to get back here as soon as they can. Of course I love it... It's my home-town. But even if that wasn't the case, I still wouldn't want to live anywhere else.
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Old 09-07-2006, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
119 posts, read 630,006 times
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CSColorado...
Where is your family originally from? What was it like for you to move at that age?
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Old 09-09-2006, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, MN
571 posts, read 2,251,002 times
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Curious in CT,

One thing to keep in mind is if you want your kids to have friends that won't move away is to be sure to NOT live in a school district that serves a high percentage of military familes. I worked in two such districts and I believe a full one third of our student population turned over every year. Was kind of hard on the "local" kids who made friends and had to say goodbye, though they did seem to get used to it to a certain degree.

As to the rest of your question, I guess my husband and I were a couple of the "weird" ones who lived in Colorado Springs and moved away without "having" to. But believe me, it wasn't an easy decision at all because it really IS a great place to live. And I could definitely see myself retiring there someday (if I can afford it by then, lol.)

But our reasons were mostly personal/family in nature and didn't have to do with COS itself, though there are some drawbacks to living there too, just like anywhere. (i.e., increased traffic/crowding, rising housing prices, lack of water/lots of water restrictions, too many soul-less "cookie cutter" housing developments...that sort of thing).

CSColorado, I can definitely relate to your experiences. Whenever we had friends out to visit, they all talked about moving there too! And even though we DID move away, I (like you) feel sorry for people who have to live somewhere ugly. We don't have the rockies in northern MN, but it is beautiful here...I see lakes and forests and bald eagles on my way to work and wonder why anyone would want to live where they have to look at industrial parks, strip malls or brown nothing-ness all day. Of course someone else might ask how I can live where we have snow on the ground for at least 4 months out of the year...but hey, if that keeps them out of my "paradise", then keep that global warming out of my backyard

Anyway...good luck to you in your move, Curious in CT.
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Old 09-11-2006, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
119 posts, read 630,006 times
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Thanks MidniteBreeze,

What school districts would you consider a higher percentage of military families? Would those be further south closer to Ft. Carson? Would that be district 49 as well since it's probably closer to Peterson AFB? What parts of town have less of that cookie cutter feel? I know COS is probably getting more crowded since the word is out but it still feels very open to me compared to back east. The one thing people from out west comment about when they visit CT is that they feel closed in because of all the trees. It's a lot darker here. And for a tiny state like CT that's only something like 5,500 +/- square miles we manage to jam pack over 3.5 million people here. So the crowded thing doesn't bother me but the cookie cutter developments are soul-less as you say or make the city feel like it has no character. Other than that I absolutely think it's gorgeous out there. Sorry you had to leave COS but I hope you're enjoying your family in MN. Thanks for the good luck. We'll need it.......Curious
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Old 09-11-2006, 10:12 AM
 
20,307 posts, read 37,790,850 times
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Default Districts

Heaviest concentration of military families is on the south end of town, where Fort Carson, Peterson AFB, Schreiber AFB and Cheyenne Mountain are located. School Districts supporting this are D8, D3, D2, D22. Also, on the far eastern side of the area, D49 (Falcon) gets a lot of military families owing to prices being lower the farther out you go. Zip codes for these districts are: 80913, 80911, 80925, 80929, 80916, 80910, 80917, 80915, respectively.

On the north side we have the USAF Academy. Many USAF people think of this as "home," and many retire here. You get both active duty and military retirees up here, mostly USAF, but a mix of all services. D20 supports these families, and is one of the better rated districts. I've read that it actually has an emphasis on hard science and aeronautical topics, as would befit a highly technical aviator lifestyle. Zip codes up here are 80920, 80921, 80908, 80919. This is a very large area and the presence of military families is not as strong as on the south side. Accordingly, the moving in/out process will not be as pronounced as on the south side.

The main core of the city itself is in D11, a large district with very good schools (the school BOARD sucks, but the schools and teachers are good). Zip codes for D11 areas include: 80918, 80917, 80909, 80907, 80905, 80904, and 80903. There are some military families in here, but I'd say D11 is not affected all that much by people moving in/out.

Note: This data is very general in nature. Zip codes and school districts do not match perfectly, i.e., although 95% of 80908 is in D20, there is a small amount of 80908 in D49. This holds true all over town. Most MLS listings here will tell you which school district a property is in, as well as the names of the schools themselves. Beware a listing that fails to provide this data. Elsewhere in the Colorado forum are threads on how to find the school ratings and such. Lastly, always rely on the advice of your realtor, they have great data and are there to serve you. I'm not a realtor in any way.

s/Mike
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Old 09-11-2006, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Grand Rapids, MN
571 posts, read 2,251,002 times
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Hi Curious,

Mike above gave you a very good run-down of the school districts. I worked in D-11 (at a school close to its southern boundary) and D-2 (south side). Both districts served a lot of the Ft. Carson and Peterson AFB families. As Mike has also mentioned before, the "best" school districts in COS are D-20 (north side) and D-12 (SW side, but VERY expensive neighborhood.) D-11 schools vary in quality, most are decent, but some of the schools in the SE part of the district's boundaries serve a more "challenging" population and thus their test scores, teacher turnover rates, etc. suffer.

Most of the "cookie cutter" developments are in the newer parts of town, i.e., north and east. Colorado Springs DOES have some very charming, more "established" sections of town though...my favorites being the westside (by Old Colroado City and the specatular Garden of the Gods park) as well as the old north end neighborhood by Colorado College. You'll find more tree-lined streets, actual sidewalks and just a more "neighborhood-y" feel than in the far-flung, walled-off developments with cheesy names like "Aspen Heights". In the older neighborhoods, you're also a comfortable distance away from all the big box stores and strip malls that seem to pop up overnight in the east-northeast. Of course with older neighborhoods come older homes...so if a brand-new house is your main priority, you might be disappointed. I personally like houses and neighborhoods with a bit of character and history...but that's just me!
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