U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Colorado Springs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-14-2018, 08:56 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,954,423 times
Reputation: 9437

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
You have two choices - live in a nice place which will become popular and crowded and expensive, or live in an undesirable place.

Btw, I’m waiting for all the negative comments from the lurkers who moved away and still post here.
You rang?

What about all the lurkers who moved away and now face difficulty moving back due to the astonishing costs of housing?

From what I have observed, when a national news outlet puts a city on its "10 Best List," the end is near. Look at what happened to housing costs in Salida after it got national recognition as the "coolest small town evah" to live in.

Although it was already too crowded for the likes of me, Colorado Springs was a halfway decent town when I left for what's coming to look like forever back in 2007. If I go by what old friends who have remained in the Springs are telling me, the city sounds like it's getting more than a little crowded and becoming worse with the passing of each year. Plus, I don't see the Springs doing much of anything about mass transit the way Denver has. The city bus system in Colorado Springs leaves much to be desired to put it mildly.

I also can't help but wonder what conservative Colorado Springs is going to do about air pollution from all those single occupancy commuter cars and so many of the EPA's anti-pollution regulations being rolled back. I remember what the air on the Front Range was like before emissions regulations were put into place, and it wasn't pretty. There were days when it hurt to breathe - especially in Denver, but in the Springs, as well.

Another problem is that Colorado is running out of water thanks to higher temperatures, more frequent droughts, and an influx of newcomers who insist on growing lawns comprised of Kentucky bluegrass. I feel fairly confident in predicting that water supply is going to become a major issue, if not THE major issue within the next 10 - 15 years; maybe sooner.

And then there's that urban/wildland corridor thing that has already presented Colorado Springs with two awful fires in Black Forest and Waldo Canyon. As far as I can see - which admittedly is far in Cortez, neither the county or the city seems to be doing all that much to deal with the very real threat of fires in the future - maybe in the "future" of the summer of 2018?

I will be very interested to see for myself how Colorado Springs is doing when I come back for a visit in May or June.

Cordially yours,
Lurker-who-moved-away-still-posts-here (you may call me "Lurk" for short)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-14-2018, 10:12 AM
 
642 posts, read 750,567 times
Reputation: 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
You rang?

What about all the lurkers who moved away and now face difficulty moving back due to the astonishing costs of housing?
Umm, reading this, and then reading your diatribe, can you explain why you would even want to move back to Colorado Springs?

You left over 10 years ago, and you still harp on this?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 11:19 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,954,423 times
Reputation: 9437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westbound and Down View Post
Umm, reading this, and then reading your diatribe, can you explain why you would even want to move back to Colorado Springs?

You left over 10 years ago, and you still harp on this?
Maybe because Colorado Springs is my hometown, and I've always had a grudging fondness for it despite whatever problems it may have?

It's a bit like complaining about your family. It's one thing for a family member to criticize, but a non-family member better keep their mouth shut.

My post was about the problems I see down the road if Colorado Springs continues in a path of unrestrained growth. I have been considering a possible move back there very carefully since I would prefer any upcoming move to be my final one. Therefore, I am being realistic - considering both the good and bad. It's foolish to move 400 miles across the state with my eyes closed.

I could write a post praising the Colorado Springs of yesteryear to the skies, and I suppose we could all get nostalgic about "back in the day," but that's not worth much in the here and now.

Why are you upset that I should point out the problems I see down the road for a city that I've known for 60 years now?

Cordially yours,
"Lurk"

Last edited by Colorado Rambler; 04-14-2018 at 12:01 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 12:48 PM
 
642 posts, read 750,567 times
Reputation: 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
Maybe because Colorado Springs is my hometown, and I've always had a grudging fondness for it despite whatever problems it may have?

It's a bit like complaining about your family. It's one thing for a family member to criticize, but a non-family member better keep their mouth shut.

My post was about the problems I see down the road if Colorado Springs continues in a path of unrestrained growth. I have been considering a possible move back there very carefully since I would prefer any upcoming move to be my final one. Therefore, I am being realistic - considering both the good and bad. It's foolish to move 400 miles across the state with my eyes closed.

I could write a post praising the Colorado Springs of yesteryear to the skies, and I suppose we could all get nostalgic about "back in the day," but that's not worth much in the here and now.

Why are you upset that I should point out the problems I see down the road for a city that I've known for 60 years now?

Cordially yours,
"Lurk"
But you don't live there anymore, and you really aren't qualified to comment on it the way that people who live there now do. You effectively admit this when you say that you will be interested to see how Colorado Springs is doing when you visit in May or June, an acknowledgement that you have no actual current or ongoing experience with life in the city, and it sounds like you may have not been back to the city in over 10 years.

Doesn't upset me one bit, pal. Just seems odd that you can't turn it loose, yet you comment on this thread like you are some sort of insider with fresh knowledge.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,797 posts, read 1,469,232 times
Reputation: 2906
I think the Springs has improved dramatically in the past ten years. The city is proactively fixing the roads and expanding them. Lots of new restaurants and brew pubs are opening up. The city has alot more energy and I am excited to see where it all goes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 04:44 PM
 
1,246 posts, read 1,632,269 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
...an influx of newcomers who insist on growing lawns comprised of Kentucky bluegrass.
In my hood, it's the natives and old-timers who have bluegrass lawns and water every day. As a newcomer, I would love to see more native plant xeriscaping here. The opposite, a yard full of rocks, only makes it hotter and drier, but I see that a lot here too.

