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Old 12-25-2013, 07:07 PM
 
Location: sumter
7,164 posts, read 4,632,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
In colorado!!!

The area I grew up in NO CO in had them near the country school, and of course on our ranches. You need to be smart and watchful. I'm not so sure they like domestic game if they can catch wild game, in the wild. They never bothered our pets (but we kept 2 dogs for that reason (The dogs were always on the hunt 'together'). and us kids were always riding horses alone.

A wild animal needs to be pretty hungry or distressed to digress from it's natural habits.

The bobcats were much more likely to poach a cat (just in case the coyotes missed any cats...)

Coyotes will stalk a weak / old domestic dog and team up for the kill.
am I missing something?
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
5,833 posts, read 6,914,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ipaper View Post
what about your personal safety in escorting your dogs should you encounter a mountain lion? will you be carrying a weapon.

I agree here, if they were in my back yard a sidearm would be part of my daily routine. Also the OP should make sure they can use the weapon well, as its useless if you cannot hit the kitty. I think mountain lions are awesome creatures, but I would not want to end up being cat food.
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Black Forest, CO
1,454 posts, read 2,079,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I agree here, if they were in my back yard a sidearm would be part of my daily routine. Also the OP should make sure they can use the weapon well, as its useless if you cannot hit the kitty. I think mountain lions are awesome creatures, but I would not want to end up being cat food.
Yeah, I might have to rethink that.... Never felt I needed to be armed before.
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Old 12-25-2013, 10:43 PM
 
5,003 posts, read 6,678,903 times
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Folks, mountain lions are all over this area, particularly closer to the mountains and foothills. If you get out on our trails at all you've probably been within yards of a mountain lion without knowing it - they see you, but it is pretty rare to see them. Pay attention to what look like large dog tracks - if the pads with a shape like the letter m or w, you're looking at cat tracks, not dog.
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Old 12-26-2013, 02:33 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,510,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I think mountain lions are awesome creatures, but I would not want to end up being cat food.
To my eyes the American cougar is the most beautiful of all the big cats. However, Kitty can weigh up to 200 lbs and certainly deserves due respect and caution for it's ability to seriously injure or even kill a human if it chooses to attack. It's sobering to consider that a big dog has only teeth while a big cat has fearsome teeth plus four additional sets of shredders to ruin your day. A handgun is not that great an inconvenience really.

I was on a boar hunt in the Terai of Nepal many years ago, and didn't feel like hunting one day, so I took my camera and walked out of the camp to take some pictures of the birds and monkeys in the surrounding forest. I got to an oddly quiet spot on the trail where the animals were making no sound. There was the strong smell of cat urine, and a set of really big cat tracks on the path accompanied by smaller cat tracks. There was a momma tiger and cubs nearby somewhere and I was alone in the forest armed only with a 35mm Pentax camera! I backed as calmly as I could up the path the way I had come in and nothing happened. I felt very fortunate and rather stupid. Had she decided I was a threat to her cubs I would have been in real trouble even if I had been armed with a rifle. They come from behind. The woodcutters in the forest there wore masks of faces on the back of their head to protect from tigers.

Last edited by Bideshi; 12-26-2013 at 03:02 AM..
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:00 AM
 
73 posts, read 161,877 times
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I know that you mentioned, "This is the first time in the 20 years we have lived here that we have seen one, though I am sure they have been around before." You are most likely right they have been around before and looking out for those little tell-tale signs goes a long way to acknowledge your current wildlife situation in your area. Seeing one and knowing it could be a threat to your domestic animals would be a concern. Particularly if it was slightly malnourished. Would that be a good reason to get in touch with Wildlife Removal in Colorado Springs? I know it would attribute with the same logic as having a hole in a bucket of water (where there is always another one to replace the one that was just there). I suspect, that's just the price you pay for living in the woods.

Related story (somewhat) that happened in 2010 just down the road and around the corner from you. Mountain lion chases dog through doggie door trapping family inside home

Last edited by onehotzonie; 12-26-2013 at 07:10 AM..
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Black Forest, CO
1,454 posts, read 2,079,841 times
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Though I did not see it up close, from about 400 feet, it seemed large, full grown and healthy. I was amazed the first time I saw one at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. They were much bigger than I expected.
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
20,344 posts, read 20,415,914 times
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a good strategy is to only go out hiking with slow fat people
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Old 12-26-2013, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
641 posts, read 1,954,023 times
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I recommend a can of bear spray when you're out walking.....it's just a large can of pepper spray, that has a longer range than a personal can of pepper spray or mace. It can put a cloud of pepper spray 15-20feet out in front of you. They're inexpensive, and many even come with a belt holster.

There are also small personal defense pepper spray canisters (Ruger makes one), that emits a blinding flashing strobe light, and a super loud screeching, ear-piercing alarm as soon as you pull it away from the holder. It's a very effective deterrant and would scare the heck out of anything with paws.

Mountain lions hunt by stalking from behind, and pouncing on the prey at very close range....drawing and hitting a very fast moving mountain lion with a pistol is harder than most think...I think creating a big ol' wall of cayenne pepper vapor would be more effective in a pinch......granted the wind doesn't blow it back at ya.
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Old 12-26-2013, 08:12 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 4,701,296 times
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I'd really suggest having a gun, at least now that you know the animal comes that close to your house. Without a gun, you aren't really any protection for your dogs. When I go out and visit relatives that live on a farm, I carry a very serious side arm. If a threat comes in my direction, I have no interest in wounding it.

Odds are the creature never becomes a serious threat, but if it is, you'll want to be able to end it in seconds.
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