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Old 03-21-2011, 02:30 PM
 
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I think asking your cardiologist or general physician to get the most accurate answer. Everyone reacts differently to altitude, but your doctor is your best source.
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Old 03-29-2011, 09:53 AM
 
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Re mountainrose - don't know if people who have heart valve problems fare better or worse at high altitudes. It would be difficult to compare I would suppose.

One correction: it isn't that high altitudes create larger red blood cells, just more of them. Red blood cells are relatively large to begin with no matter what altitude you live at.
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Old 04-04-2011, 01:06 AM
 
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Great question from long ago. But I think that most people will do well once adjusted. My sis lived in C. Spgs for a few yrs & had no problems. I wondered of pets & how they'll do? I've heard that more blood vessels (I think) develop in higher elevations but not sure. Does anyone know if it is heart healthier since Olympic athletes do train there at higher altitudes. I assume it builds the cardiovascular system quite well vs lower levels.
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Old 04-04-2011, 10:39 AM
SYS
 
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The issue really depends on each individual's:

AGE
HEALTH
CONGENITAL DISPOSITION
LIFESTYLE
ETC.

When I moved here about 8 years ago from Tucson, AZ, I didn't have any physical symptoms or problems associated with the altitude. Then about 5 years ago, I was diagnosed with arrhythmia. While I was taking a medication to control this, I went on a month long vacation trip with my family to a sea level location out of the country. I noticed that I felt great with no arrhythmic symptoms even without taking any pills, so I stopped taking my medications. After a couple of years of not taking my medication, however, I started feeling that something wasn't right -- getting fatigued all the time, harder breathing, etc. When I saw my cardiologist for these worries, I was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation resulting from a "hole in the heart." I'm now on coumadin, metaprolor, and flecnide.... feeling dizzy and tired.

From my experience, I conclude that it all depends on the individual's health disposition, both congenital and lifestyle. Then the age catches up with you. If you're not sure, stay at sea level to be safe. As soon as my boys graduate from high school and go off to college, my wife and I'll be descending, hopefully, to our retirement years in San Diego.
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Old 04-04-2011, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Greeley, Colorado
631 posts, read 1,358,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karenbataglia View Post
I would not move here. I have lived here 24 years and have had nothing but chronic health problems. The lack of oxygen puts a huge strain on the heart and entire body. Don't let any of the outdoors nuts who will never say anything negative about CO convince you otherwise. Stay at sea level.
You must be referring to people who smoke, are out of shape, and/or have asthma problems. I myself have a form of asthma and I've been living at around 5000 feet for nearly 16 years. Guess what. No asthma attacks (though I do suffer from acute wheezing during extremely cold weather) during my whole stay here. I've climbed several mountains with minimal difficulty. In other words, as another poster said, it all depends on the person. Yes the lower oxygen levels can put a strain on one's body but only if they have problems absorbing oxygen in the first place. You claim to have chronic health issues. Have you ever once for half a second consider other factors than just elevation (aka do you smoke, have asthma, are you out of shape, have other pre-existing medical conditions)? All this coming from a dude who was born at sea level.
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Old 04-11-2011, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
1,309 posts, read 2,264,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by movintime View Post
Great question from long ago. But I think that most people will do well once adjusted. My sis lived in C. Spgs for a few yrs & had no problems. I wondered of pets & how they'll do? I've heard that more blood vessels (I think) develop in higher elevations but not sure. Does anyone know if it is heart healthier since Olympic athletes do train there at higher altitudes. I assume it builds the cardiovascular system quite well vs lower levels.
This is correct. Pets do great! There are loads of happy dogs (and probably cats, too). It does generally build the CV system better compared to sea level locales. Your heart has to work harder, which makes it stronger...kind of like everything else However, if one already has heart issues or major health concerns like emphyzema or obesity, the strain might cause more problems than benefits. I've lived here with asthma for 10 years (I'm 24) and have never had an issue controlling it.

Apart from heart issues, the clean crisp air and delicious water promote overall health as well.
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