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Old 04-15-2018, 01:42 AM
 
2,767 posts, read 3,453,112 times
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I didn't mention the Banning Lewis Ranch proposal. That is a big issue. Will read more about it.
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Old 04-15-2018, 02:59 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,949,899 times
Reputation: 9432
^^^

I just started to read about this. No plans for public transit; no parks? What the...? I am disabled and as a consequence, I often have to depend on public transit these days. The Banning Lewis development would hold exactly zero appeal for folks with disabilities just on the question of public transit alone. And they don't know how much TABOR will impact projected city revenues from the planned development? And where on earth are they going to get the water required for some 175,000 more people who want to plant greenery around their homes?

So, Colorado Springs is undergoing "leap frog" growth waaaaay out on the plains and now they're reneging on the 6 lane highway and want to put in just a 4 lane one instead - they should just call THAT what it will quickly become - a 4 lane parking lot.

Much as I want to give a move back to the Springs (mainly for better access to medical care) a chance, the more I learn, the more put off I become. I could easily move to a town like Cedaredge here on the Western Slope and get my medical care out of Grand Junction and fly to Denver a couple of times a year to consult with a specialist.

I can see where young families would find appeal in the Banning Lewis development - maybe, except NO PARKS? Jeeez!
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Old 04-15-2018, 04:46 AM
 
Location: Amelia Island
2,570 posts, read 3,667,680 times
Reputation: 2337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
My view is a Best Place Lists is an individual preference. A Best Place List you can bet is benefiting investors. and Real Estate Brokers. It doesn't benefit residents as populations moving in, overwhelm communities and states. Austin as well as Denver are prime examples of how, massive growth impacts residents. Constant traffic and ridiculous COL are the results.


Just take a trip to Florida cities, if you want to see what Best Place Lists create. Florida isn't making the list much anymore, other than Best Beach List.

Believe me Colorado Springs would be better off, to remain somewhat invisible to those than publish these lists. Of course we know things don't work that way. So get ready for constant population growth, and all that follows.


Good Luck
While I am not from Colorado (I have traveled around the state including Colarado Springs) I starting reading the posts and the post I have quoted above has happened to our small coastal town. While we are extremely happy in our location and this will be our final home we are now tremendously priced out of our current housing market if we were to just move here.

We continually make the lists for the beaches, tourist destinations, etc. A lot of retired boomers who you talk to here state they first came here for vacation.

Rentals and housing have soared above our income level.

My friend after spending his entire life inCalifornia is moving in close proximity to Boise, Idaho. The same effect is happening there.

People are moving to these great little areas.......I don't know if it is all about Best of Lists or just migration.
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Old 04-15-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,668 posts, read 1,666,689 times
Reputation: 2913
Banning Lewis Ranch's target market is upper middle class families. It is a master plan community that has already been approved through city, county, and state entities. That means its water requirements, for the entire project, not just the built out portion, have already been researched and approved. FWIW, El Paso County has one of the strictest planning requirements in the state; 300 years of water. Before a plan like Banning Lewis can proceed, the planners must provide a plan for access to that water. Granted, it is an intellectual proposal as physical demonstration is not possible, but, it is expected and reviewed before approval and no, I can't tell you what professional in what discipline are doing that review. The County does aggressively pursue professionals in the field as well as actual water resources to secure these approvals. That is probably not what communities in central and western CO want to hear, but it is what is happening.

Higher density housing is present and being built out at a regular pace in the central parts of the city. The refurb of the mid rise off Kiowa street and the two new ones being constructed off Nevada and Weber are steps towards this. These are all within walking distance of several co-working spaces, multiple restraunts, the public market, coffee shops, etc. I anticipate this trend will continue as there is still an amount of vacant space in the central business district.

Affordable housing is an area that needs more attention through out the city. Greccio is making moves towards this with a couple of their projects but are meeting resistance every step of the way from various neighborhood and community groups. I have some ideas and locales that I think could work nicely towards this goal, but unfortunately, I'm not a developer with millions and I still need to do some additional research into feasibility of my thoughts.
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Old 04-15-2018, 12:06 PM
 
2,767 posts, read 3,453,112 times
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Here is one article with details on Banning Lewis Ranch proposal, for those who haven't already seen it: https://m.csindy.com/coloradosprings...t?oid=10118701


If there are other good ones, posting the links would be useful for those interested in catching up about it.
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Old 04-15-2018, 12:09 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,949,899 times
Reputation: 9432
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Banning Lewis Ranch's target market is upper middle class families. It is a master plan community that has already been approved through city, county, and state entities. That means its water requirements, for the entire project, not just the built out portion, have already been researched and approved. FWIW, El Paso County has one of the strictest planning requirements in the state; 300 years of water. Before a plan like Banning Lewis can proceed, the planners must provide a plan for access to that water. Granted, it is an intellectual proposal as physical demonstration is not possible, but, it is expected and reviewed before approval and no, I can't tell you what professional in what discipline are doing that review. The County does aggressively pursue professionals in the field as well as actual water resources to secure these approvals. That is probably not what communities in central and western CO want to hear, but it is what is happening.

Higher density housing is present and being built out at a regular pace in the central parts of the city. The refurb of the mid rise off Kiowa street and the two new ones being constructed off Nevada and Weber are steps towards this. These are all within walking distance of several co-working spaces, multiple restraunts, the public market, coffee shops, etc. I anticipate this trend will continue as there is still an amount of vacant space in the central business district.

Affordable housing is an area that needs more attention through out the city. Greccio is making moves towards this with a couple of their projects but are meeting resistance every step of the way from various neighborhood and community groups. I have some ideas and locales that I think could work nicely towards this goal, but unfortunately, I'm not a developer with millions and I still need to do some additional research into feasibility of my thoughts.
Interesting. Can you provide us any links about the part of your reply that I highlighted? You seem to be implying that water will be diverted from western CO to provide for growth on the Front Range. So are we talking about diverting more water from the Colorado River here? The Yampa?

