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Old 09-05-2018, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,503 posts, read 4,545,428 times
Reputation: 15925

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Colorado Springs Considering New Rules For Airbnb-Type Vacation Rentals | KRCC

“We know that this is a huge issue in our community,” said Jill Gaebler, president pro tem of Colorado Springs City Council.

Gaebler is part of a group that helped draft a proposed short term rental ordinance. The ordinance would do several things to regulate the properties. First, it would require owners get a permit before they can list a short term rental, which will help the city track the units and ensure that people are paying sales and lodging taxes.

Additionally, owners will have to meet a handful of criteria in order to qualify for a permit. For instance, they’ll have to prove that they have sufficient liability insurance, and they’ll need to supply a local contact who can deal with problems at the property as they arise. Owners will also be required to complete a safety self-inspection.


I think this is an area that does need some regulation. A house down the street that suddenly starts operating as a hotel changes the nature of the neighborhood. Many neighborhoods have HOAs that preclude such businesses.

Furthermore, I bet quite a few of these business owners "forget" to pay lodging taxes.

What do you think?
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Old 09-05-2018, 10:13 AM
 
20,521 posts, read 38,246,898 times
Reputation: 18421
It's the Uber case all over; people using their own cars to serve as taxicabs to make a buck but in this case it's people using their own homes to rent rooms and make a buck. Same concept, different asset class.

The current effort is because the hotel industry is calling in the IOUs from those whom they've helped to elect ($$$) with campaign donations. That's what the donations are for, to remind politicians that "we care" what happens to us when you're running the government. Lobbyists are on the hotel payroll to visit city hall when issues impact the hotel industry. City Council doesn't really care about the topic except for the loss of lodging taxes. They care mostly because the hotel industry is in their face about the loss of revenue.

I can't really blame the hotel industry as they have hundreds of billions of dollars invested in properties that are required to meet safety, fire, tax, security, liability, zoning, building and other codes to keep their doors open to the public.

Imagine now that you run an insurance company serving home owners with property insurance. You need to know about the added risks/liability which means you need to increase insurance coverage of the AirBnB operators who are currently skirting all the rules and flying below the radar.

If I were city hall I'd take the middle ground on this. I'd let people pimp out their spare bedrooms but the operators would need a license, be certified to a minimum standard, undergo regular inspections to assure compliance, keep a proper set of financial records, pay all taxes such as lodging as well as state and federal income tax, etc.

Myself, I'd never set up my home to do this, I like my privacy and I hate the annoyance of dealing with others. I invest in REITs to make money from hotels, homes, apartments, windmills, shopping malls, cell towers and medical facilities. I'm not sure there's all that much profit in this for those who follow all the rules, the profits are there now because everything is done off the books and homeowner insurance firms have no idea what's going on.
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Old 09-09-2018, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,707 posts, read 2,966,152 times
Reputation: 1747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
It's the Uber case all over; people using their own cars to serve as taxicabs to make a buck but in this case it's people using their own homes to rent rooms and make a buck. Same concept, different asset class.

I can't really blame the hotel industry as they have hundreds of billions of dollars invested in properties that are required to meet safety, fire, tax, security, liability, zoning, building and other codes to keep their doors open to the public.
This exactly. If someone is going to rent out their property, they have to follow the rules that a corporation would need.
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Old 09-09-2018, 06:21 PM
 
106 posts, read 92,135 times
Reputation: 182
Is there a safety or liability difference between renting daily, weekly, monthly, or yearly?

This looks like. It could go the way of the lemonade stand. Sally Dick, and Jane have to apply for a permit, business license, and submit to health department inspections in order to earn money for their summer camp.
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Old 09-19-2018, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,503 posts, read 4,545,428 times
Reputation: 15925
Default Update, 19_Sep_2018

https://www.csindy.com/coloradosprin...t?oid=15399624

"At the August meeting, the Planning Commission was asked to weigh in on a proposed ordinance (City Council has final say) that could change all that. The proposal, nearly two years in the making, limits the number of STRs per lawful dwelling unit and per property; bans STRs in trailers, tents and other mobile or temporary structures; requires that neighbors be given an emergency contact available 24/7; allows the city to shut down or suspend nuisance rentals; requires registration and the payment of applicable taxes; and sets forth a variety of other standards and rules meant to enhance safety and promote neighborhood tranquility.

The proposal is, to be frank, widely unpopular. While many people spoke "in support" of the ordinance, almost all had at least one gripe. As the meeting was wrapping up, one official drew laughter by noting, "I guess it's a good piece of legislation because no one's really happy.""


Regulation is coming. Here is your chance to become involved.

"City Council will have the final say, and is expected to first hear the details of the proposal at a Sept. 24 work session. If they give the nod to move forward without changes, a public hearing and vote would likely be held in October."
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Old 09-19-2018, 10:35 AM
 
1,274 posts, read 1,667,986 times
Reputation: 1568
I doubt there are too many major cities that don't already have registration and permitting for short-term rentals. It surprises me that this is just now being considered here, like it or not.
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Old 09-24-2018, 01:25 PM
 
