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Old 05-21-2018, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,888 posts, read 8,873,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wong21fr View Post
You have Park Meadows, CC, and the FlatIrons in Denver that are malls that do particularly well. All three are regional destinations that pull in population not just from the metro area of 3 million but from the entire state and surrounding states.

Colorado Springs has a population of less than 500K- El Paso County has less than 700K. You're simply too small to support a regional shopping center like Park Meadows.
And yet we support mile after mile of strip malls.
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Old 05-21-2018, 10:19 AM
 
874 posts, read 923,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
And yet we support mile after mile of strip malls.
So does the Denver area, as does Castle Rock. But you're asking why COS can't support a massive, shiny, mega-mall that pulls in people for hundreds of miles away.
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Old 05-21-2018, 10:36 AM
 
5,006 posts, read 6,683,532 times
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The Park Meadows area is generally quite a bit more affluent than most of Colorado Springs, as well. The median household income there is about $110,000 vs. a bit less than half that in Colorado Springs. People have more expendable income to blow there and are more likely to buy from higher-end name-brand stores that typically are in such malls. Most successful malls (vs. strip malls) that are successful today are associated with relatively affluent areas where shopping is a more reasonable hobby vs. folks just trying to survive and pay the rent.
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Old 05-21-2018, 11:21 AM
 
808 posts, read 1,175,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
The promenade is nothing but a strip mall. I hate strip malls.

The one store at Park Meadows I couldn't understand was a technology store -- packed to the hilt -- but it had no identifying name to it. Weird.
You're really splitting hairs here. Personally I tend to cringe at BOTH strip malls AND traditional malls, the only difference I can see between the two is that strip malls tend to have outdoor parking and store entrances and traditional malls have both inside/outside parking and primarily indoor store entrances. Almost nothing is more vulgar on this earth than a traditional mall food court, including the one at Park Meadows. Shudder.


As others have pointed out, Denver is FULL of dead and dying smaller/older malls almost identical to the Citadel out by Platte and Academy. The Chapel Hills mall is still reasonably functional compared to most of the dying or dead malls in Denver.


Griping that Colorado Springs doesn't have a Park Meadows is basically like griping that we don't have an NFL team and going on about how great a time you had at the Broncos game and their awesome new stadium and complaining we don't have that here. Or light rail. Or 60 story tall downtown buildings. Or a brand new international-quality art museum or performance center that seats 5,000.


People who want those things need to live in Denver (or Dallas or Chicago or Los Angeles) and take the bad of those huge cities along with the good. I used to live in Denver (1996-1999) and enjoyed having access to the good of a huge congested expensive city. I couldn't stand having to spend 30 minutes to an hour in traffic to get ANYWHERE from ANYWHERE in the greater Denver area. In Colorado Springs I live in the foothills with a nice view of the city, a 12 minute commute to my downtown office, the highest-rated school district in Colorado, the quality-of-life list goes on, including the freedom to NOT frequent hideous malls either here or in Denver.


As you can tell I mostly abhor shopping and when I absolutely "must" I'll bend over backwards to go to local places, many of which can be found downtown, Old Colorado City, etc. When that doesn't cut it, I like the new University Village shops on North Nevada well enough. Certainly no "less nice" than Park Meadows for 97% of items one might want. Also has a Costco and Trader Joe's at which one can actually park, unlike the one's I've tried to go to in Denver.


Sorry, not trying to scold, just pointing out that Denver and COS are two entirely different cities, thank goodness. You could not pay me enough to go back and live in Denver. Shudder. Not for the handful of posh malls, not for the nifty new sports arenas, not for any of the other congested nightmares ... ahem "big-city amenities." For some of us, a city of 500K or so is just about the perfect size. Less congestion and no monster commutes for 365 days a year. For the once or twice a year (or never) we need a "big mall" then up to Denver to fight traffic we go. Presto. Perfect.
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Old 05-21-2018, 12:05 PM
 
5,445 posts, read 4,395,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
The promenade is nothing but a strip mall. I hate strip malls.

The one store at Park Meadows I couldn't understand was a technology store -- packed to the hilt -- but it had no identifying name to it. Weird.
I think you might be talking about the Microsoft store. All they have is their Windows logo above the store entrance.
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Old 05-21-2018, 12:47 PM
Status: "Goodbye fall ... hello winter" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Manitou Springs
924 posts, read 1,031,388 times
Reputation: 810
Quote:
Originally Posted by smdensbcs View Post
You're really splitting hairs here. Personally I tend to cringe at BOTH strip malls AND traditional malls, the only difference I can see between the two is that strip malls tend to have outdoor parking and store entrances and traditional malls have both inside/outside parking and primarily indoor store entrances. Almost nothing is more vulgar on this earth than a traditional mall food court, including the one at Park Meadows. Shudder.


