U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Colorado Springs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-12-2018, 11:35 AM
Status: "Goodbye fall ... hello winter" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Manitou Springs
924 posts, read 1,030,894 times
Reputation: 810

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Agree with a lot of this.

BTW, CO minimum wage is scheduled to reach $12 by 2020 due to Amendment 70 effective Jan 2017. It has/is increasing $.90 annual until it reaches $12.
And so will the cost of living (increase), beyond what $12 an hour can pay for. Minimum wage isn't a living wage now, and it won't be in 2 years, either. Until something is done to get serious about housing for low-income persons, if you work minimum wage jobs, a roof over your head will always be a challenge.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-13-2018, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Colorado
9,734 posts, read 6,269,187 times
Reputation: 17549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Bill, that's a good statistic. Here's the original source of it, the Brookings Institute.

I surely agree that teen pregnancy is a near-certain path to poverty; kids having kids. When I used to hangout in downtown COLO SPGS near City Hall, there was a 7-11 about two blocks south where I'd go for a soda pop. Always a lot of homeless dudes hanging around there, but almost totally males, very few females. It's easy for me to relate teen pregnancy to poverty but hard to relate teen pregnancy to homelessness when the vast majority of the homeless and panhandlers that I saw were males.

If I were king of this place, I'd pound several messages into the minds of teens (regardless of what parents or 'religious leaders' want them to know). We must equip the younger generations for success:
- sex education
- birth control education
- birth control products available and covered by health insurance
- what are parental responsibilities and realities
- cost of raising a child
- impacts of not having a HS diploma
- money management and how to run a checkbook
- life planning to include a plan for retirement, even if only a teen

I'm tired of seeing kids graduate with more knowledge of cartoon superheroes than how Wall Street works.
There is another change I'd like to see, Mike, another thing our kids need to learn...but it is incredibly hard to teach them. I am definitely trying, with my sons.

One problem with growing up with no good models of healthy relationships, like many kids of divorced parents or single parents, what have you, is that they (we) don't learn normal, healthy things about how and why to partner up with another person. We come into adulthood believing that our VALUE as a human being, is tied very directly to getting someone to love us. That goes for young men and young women both.

Pregnancy when people aren't ready for it, can really set ya back. Even now, I've got a pretty good job, I think my pay is decent, but I have meticulously figured up my financials in very complex spreadsheets (it's kind of my thing) and one of my sons, the 19 year old, has cost me on average just over $500/month this year, and the 16 year old has cost me on average about $630/month this year. In direct costs. Not a share of rent, I'd be paying that anyways. I'm talking about their food, clothes, medical bills, school supplies, a small share for utility usage, cell phones (the service and when they needed new devices) and just...the costs that would not be there if they kid were out on his own. And just think, I don't pay for daycare or diapers anymore! I was getting a bargain at $300/week for daycare back in the day.

People will say, "Well if you weren't ready to have kids maybe you should have kept your legs shut" but my god, really, you are saying with that, that only the rich deserve love. Because no way could I be in a relationship with a man and not be giving him sex, especially if I hoped he would live with me and help me survive. Would you love a young woman who did not give you sex, guys? Would you? Just about everyone wants to be loved. Just about everyone will try to find that and have that. And birth control...well, we were using condoms. They failed.

Thing is...on the one hand, being a very young mother (not a teen mom, but close) was part of the picture of my poverty, and yet in another way, it was the biggest reason I worked so hard to climb out. Wanting a better life for your babies will prevent you from giving up, it will make you fight tooth and nail.

Looking at my sons as young men now, I think... If I were a young man, thinking strategically, I would avoid serious relationships and make really really sure that if I had sex with anyone, our birth control game were multifaceted and on-point, and I'd work though whatever college or trade school, whatever got me on the path to making money, and I wouldn't even consider getting married or even having a serious relationship, until my feet were solidly on the path. Guess I'd give the same advice to a young woman, too (though I have no daughters.)

