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Old 03-16-2015, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,361 posts, read 4,404,971 times
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The benefit of a humidifier is that your skin doesn't dry out. That means no more fissures at the end of your fingers.

Humid air eliminates the static electricity you get by just walking across a carpeted floor and discharge with a spark by touching a lamp. It also is very good for your wood floors. Without humidity they can shrink and develop gaps.

This winter I've kept the humidity at 40% and I really enjoy the added comfort.
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Old 03-16-2015, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Colorado
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Everybody is different. Whichever one you get, make sure that it's easy to clean, the mold will get you before dry air will.

When we first moved here, I got a cold within 2 months, and lost my voice for a LONG time. Turns out, the voice came back when I got my asthma treated. I had problems in MD, too, but they were more about itchy eyes and bad allergies than asthma.

Everybody told me to try a humidifier, and at one point I was using two. It didn't help. I do much better with the straight up dry air. I'm highly allergic to molds, so that might have something to do with it.
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Old 03-16-2015, 12:30 PM
 
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I only used a humidifier for my children, and in the winter if we start to get scratchy voices in the morning.
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Old 03-16-2015, 05:10 PM
 
275 posts, read 222,783 times
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Thanks especially for the nasal spray suggestion. I remember having sinus issues the last couple of times I've been in Colorado, but didn't think much of it as it went away after a few days.
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Old 03-17-2015, 08:53 AM
 
177 posts, read 220,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
The benefit of a humidifier is that your skin doesn't dry out. That means no more fissures at the end of your fingers.

Humid air eliminates the static electricity you get by just walking across a carpeted floor and discharge with a spark by touching a lamp. It also is very good for your wood floors. Without humidity they can shrink and develop gaps.

This winter I've kept the humidity at 40% and I really enjoy the added comfort.
Agree 100%, It also helps with wood furniture in the winter too.

Make sure you do NOT get an "electrostatic"-type (ultrasonic?) one since they create a fine dust that gets on everything.

I grew up in Colorado and everyone I know has always used one in the winter months. They really do help with your health and people do not get as many colds when their sinuses are moist.

Last edited by huffdiver; 03-17-2015 at 09:04 AM..
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Old 03-17-2015, 09:48 AM
 
275 posts, read 222,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huffdiver View Post
Agree 100%, It also helps with wood furniture in the winter too.

Make sure you do NOT get an "electrostatic"-type (ultrasonic?) one since they create a fine dust that gets on everything.

I grew up in Colorado and everyone I know has always used one in the winter months. They really do help with your health and people do not get as many colds when their sinuses are moist.
Thanks, I've noticed others mention tracking the humidity level, what do you use to monitor the humidity % (or do some humidifiers already have this gauge?)?
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Old 03-18-2015, 04:08 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,361 posts, read 4,404,971 times
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I use this: http://www.amazon.com/AcuRite-00613A...rds=humidistat

I have 3 of them around the house.
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Old 03-18-2015, 10:54 AM
 
20,378 posts, read 37,934,905 times
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Search on weather stations and you'll find a variety of devices that give both indoor and outdoor readings for temp, humidity, etc. Sold by many retailers from Cabela's to Amazon to Sharper Image, etc.
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Old 03-18-2015, 01:46 PM
 
154 posts, read 117,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
I've lived here my whole life and I don't think I've ever seen a humidifier let alone used one. I guess I never understood why anyone would want/need one.

So, I don't think you have to have one, if that is what you're thinking. I don't think most people around here do nor are they common items in stores, etc. But if you want one, I'm sure you'll find something that works.
What city are you living in? It certainly can't be Colorado Springs...

I work in HVAC doing estimates, and see bypass humidifiers installed in maybe a third of the homes I walk in to (this does not include portable humidifiers, which I also see quite a lot). Maybe you don't know what they look like, thus not realizing how many people have them. They are typically installed near the furnace on the ductwork (usually the return-air drop or the supply plenum). I sell Bypass Humidifiers quite frequently to people who are tired of these issues:

-Static shocks every time you touch anybody or anything metal in the house
-Dry skin that involves buckets of lotion to repair
-Bloody noses
-Chapped lips
-Natural wood furniture and/or floors splitting from the dry air
-Allergies, which are further aggravated by dry air (the humidity range should be around 35-40% for people who suffer from allergies or asthma).

These are just some of the immediate issues that come to mind. I personally suffer from bad allergies, and cannot stand the air being too dry. My sinuses literally got destroyed by living in low humidity in the years before I got a humidifier - which has led to damage that might not ever go away (my nose never fully heals). I have a humidifier now, which has greatly helped.

For people who are sick and tired of maintaining portable humidifiers, definitely look in to a Bypass Humidifier (which is a type of whole house humidifier). It puts humidity in your entire house via the ductwork, using the furnace blower motor. They last about 10-15 years, and require very low maintenance. You only have to change a pad every 6-12 months depending on water quality. Unlike portable humidifiers, a Bypass Humidifier is very clean and does not involve refilling/replacing water. It taps in to a water source and uses water when needed automatically. A Bypass Humidifier can get your house to 35-40% humidity easily. They usually cost around $250-500, depending on what dealer you buy them from (or if you install it yourself, which I don't recommend for most people). The company I work for installs Honeywell He200 Humidifiers for most homes, and they work great. Many of our customers forget the humidifier is even there, since you don't have to change/refill any water or clean it every two days like a portable unit.

Edit: Here is what a Bypass Humidifier looks like, for those who want a visual:
http://f.tqn.com/y/homerepair/1/S/c/...ier3_noted.jpg

Last edited by Lightning_Hunter; 03-18-2015 at 02:13 PM..
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Old 03-18-2015, 02:11 PM
 
275 posts, read 222,783 times
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Thanks for the continuing thoughts all!

Lightning, it didn't occur to me that the apartments I will be looking into might already have these bypass humidifiers. I'll have to ask when I make appointments for apartment viewing.
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