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Old 07-22-2018, 08:34 AM
 
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Hey all, was wondering if you guys have any success growing fruits or veggies outdoors in Colorado springs? I tried a few but just doesnt seem to work for me. Maybe the weeds are the problems? Again this is for outdoors

Do you guys have any recommendations what does well in our dry weather? My soil is also very dry, but I am going to try a watering irrigation system to see if that will help.

If so, what have you guys grown? what can I plant around this time (july aug)
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:21 AM
 
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You can get a lot of great info from the Colorado State University Extension Office. Also the local horticultural society. And most of our nurseries - we get really good advice from Spencer's Lawn and Garden.

I only do a little but I have some friends who really have a green thumb.

First of all, certain plants do well here and others do not. Lettuce and carrots, for example, tend to do pretty well.

As for something to plant this time of year, I honestly think you are likely too late for our growing season. Planting for most things needs to happen in May here. However, if you go buy some that are already growing from a good nursery you may be able to get those to fruition. I don't know anyone that does mid-summer planting here, although some do planting in the fall for next spring. But it may be I just don't know the folks who do it. Here is a planting time chart - https://garden.org/apps/calendar/?q=...do+Springs,+CO

As for fruit trees, again what you plant may determine how well it does. Here is some info on what might be better for the Front Range - https://gazette.com/news/front-range...4b327ace9.html
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:31 AM
 
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thank you! Ive heard lettuce does pretty good as well. I am wondering if I can try it inside a pot.

Thanks for the info!!
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willc86 View Post
thank you! Ive heard lettuce does pretty good as well. I am wondering if I can try it inside a pot.

Thanks for the info!!
Yes, I think you can grow it in a pot!
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:44 AM
 
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I had a 100% failure rate when I tried to garden w/o a drip system. With a drip, you can plant anything rated for your hardiness zone. There will be other challenges, deer, wind, hail, etc,etc but you’ll just have the deal with them. I’m building a greenhouse which will really allow me to grow anything. Looking forward to growing oranges this winter.
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AsFarSouthAsSouthGoes View Post
I had a 100% failure rate when I tried to garden w/o a drip system. With a drip, you can plant anything rated for your hardiness zone. There will be other challenges, deer, wind, hail, etc,etc but youíll just have the deal with them. Iím building a greenhouse which will really allow me to grow anything. Looking forward to growing oranges this winter.
I think you are right. I think I am going to go for a small green house and try it that way. Where I live, we get hail often, so I am scared that will kill the plants
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:59 AM
 
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You won't have much luck growing fruits and veggies in this climate without watering them, perhaps even daily during the hottest part of the summer. You may also need to work on your soil, adding compost, iron (especially if you have alkaline clay soil), fertilizer, etc before planting season. Growing things in containers or raised beds with imported soil is an alternative to dealing with the crap topsoil that is so common here.

It's too late to plant things that require a long growing season and/or heat to to ripen, unless you can find something like a potted tomato plant that's already setting fruit. Green beans might work. You could also plant a fall crop of leafy vegetables like lettuce or spinach -- they prefer cooler weather so better to hold off a bit on those.

Late summer and early fall is also a great time to plant fruit trees, although of course you won't get anything to harvest for a few years.
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Old 07-22-2018, 10:10 AM
 
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If you plant right now, plant something with less than 60 days to maturity or plants that are already pretty big.


Zucchini does well for me. Radishes, basil, cucumbers. Lots of people do tomatoes and peppers. Some gets results, a lot don't. Tomatillos, cilantro did ok.


Lettuce, carrots were duds for me. The small amount of eggplant I tried didn't produce much. Spinach ok. Swiss chard did great.


Beets do alright. Trying okra. Pests of some kind took my brussel sprouts and broccoli last season. Arugula bolted on me pretty fast. Probably should have cut faster.

Last edited by NW Crow; 07-22-2018 at 10:27 AM..
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Old 07-22-2018, 10:46 AM
 
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If you want to start growing fast, build a cold frame out of used windows from Buds or the Habitat for Humanity Restore. It’s a quick and dirty way to get going while you are building your greenhouse. Also check the ph of your water. Many wells, including mine, have alkaline water. I’ve done very well with lettuce and tomatoes using the Kratky system. My soil is so bad it’s not worth using so I went to hydroponics and Kratky is a no brainer. Check out YouTube for ideas.
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Old 07-22-2018, 02:32 PM
 
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thanks all for the replies. ill take all these into consideration. Since we do have crappy soil and I know our sun is pretty intense, perhaps growing lettuce indoors with pots and potting soil might be better? with a grow light?

I might use containers and put them behind my deck. Sun does not get too intense. but enough shade.

Opinions?
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