But it is a real struggle to get into my sons' heads that they don't need a girlfriend, let alone a wife, to be valuable, complete and worthy human beings. To put more energy and focus into grades, training, work...and the search for love can wait. I know that youth and hormones are part of that, but social messages are part of it, too. A "love interest" angle is part of damn near every story you get fed your whole life in America. Hero gets the girl and all that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2018, 12:42 PM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,790,850 times
Reputation: 18081
Sonic, indeed so. Need to teach young guys to respect the girls in their lives and to protect them in every way. That includes wearing a condom, whether she says she's on the pill or not. Need to educate boys that their lovers are the best friends they'll ever have so treat them with respect and you'll never be alone. Need to impress upon them that the crap they see on adult websites is NOT how to view girls and not how to treat them.

I thoroughly dislike the view of some evangelicals that birth control pills and such are the equivalent to murder, that is total crap. These neanderthal views add to the problem of keeping people ignorant and leads to more unwanted pregnancies and abortions which they say they want to reduce and stop. Giving people the truth and the means to do proper family planning will reduce the rate of abortion and we've seen this in various studies where quality products were made available to people. Sadly, the GOP cut off funding for more birth control products for these pilot programs. Seems some people just want to punish girls for loving someone, how sad is that.

The fewer unwanted babies we bring into the world the fewer people we'll have camping near the creeks.

This is but one aspect of the homeless problem; there are other aspects too. Who knew homelessness was so complicated.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2018, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Colorado
9,734 posts, read 6,269,187 times
Reputation: 17549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Sonic, indeed so. Need to teach young guys to respect the girls in their lives and to protect them in every way. That includes wearing a condom, whether she says she's on the pill or not. Need to educate boys that their lovers are the best friends they'll ever have so treat them with respect and you'll never be alone. Need to impress upon them that the crap they see on adult websites is NOT how to view girls and not how to treat them.

I thoroughly dislike the view of some evangelicals that birth control pills and such are the equivalent to murder, that is total crap. These neanderthal views add to the problem of keeping people ignorant and leads to more unwanted pregnancies and abortions which they say they want to reduce and stop. Giving people the truth and the means to do proper family planning will reduce the rate of abortion and we've seen this in various studies where quality products were made available to people. Sadly, the GOP cut off funding for more birth control products for these pilot programs. Seems some people just want to punish girls for loving someone, how sad is that.

The fewer unwanted babies we bring into the world the fewer people we'll have camping near the creeks.

This is but one aspect of the homeless problem; there are other aspects too. Who knew homelessness was so complicated.
Yes. Well, and to further complicate matters...(lol!)...

Even if unplanned pregnancy isn't part of the picture, I would say, how many young people couple up with the first person who shows them love and attention and affection, when either or both are too young to truly know themselves? How many have partners who are bad news, who bring bad habits and poor life choices into their homes and lives, and steer them into bad outcomes? Abusive partners? Breakups that destroy their mental health and ability to cope, even if only temporarily?

I just see this desperate need to make a romantic partner the center of one's identity as generally kind of unhealthy. Or very unhealthy, sometimes. Especially when people don't have the wisdom or life experience to choose that partner with care and caution and sense.

I feel like a lot of homeless...each has their story. You have everything from veterans with PTSD or other mental health problems or those who are just suffering mental illness that they have, and they don't have good care for that. And you have people who were doing well one minute, and then something happened and they weren't prepared to handle it, and their ability to cope and live normal lives crashed and burned. People whose medical bills bankrupted them, people who were devastated by loss or a breakup, people who just somehow can't seem to cope with anything like normal life. I know a guy who has been on-and-off homeless, whose M.O. is to charm people into taking care of him, until he wears out his welcome and has to find a new home to take him in...if no one will, he ends up on the streets. And I know a lot of people whose story of homelessness has a lot to do with marijuana. While I do believe it should be legal for a number of reasons, I don't think that having a daily habit is a very good idea, for an awful lot of people who do that. I've seen it erode the overall life skills of otherwise functional adults. And I've seen plenty of people migrate to legal pot states with no other plan but a passion for weed and a belief that this passion will somehow feed them. Funny how a basic love for using the stuff, doesn't necessarily qualify a person to grow it, or sell it.