The Colorado is already way over allocated and the reservoirs at both Lake Powell and Lake Mead stubbornly continue to drop. Powell is going to fall so low that it will be at dead pool any time now, given the severity of the ongoing drought here in the southwestern part of the Upper Basin states and most all the Lower Basin.

It strikes me that Colorado Springs may end up duking it out with Phoenix and/or southern California to get more water shares from the Colorado River rather than attempting to get water from the Western Slope. Even if we wanted to, I don't see how we could send extra water to the Front Range since the Law of the River is very firm about the amount of water that the Upper Basin is required to send along to everybody and their brother downstream. The thought of sitting back and watching the Front Range cities duke it out with LA and the Imperial Valley does have a certain ironic charm, I must admit. But really?

As of today's readings (4/15/2018), the amount of water flowing into Lake Powell is a lousy 51.57% of the normal average. So how is the Banning Lewis ranch development and all the other housing developers on the Front Range going to deal with this? Inquiring minds would honestly like to know.
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Old 04-15-2018, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,786 posts, read 1,464,109 times
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I've said it before on here. California needs to stop sucking up water from the Colorado river and invest heavily in desalinization technology its the only way the growth can continue.
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Old 04-15-2018, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
9,864 posts, read 8,000,104 times
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Maybe 50 years ago.
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Old 04-15-2018, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,668 posts, read 1,666,689 times
Reputation: 2913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
^^^

I just started to read about this. No plans for public transit; no parks? What the...? I am disabled and as a consequence, I often have to depend on public transit these days. The Banning Lewis development would hold exactly zero appeal for folks with disabilities just on the question of public transit alone. And they don't know how much TABOR will impact projected city revenues from the planned development? And where on earth are they going to get the water required for some 175,000 more people who want to plant greenery around their homes?

So, Colorado Springs is undergoing "leap frog" growth waaaaay out on the plains and now they're reneging on the 6 lane highway and want to put in just a 4 lane one instead - they should just call THAT what it will quickly become - a 4 lane parking lot.

Much as I want to give a move back to the Springs (mainly for better access to medical care) a chance, the more I learn, the more put off I become. I could easily move to a town like Cedaredge here on the Western Slope and get my medical care out of Grand Junction and fly to Denver a couple of times a year to consult with a specialist.

I can see where young families would find appeal in the Banning Lewis development - maybe, except NO PARKS? Jeeez!
FWIW, there are already a couple thousands acres of development in BLR. There is infrastructure being put down, numerous homes are in place, schools, parks (quite a few actually), community center, a small water park, accessible school, and more. You only need visit their website to see what already is in place in the developing areas. http://www.banninglewisranch.com/


Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
Interesting. Can you provide us any links about the part of your reply that I highlighted? You seem to be implying that water will be diverted from western CO to provide for growth on the Front Range. So are we talking about diverting more water from the Colorado River here? The Yampa?

The Colorado is already way over allocated and the reservoirs at both Lake Powell and Lake Mead stubbornly continue to drop. Powell is going to fall so low that it will be at dead pool any time now, given the severity of the ongoing drought here in the southwestern part of the Upper Basin states and most all the Lower Basin.

It strikes me that Colorado Springs may end up duking it out with Phoenix and/or southern California to get more water shares from the Colorado River rather than attempting to get water from the Western Slope. Even if we wanted to, I don't see how we could send extra water to the Front Range since the Law of the River is very firm about the amount of water that the Upper Basin is required to send along to everybody and their brother downstream. The thought of sitting back and watching the Front Range cities duke it out with LA and the Imperial Valley does have a certain ironic charm, I must admit. But really?

As of today's readings (4/15/2018), the amount of water flowing into Lake Powell is a lousy 51.57% of the normal average. So how is the Banning Lewis ranch development and all the other housing developers on the Front Range going to deal with this? Inquiring minds would honestly like to know.
That may take me some time to dig up the answers to that in documentation that is linkable. My father has been a land planner since the mid 1970s, so I've seen and heard about a variety of these deals, changes in rules, and pros and cons of various issues throughout most of my life. When plans for multi-thousand acre developments are going together, it is not something where you can just pull up PPRBD guidelines to see where you fall and make adjustments. As evidenced by the BLR issues in the Indy linked article above, politics is as much a part of development as actual planning and sometimes the specifics are buried deep within encyclopedia sized contracts that are not publicly searchable.

As far as water issues, Cos along with any number of Front Range entities, are regularly looking into and for rights purchases. That doesn't always mean they are negotiating huge shares from primary watersheds but also pursuing individual rights from landowners willing to unload them. These also reach further east than the Rockies on to the plains where an even greater number of farmers are willing to sell off rights and have been doing so over the last 50 years. A 1000 senior rights each on a 1000 acre run adds up over time without having to negotiate with Arizona and California. Also, and I'll admit some incomplete understanding on my part, could be access to rights held but never exercised. General Palmer was very forward thinking and knew well the need for secure rights for water his little village that was not on any major waterway. His experience with railroads and right of ways gave him great insight into water and rights and the need to get these while the getting was good. While I'm sure he never ever dreamed of a 1 million people in his Little London, he knew it did require water and plenty of it.
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Old 04-15-2018, 08:10 PM
 
646 posts, read 340,114 times
Reputation: 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by BornintheSprings View Post
I've said it before on here. California needs to stop sucking up water from the Colorado river and invest heavily in desalinization technology its the only way the growth can continue.
Carlsbad Desal Plant - Home

And Arizona with the lowest rainfall, covered with golf courses and swimming pools.
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