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Old 07-18-2018, 08:08 PM
 
20,360 posts, read 37,902,723 times
Reputation: 18163

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Here's a better chart that breaks down by type of taxes all of the taxes paid in each state. Note this chart does not include Federal income tax as that's standard across all states.

https://static.seekingalpha.com/uplo...6461460457.png

In this chart Colorado is 38th, Illinois is 1st, New York is 4th, and surprisingly California is 43rd.
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Old 07-18-2018, 09:04 PM
 
61 posts, read 79,396 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Here's a better chart that breaks down by type of taxes all of the taxes paid in each state. Note this chart does not include Federal income tax as that's standard across all states.

https://static.seekingalpha.com/uplo...6461460457.png

In this chart Colorado is 38th, Illinois is 1st, New York is 4th, and surprisingly California is 43rd.
Thanks.

I wish that whoever loaded this chart up to SeekingAlpha had indicated somewhere on the chart where it originated. It looks legit but without knowing the actual source, one can't be sure.
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Old 07-18-2018, 09:16 PM
 
61 posts, read 79,396 times
Reputation: 50
Did a little googling and found this compilation of total statewide taxes by type in table form:

https://wallethub.com/edu/states-wit...-burden/20494/


EDIT: Had a PM that I didn't check before posting this. Turns out the City-Data member had already sent me this exact link!

Last edited by Wolfcamp; 07-18-2018 at 09:26 PM..
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Old 07-18-2018, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Colorado
666 posts, read 349,356 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfcamp View Post
Did a little googling and found this compilation of total statewide taxes by type in table form:

https://wallethub.com/edu/states-wit...-burden/20494/


EDIT: Had a PM that I didn't check before posting this. Turns out the City-Data member had already sent me this exact link!
A more believable graph.
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Old 07-18-2018, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Colorado
666 posts, read 349,356 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Here's a better chart that breaks down by type of taxes all of the taxes paid in each state. Note this chart does not include Federal income tax as that's standard across all states.

https://static.seekingalpha.com/uplo...6461460457.png

In this chart Colorado is 38th, Illinois is 1st, New York is 4th, and surprisingly California is 43rd.
Problem with California is that because of prop 13, property tax is quite variable.
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Old 07-18-2018, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Colorado
666 posts, read 349,356 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
As it should be, though I'd prefer an initial construction fee for each SFH or TH and a fee per dwelling unit in multi-family apartment and condo units. There's a notable cost to add new dwelling units to the city's infrastructure and IIRC that exact amount is a bigger secret than the nuclear codes. If it were more expensive to buy a new home the prices of existing used homes could rise a bit, but if taxpayers keep subsidizing new construction than the existing homeowners see their prices stay stagnant. At least that's my perception of it.
I wonder how fair this is? It has become standard, but did it occur 30 yrs ago, 50 yrs ago etc or did new infrastructure at that time get paid for by the city? By taxpayers everywhere?
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Old 07-19-2018, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,689 posts, read 1,695,990 times
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Developers have typically always had some amount of payments for some level of infrastructure, but that amount in both structure and payment has evolved over time from when the city was trying to attract people to move here to the current atmosphere where more people are moving here faster than we can put up houses for them.
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Old 07-19-2018, 12:53 PM
 
20,360 posts, read 37,902,723 times
Reputation: 18163
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
I wonder how fair this is? It has become standard, but did it occur 30 yrs ago, 50 yrs ago etc or did new infrastructure at that time get paid for by the city? By taxpayers everywhere?
Dr. Dog, the fairness issue is one where I see no clear answer, but then again I'm not a developer or a city manager. I don't know what the city did in the past, but I've a perception that many people feel builders pay too little.

The mayor and city council have a painful choice to make; i.e., do we charge new building lots the "full load" of added infrastructure costs or do we charge a "reasonable" fee and let the general population pay the rest. No mayor can please everyone in this matter and whatever a mayor might do probably will please very few people.

It won't be easy to calculate any amount to claim $NN,NNN is the fair price to cover the "full load" that new development brings. There are costs to roads, schools, gas, electric, water, sewer lines, sewage treatment plants, EMTs, police, fire, courts, jails, parks and recreation, code enforcement, social services, storm water runoff, environments, and general administrative overhead. Almost a fools errand to try reaching a definitive answer on what it costs every time the population adds another thousand souls to the city's human total. I think they could get close to a number that approaches a position that is viable and defensible, but I bet it would make developers howl.

The other side of the coin is do we just pick a number, go with it, and let general tax revenues pay for whatever it costs to run the city and let everyone benefit indirectly as the city grows.

I favor a fairly stiff up front fee. It may make new homes more expensive but that means owners of existing homes may have a bit of an edge if they choose to sell. The more expensive a new home the more attractive the price of our existing homes will seem to newcomers.
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Old 07-19-2018, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,627 posts, read 5,913,380 times
Reputation: 6971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfcamp View Post
Did a little googling and found this compilation of total statewide taxes by type in table form:

https://wallethub.com/edu/states-wit...-burden/20494/


EDIT: Had a PM that I didn't check before posting this. Turns out the City-Data member had already sent me this exact link!
So I check the methodology and here’s what it says:

Quote:
Methodology
In order to determine the states that tax their residents the most and least aggressively, WalletHub compared the 50 states across the following three tax burdens and added the results to obtain the overall tax burden for each state:

-Property Tax as a Share of Personal Income
-Individual Income Tax as a Share of Personal Income
-Total Sales & Excise Tax as a Share of Personal Income
I get number one, but shouldn’t individual income tax as a share of personal income be the same as the income tax rate? What am I missing here?
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Old 07-21-2018, 11:08 AM
 
25,905 posts, read 49,920,525 times
Reputation: 19378
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
Problem with California is that because of prop 13, property tax is quite variable.
Prop 13 has added tremendous stability to taxes...

Prop 13 takes the guess work out of taxes and voters must approve special assessments... like 55% to build or repair schools.
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