And then there's the mentality I grew up with, that your career is this magical thing and you can be or do anything, and it should fulfill your soul! "What do you want to be? You can be anything!" Well...in reality you might not make a decent living doing what you're passionate about, and the world needs workers who are willing to do lots of things that practically no one is passionate about. That ties into the whole "useless college degrees" thing. It's why I nudged my older son toward the trades. He's math smart, but not a great essay-writer, which means that an academic degree program may have led him to frustration and maybe not success. I have been trying to instill a bit more realism in my sons, than what many parents did with my generation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2018, 10:20 AM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,790,850 times
Reputation: 18081
Sonic, thanks again for another great posting; there's a great deal of humanitarian wisdom in your words, if only our society could get some traction for those truly in need of help.
__________________
- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
- Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
- Thank you and enjoy City-Data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2018, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,326 posts, read 4,350,986 times
Reputation: 15248
https://www.krdo.com/news/top-storie...reek/785945501

Now the police are starting to enforce the new law. But there is still no solution. Those folks will most likely just relocate to another illegal camping spot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2018, 02:50 AM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,864 posts, read 7,096,377 times
Reputation: 1543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
This is long but here goes:

Well, since Mike and Sonic Spark shared their stories, I’ll share a little of mine. About 15 years ago, I came down with a mysterious illness. It started with a bunch of vague symptoms like headaches, tachycardia , and blurred vision. I went to the doctor who could find nothing wrong and told me that it was just “nerves.”

Maybe it was nerves. At the time I had a very demanding job as the director of the library at Denver Botanic Gardens. I was living in the Springs and commuting back and forth to Denver every single day. Even back then that commute just sucked with drivers forming crazed wolf backs and doing 80mph bumper to bumper. A driver who tried to obey the speed limits and maintain a safe driving distance often became the object of someone’s road rage, so I gritted my teeth and drove with the wolves, white knuckling it the entire way.

Between that horrid commute and long hours at work, I didn’t have much time to live an actual life and the stress was just awful. I decided to resign from my job and look for work in the Springs. I was confident I could find a job back in the Springs since I had a good resume and plenty of experience. Plus, I had my savings and was eligible for temporary health care thru COBRA. No big deal, really.

The thing was that after I quit my job, I got sicker. The headaches got worse, and they began to happen closer and closer together. At night my heart would pound so much that I thought I was having a panic attack. I was often nauseated and I seemed to have no energy. I couldn’t seem to focus properly or concentrate, and I began making the rounds of doctors in earnest.

When my COBRA ran out, I had to pay my medical bills out of pocket. I was sick as a dog and couldn’t work, so I began to run through my savings to pay my rent and buy food. Things were getting desperate. A friend of mind fell into the habit of dropping by to check on me, and one day she announced that she thought she smelled gas in my house, and told me I should call up public utilities. I brushed her off, but she kept nagging at me until I finally called just to shut her up.

It was December and snowing out the afternoon, I called. The utility guy eventually located my address and came in to check the air in my house. His carbon monoxide detector literally began to shriek, and he had me get out of the house and stand in the snow while he flung open all the windows and shut down my furnace. I had both a natural gas leak (the source of the odor), and the ancient furnace was burning improperly and had been emitting high amounts of (odorless) carbon monoxide for a long time – months. I had a CO detector but unknown to me, it didn’t work correctly.

The utility technician told me that I should be dead. With a reading of 400ppm CO in my air, I certainly would have died that night or the next. Well, obviously, I didn’t die, but I sustained anoxic brain damage from lack of oxygen. I recovered to a certain amount, but much of the damage is permanent. I have the short-term memory of a butterfly and my executive function is a joke because I can’t sustain the concentration to complete even the simplest of tasks.