Last edited by Mike from back east; 04-14-2018 at 05:48 PM.. Reason: Fixing quoted material.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 06:00 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,954,423 times
Reputation: 9437
Quote:
Originally Posted by orngkat View Post
In my hood, it's the natives and old-timers who have bluegrass lawns and water every day. As a newcomer, I would love to see more native plant xeriscaping here. The opposite, a yard full of rocks, only makes it hotter and drier, but I see that a lot here too.
I love xeriscaping put in by anyone - natives and newcomers alike. I'm looking into drought resistant plants that I can grow around my place also. Rocks suck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 07:39 PM
 
651 posts, read 341,644 times
Reputation: 761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
You rang?

What about all the lurkers who moved away and now face difficulty moving back due to the astonishing costs of housing?

From what I have observed, when a national news outlet puts a city on its "10 Best List," the end is near. Look at what happened to housing costs in Salida after it got national recognition as the "coolest small town evah" to live in.

Although it was already too crowded for the likes of me, Colorado Springs was a halfway decent town when I left for what's coming to look like forever back in 2007. If I go by what old friends who have remained in the Springs are telling me, the city sounds like it's getting more than a little crowded and becoming worse with the passing of each year. Plus, I don't see the Springs doing much of anything about mass transit the way Denver has. The city bus system in Colorado Springs leaves much to be desired to put it mildly.

I also can't help but wonder what conservative Colorado Springs is going to do about air pollution from all those single occupancy commuter cars and so many of the EPA's anti-pollution regulations being rolled back. I remember what the air on the Front Range was like before emissions regulations were put into place, and it wasn't pretty. There were days when it hurt to breathe - especially in Denver, but in the Springs, as well.

Another problem is that Colorado is running out of water thanks to higher temperatures, more frequent droughts, and an influx of newcomers who insist on growing lawns comprised of Kentucky bluegrass. I feel fairly confident in predicting that water supply is going to become a major issue, if not THE major issue within the next 10 - 15 years; maybe sooner.

And then there's that urban/wildland corridor thing that has already presented Colorado Springs with two awful fires in Black Forest and Waldo Canyon. As far as I can see - which admittedly is far in Cortez, neither the county or the city seems to be doing all that much to deal with the very real threat of fires in the future - maybe in the "future" of the summer of 2018?

I will be very interested to see for myself how Colorado Springs is doing when I come back for a visit in May or June.

Cordially yours,
Lurker-who-moved-away-still-posts-here (you may call me "Lurk" for short)
Lurk;
As someone who lived in SoCal for many years, I can say that none of the problems you mentioned have slowed down the popularity or property values in L.A. or San Diego.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 08:02 PM
 
2,771 posts, read 3,459,975 times
Reputation: 2119
Most of the residential growth will go into CS itself or just outside but how much can / will Monument / Palmer Lake take? Fountain? Peyton? Elbert, Larkspur? Ramah? Woodland Park? Pueblo / Pueblo West? Canon City? Who has water? How far will people drive? I'd imagine 300-500,000 more people are coming in or being born there over 20-30 years.


I didn't know Monument was up to about 6,500 people. Do they have lots & water left? 10k will come quick if they do. 20k possible in long-run? Peyton at 320. Hit a thousand in 5-7 years? Fountain at about 28k. Will they go to 40k by 2040? More?


Currently Colorado Springs city density is half of Denver's. Both are going up but how far? Will the gap narrow? In-fill and redevelopment at higher densities to the extent allowed / asked for by the newbies and those running development.

Last edited by NW Crow; 04-14-2018 at 08:48 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 11:11 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,954,423 times
Reputation: 9437
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
Lurk;
As someone who lived in SoCal for many years, I can say that none of the problems you mentioned have slowed down the popularity or property values in L.A. or San Diego.
Heh! Only time will tell, I suppose. I have a friend who grew up in what was then the desert in the middle of nowhere east of LA. He moved to the Springs for good some years back and tells me that he never wants to return to his old home. The constant fires and mudslides have turned places into something that looks more like one of Dante's inner circles of hell than the wonderful mountains and open country that he loved so much as a boy. That's HIS story, anyway. I couldn't say either way since I've never visited that part of the country.

I will say that BOTH Colorado and California are going to continue to struggle with increasing population density and a climate that is becoming less accommodating to both major urban centers and agriculture in the rural areas. We need to recognize the problems we face because they have already come around and started knocking on our front doors. The decisions we make now about things like population growth, affordable housing, transit and access to a dependable supply of water (to name but a few) will make all the difference in the quality of our lives tomorrow.

I'm sure that Colorado Springs and Denver will continue to attract folks from elsewhere for some years yet - but that's not going to last forever if we don't dedicate ourselves to finding good, viable solutions now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Colorado Springs
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top