3 posts, read 886 times
Reputation: 15
This backwards thinking will never cease. Officials think of the economy as funds that are seized, businesses licensed and "regulated" and fines levied. One must pay to get in the game. Those who run for office and those that elect them seem to have no notion of what a free market is and how it works. Limited is not "free". Paying tax on hopes and dreams is the stuff of nightmares. Paying to take a huge personal risk is the ludicrous notion government entertains that it is protecting us from ourselves.
Do any of these elected officials know anything about The Constitution? They all were educated by government run schools so they have to admit failure in that endeavor. We are all forced to go to school and when we graduate we learn we need to go to school and government wants to loan us money to do so. Student Loan Sharking...If you dare to run a business you will believe that government is required to intrude. Government appoints many of its citizens that it represents as "losers", failure to pay for success. That is supposed to be the free market's job. The government has appointed itself a massive HOA and prays that ignorance will continue unabated. The taxpayers never were advised as to what happened to the funds they paid for road maintenance and did not flinch when asked to vote for a tax increase to pay for something they already paid for and did not receive as evidenced by the horrid conditions of the streets. The city has 6000 miles of paved roadways which have a life of ten years. One crack allows water in which will freeze and water molecules at low temps attach to each other in a pattern which swells thus forcing asphalt apart allowing in more (storm)water, more ice and so forth. If ignored the 10 year life is shortened to one or two. So pay tax on house guests and in return...???
To offer a place for rent overnight will allow government agents to enter the property without a warrant. Seizures/asset forfeiture/fines will follow. Or Jailbnb.
A law enforcement officer said that criminals were not too smart to break a law in order to take people's money when there are 1000 ways to do it legally. Get elected is one way.
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Old 09-26-2018, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,503 posts, read 4,545,428 times
Reputation: 15925
Neighborhoods split over short-term rental ordinance

https://gazette.com/cheyenneedition/...9ee61774d.html

"Complaints lobbied against short-term renters included improper cigarette butt disposal, bonfires during a fire ban, big weddings or corporate retreats in residential neighborhoods, feeding wild animals, and strangers living in the house next door, Herington said.

Michael Applegate, a founding member of the Neighborhood Preservation Alliance of Colorado Springs, thinks the ordinance is far too lenient. Applegate’s group wants short-term rentals to be limited to primary residences, for the city to have control of the growth of short-term rentals, and for a “closed-loop reporting system” to be delineated in the ordinance.

Though Applegate’s experiences with the neighboring rental property has been “benign,” Applegate’s main concern is the commercialization of neighborhoods caused by the proliferation of non-owner-occupied short-term rentals. He is concerned about the adverse effects non-owner-occupied short-term rentals have had on cities like New Orleans and Nashville, including a significant increase in short-term rentals, a shift of neighborhood culture, and a rise in housing costs. Those cities are being forced to re-evaluate their stance on short-term rentals because of the negative consequences, Applegate said.

“We have about six (short-term rentals) in Holland Park that are full-time, short-term rentals, and it’s really important to make that distinction because we’re not opposed to home sharing; we’re not opposed to Airbnb in principle or any other of the vacation rental platforms,” Applegate said. “ ... the market has been saturated with the people who are able and comfortable with sharing their own homes, and so in order to continue growing their listings (vacation rental platforms are) encouraging non-owner occupied units to be used as short-term rentals.”"


A non owner occupied short term rental is clearly a business operating in a residential area. Most residential neighborhoods are not zoned for operating businesses.

However, with the implementation of services like Airbnb, the property owners have an opportunity to generate a significant income from their housing investments by competing with the hotel industry's daily rates. I can understand both sides of the issue.

"Many of the properties his company manages are owned by women, minorities, or low- to middle-income families trying to make a living, and not by wealthy investors, Wilburn said.

Trinity, who requested her last name be held for safety reasons since her home information is public, is a short-term rental owner in Old Colorado City and a self-employed mother. In her experience, the neighbors are pleased with her upkeep of the property and she has had very few negative experiences with guests. Her home is one of three other properties on the street used strictly for short-term rentals.

“It gives me the opportunity to stay home with my baby and not send her to daycare,” Trinity said about her rental property. Before owning the rental home, Trinity rented a room in her apartment to pay for her expenses in college, which allowed her to graduate without student loans.

Members of the community are welcome to attend City Council’s public hearing at 1 p.m. Oct. 9 in City Hall to voice their concerns about the issue."

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Old 09-26-2018, 02:08 PM
Status: "Please snow." (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Manitou Springs
959 posts, read 1,063,787 times
Reputation: 838
The Indy had a bit article about this as well: https://www.csindy.com/coloradosprin...t?oid=15399624

Seems like no matter what the level of control by city government, allowing anyone to run an airbnb means all neighborhoods could/should be zoned commercial, which in turn would affect property taxes. Commercial zoning might also open up questions about other businesses folks might want to run out of their homes.

Where does it end?
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Old 09-26-2018, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
4,688 posts, read 9,284,596 times
Reputation: 4639
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngigi View Post
The Indy had a bit article about this as well: https://www.csindy.com/coloradosprin...t?oid=15399624

Seems like no matter what the level of control by city government, allowing anyone to run an airbnb means all neighborhoods could/should be zoned commercial, which in turn would affect property taxes. Commercial zoning might also open up questions about other businesses folks might want to run out of their homes.

Where does it end?
No, allowing short term rentals in residentially zoned properties does not mean that the properties need to be rezoned. It just means that the standards, restrictions, etc., need to be written to specify what can or cannot be done in a residence. Just like the regulations governing running a business from a home; there are strict guidelines to allow this but it doesn't mean that the property has to be rezoned.

I live in a small neighborhood in a small town part of the year, and this has been a big problem. Out-of-state owners buying houses with no intention of ever living there. They use them only as a short term rental. This means that people in the community have a hard time finding long term rentals. It also means that the short term rental people do not honor the CC&Rs of our neighborhood, nor do they care about city codes. We had people building fires in the outdoor fire pit during a severe drought and fire ban. We've had people with all-night parties because they are on vacation. Short term rentals can be very detrimental.
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