I was referred to a very expensive specialist and again I paid for doctor visits and prescriptions out of pocket. Eventually I ran through my savings, and I couldn’t hold down the simplest of jobs because I was so slow in completing tasks – that executive function thing again. Still I considered going on SSDI a personal defeat. I’d worked from age 16 on; worked to help cover my college expenses and got a scholarship to cover tuition. The last thing I wanted to do was to be forced to live off the government dole. So I kept trying to work and I kept getting fired. Finally my same friend came over and dragged me down to the social security offices on Academy and helped me apply for SSDI.

It was a long process for me thanks to my cognition difficulties and in the middle of it all, I got evicted because I could no longer pay my rent. I was suddenly homeless and completely terrified. I knew that as a single woman and with a brain injury at that, I’d be mincemeat on Colorado Springs mean streets. I had a beat up old Ford Explorer with my camping gear stashed in back, some clothing and my beloved orange cat. A friend loaned me $200 bucks for gas and me and kitty (aptly named “Traveler”) literally headed for the hills – or mountains in this case.

I drove west as fast as I could and ran out of gas about 30 miles north of Telluride. Thank God it was summer. I found myself a very secluded campsite on BLM land and pitched my tent next to the San Miguel River. My new home was beautiful and vast. It was also often scary at night, but eventually I settled in and learned to recognize which noises in the dark were nothing and which I should be alert for. Traveler was a great help. He took to camping like he’d been doing it all of his 9 lives, and I would watch him for his responses, figuring his 6th sense of things would get us both through any difficulty.

I kept clean with an icy dip into the San Miguel every morning. I was maybe 20 miles as the crow flies from the town of Norwood and when I had the money for gas, I went into town to the Laundromat and to use the computer at Norwood’s tiny public library. Once a month the local church gave out boxes of food. I made friends with the librarian and the editor of the local paper who generously paid me to write up my story which he put on the front page!

I also contrived to run a small business selling flowers on Friday and Saturday nights at Telluride’s bars and restaurants. This gave me a little money in my pocket for gas and the washer/driers at the Norwood Laundromat. I might be camped on the San Miguel to this very day except for this little thing called winter in the Colorado Mountains which scared me almost as much as being homeless in Colorado Springs.

Traveler and I were very lucky thanks in large part to the kindness of the people who lived in Norwood and the tiny town of Nucla just down the road. I put in applications for help all summer and finally toward the end of October – it was starting to get pretty cold already – I was awarded a rural development apartment in an affordable housing 10-plex in Nucla. My next door neighbors found me a couch which looked brand new; the librarian gave me a very comfy bed and the young man on the other side of me was a hunter who dropped by with some delicious elk steaks for me and Traveler to eat.

It had been a long and very difficult journey. So many times I just wanted to quit – to lay down one night and never wake up. But I couldn’t abandon Traveler to his fate in the forest, so I hung on. That December I had my SSDI hearing before an administrative judge in Grand Junction. He ruled in my favor, and I went up to Telluride to celebrate with lunch and a scenic free ride on the gondola. I checked out the Telluride free box and discovered that someone had dropped off about 50 barely played with stuffed animals. I scooped them all up and put them in the back of my Explorer and drove back to the little church in Norwood that gave out the food boxes. I donated my treasure trove of stuffed animals to the little kids who came with their families to get their December food boxes.

It was one of the best Christmases I’ve ever had, and I finally felt like a human being again - a member of a community with a roof over my head and the chance to pay it forward with some stranger's discarded stuffed animal collection which delighted those little kids no end.

I feel that the majority of homeless people are no different than I was - just down on their luck, maybe unable to work due to some medical condition and longing to be a actual member of the human race again.
Wow. Mad respect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado > Colorado Springs
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top