As others have pointed out, Denver is FULL of dead and dying smaller/older malls almost identical to the Citadel out by Platte and Academy. The Chapel Hills mall is still reasonably functional compared to most of the dying or dead malls in Denver.


Griping that Colorado Springs doesn't have a Park Meadows is basically like griping that we don't have an NFL team and going on about how great a time you had at the Broncos game and their awesome new stadium and complaining we don't have that here. Or light rail. Or 60 story tall downtown buildings. Or a brand new international-quality art museum or performance center that seats 5,000.


People who want those things need to live in Denver (or Dallas or Chicago or Los Angeles) and take the bad of those huge cities along with the good. I used to live in Denver (1996-1999) and enjoyed having access to the good of a huge congested expensive city. I couldn't stand having to spend 30 minutes to an hour in traffic to get ANYWHERE from ANYWHERE in the greater Denver area. In Colorado Springs I live in the foothills with a nice view of the city, a 12 minute commute to my downtown office, the highest-rated school district in Colorado, the quality-of-life list goes on, including the freedom to NOT frequent hideous malls either here or in Denver.


As you can tell I mostly abhor shopping and when I absolutely "must" I'll bend over backwards to go to local places, many of which can be found downtown, Old Colorado City, etc. When that doesn't cut it, I like the new University Village shops on North Nevada well enough. Certainly no "less nice" than Park Meadows for 97% of items one might want. Also has a Costco and Trader Joe's at which one can actually park, unlike the one's I've tried to go to in Denver.


Sorry, not trying to scold, just pointing out that Denver and COS are two entirely different cities, thank goodness. You could not pay me enough to go back and live in Denver. Shudder. Not for the handful of posh malls, not for the nifty new sports arenas, not for any of the other congested nightmares ... ahem "big-city amenities." For some of us, a city of 500K or so is just about the perfect size. Less congestion and no monster commutes for 365 days a year. For the once or twice a year (or never) we need a "big mall" then up to Denver to fight traffic we go. Presto. Perfect.
Ditto.

Besides, I like supporting what little is left of locally owned businesses/restaurants when I can. I haven't stepped foot in a mall in years - actually Park Meadows was it, and that was only to see what the big deal was about IKEA.

I can't think of anything I can't find in stores locally (or online) that I'd need (or want) to go to a mall for.
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Old 05-21-2018, 01:47 PM
 
5,006 posts, read 6,683,532 times
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I do a lot of my shopping online and I am sure the increased percentage of sales online also has affected the trajectory of a lot of malls so that now they are largely the purview of primarily heavily populated and relatively affluent communities. Why buy something at a mall if I can find it online cheaper or with the convenience of not having to go out to the mall but instead have it come right to my doorstep for the same price?
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Old 05-21-2018, 01:50 PM
 
331 posts, read 163,698 times
Reputation: 532
Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
I do a lot of my shopping online and I am sure the increased percentage of sales online also has affected the trajectory of a lot of malls so that now they are largely the purview of primarily heavily populated and relatively affluent communities. Why buy something at a mall if I can find it online cheaper or with the convenience of not having to go out to the mall but instead have it come right to my doorstep for the same price?
And with one of the highest tax rates in the state now (in CS) it is usually ALWAYS cheaper to buy on-line.

You also don't have to deal with the I-25 stop and go traffic either- a win/win!
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Old 05-21-2018, 02:32 PM
 
5,445 posts, read 4,395,755 times
Reputation: 14992
Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
I do a lot of my shopping online and I am sure the increased percentage of sales online also has affected the trajectory of a lot of malls so that now they are largely the purview of primarily heavily populated and relatively affluent communities. Why buy something at a mall if I can find it online cheaper or with the convenience of not having to go out to the mall but instead have it come right to my doorstep for the same price?
I agree. Some stuff I'll buy online, but one thing I'll never buy online are clothes outside of socks and the like. Sizes vary, fitment varies, and quality varies. Heck, even the color varies when looking at it in store versus an online picture. The only time I'll buy clothes online is if it is direct from the retailer and it is a replacement item so I know exactly what I am getting. For instance, I bought a shirt from the LLBean store at the Park Meadows mall and loved it. On their website, they had the same shirt but in a different pattern so I bought the second one from their website and had it shipped to my house for free.


The same applies for shoes. I'll never buy shoes online again due to fitment, quality, etc.
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Old 05-21-2018, 03:12 PM
 
608 posts, read 319,980 times
Reputation: 824
This might be an, "outsider," opinion, but I

1. Didn't visit the Citadel the first year we lived here after being told how awful the area was.

2. Thought Chapel Hills was a major disappointment.

3. Finally visited the Citadel after the Barnes & Nobel a few times nearby seemed very nice and found it:
A: Less deserted and just as nice as Chapel Hills.
B: A step above the Aurora Mall - maybe a few.

Colorado Springs is such an interesting place.
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