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Old 02-03-2019, 04:06 PM
Status: "Please snow." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Manitou Springs
978 posts, read 1,076,636 times
Reputation: 848

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Quote:
Originally Posted by StarrySkiesAbove View Post
We xeriscaped most of our property but we kept a couple of small areas of sod and we aerated and then overseeded the areas with micro clover, itís a dwarf variety of dutch white clover. It has done really well, itís lower water use than sod, stays green much longer and is resistant to pet urine; it completely filled in the burn areas from the dogs. Itís very soft to walk on and if you donít want it to flower you can keep it mowed. It also is amazing at outcompeting undesirable weeds. We had a dry sloped area that weeds had filled in where the grass had been, the clover took it over within a few months.

A few things to consider is itís not as wear resistant as sod so if you have kids playing a 50/50 clover and grass seed blend may work better and it doesnít do well in full shade. We did a sod clover blend in a small area in the backyard since thereís more foot traffic from us and the dogs, but in the front we went full clover. Because it is a very small leaf the clover blends in with existing grass and clover adds nitrogen to the soil to keep the lawn healthy.

Sounds nice. The stuff they showed on "This Old House" was a 50/50 mix ... half clover, half whatever the grass was. If I were going to have a house built here, it's something I would insist on.

It's too bad more developers don't give those options ... I'm not really sure who decides on the landscaping for new construction, but considering our water issues now and that it will only get worse in the future, this seems like something that should be mandatory for all new construction.
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Old 02-03-2019, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
595 posts, read 700,488 times
Reputation: 957
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngigi View Post

It's too bad more developers don't give those options ... I'm not really sure who decides on the landscaping for new construction, but considering our water issues now and that it will only get worse in the future, this seems like something that should be mandatory for all new construction.
And not just new construction, we have a historic home downtown on a large lot, the amount of water that it would take to keep large lawns green is tremendous (unfortunately we donít have an old well like some in the neighborhood). The mini dutch clover is nice in that we can have a lush green look without all the wasted water.
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Old 02-03-2019, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,410 posts, read 1,620,559 times
Reputation: 2324
Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
We definitely do not need help for "lawns"- that should be the least of everyone's concerns and CO. policy concerning water should not even consider lawns.

Not a bad idea on the water storage however.
Sorry to bust your theory about Colo and the West's water shortages: lawns aren't the cause of our water crisis. The HUGE user of surface water in the west (Colo and Arizona included) is agriculture. They use like 70% of the surface water!!

So, like Arizona has done, acres and acres of former orange groves and alfalfa fields are now occupied by new homes. The water rights of these agriculture areas have been used to keep the homes with a guaranteed water supply.

And if you are a "purist" re: avoiding using water for landscape lawns, there are native alternatives to bluegrass along the Front Range, like Buffalo grass and blue grama grass lawns. Few people use them.
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Old 02-04-2019, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,083 posts, read 1,637,706 times
Reputation: 3138
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Sorry to bust your theory about Colo and the West's water shortages: lawns aren't the cause of our water crisis. The HUGE user of surface water in the west (Colo and Arizona included) is agriculture. They use like 70% of the surface water!!

So, like Arizona has done, acres and acres of former orange groves and alfalfa fields are now occupied by new homes. The water rights of these agriculture areas have been used to keep the homes with a guaranteed water supply.

And if you are a "purist" re: avoiding using water for landscape lawns, there are native alternatives to bluegrass along the Front Range, like Buffalo grass and blue grama grass lawns. Few people use them.
Every bit counts and agriculture is essential lawns are not. I hope in the future all new construction will feature xeriscaping.
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Old 02-04-2019, 08:46 AM
Status: "Modern day Salem" (set 10 hours ago)
 
Location: Colorado
791 posts, read 411,735 times
Reputation: 879
Quote:
Originally Posted by BornintheSprings View Post
Every bit counts and agriculture is essential lawns are not. I hope in the future all new construction will feature xeriscaping.
Does that depend on what theyíre growing?
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Old 02-04-2019, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,083 posts, read 1,637,706 times
Reputation: 3138
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
Does that depend on what theyíre growing?
Hmm yes possibly I do know the California almond growers suck up quite a bit of water. I don't know what a good solution could be apart from the state mandating what crops can be grown based on water reserves.
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Old 02-04-2019, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,410 posts, read 1,620,559 times
Reputation: 2324
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngigi View Post
Sounds nice. The stuff they showed on "This Old House" was a 50/50 mix ... half clover, half whatever the grass was. If I were going to have a house built here, it's something I would insist on.

It's too bad more developers don't give those options ... I'm not really sure who decides on the landscaping for new construction, but considering our water issues now and that it will only get worse in the future, this seems like something that should be mandatory for all new construction.
Put Clover in my lawn? No thanks. I used to spray weed killer on the stuff when it would pop-up in my lawn in Illinois. haha
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Old Today, 06:56 PM
 
32 posts, read 1,016 times
Reputation: 20
I once read "There's no shortage of water, just a shortage of pipes."
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