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Old 01-13-2010, 08:30 AM
Status: "It's almost Christmas (and Christmas break)!" (set 10 days ago)
 
794 posts, read 1,096,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Unless they have a condition that compromises their respiratory system such as asthma, apparently they do very well. At least that is what I have read/heard.

20yrsinBranson
That concerns me. I've had asthma all my life (I live in Miami), and although I am physically fit (I run..a lot), the altitude scares me. I guess I'll have to visit a few times during different seasons to see how it would affect me.
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Old 01-13-2010, 10:37 AM
 
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With all this talk about altitude, now I`m wondering if your body can be affected by 4600 elev. Would anybody know? I get migraines but mine were worse at sea level. Also, when you travel and you go through higher elevations for a short period, would that have an affect on your body too?
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Old 01-13-2010, 09:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cl723 View Post
With all this talk about altitude, now I`m wondering if your body can be affected by 4600 elev. Would anybody know? I get migraines but mine were worse at sea level. Also, when you travel and you go through higher elevations for a short period, would that have an affect on your body too?
I got edema (fluid retention around heart and lungs) at only 8000 ft. I expect a bit of adaptation and conditioning to be needed at 5000 for me. I'd expect a problem if I went straight to Woodland Park from sea level.
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Old 03-22-2011, 04:31 PM
 
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[LIST=1][*]I moved up to mile high Prescott, Arizona 3 weeks ago. I noticed always having dry chapped lips. And shortness of breath. I used to bicycle allover Seattle, WA, I have very strong lungs normally. Its the high altitude. I could not find any decent jobs up here and lacks good public transportation. I am moving back to Seattle. I can get work easy there and buses to everywhere. I can breathe better and dont get chapped lips in Seattle. I went to High School up here in the 1980s. I thought I would like it up here. This town is good if you are retired with money. Seattle is better for younger people.[/LIST]
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Old 03-22-2011, 07:13 PM
 
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From my understanding, asthmatics, (if well-controlled), do better at higher altitudes, especially if the asthma is allergy related, (as is mine), due to the reduced allergens, (outdoor allergens). Individuals with emphysema have more issues than asthmatics at high altitude, but this condition is also progressive.The cold air can be an issue for asthma, but this can occur at any altitude. I live in the Ohio valley and it is one of the worst places to live for both allergies and asthma and I am doing fine. My daughter, also asthmatic, has more problems with her allergies, but her asthma is well-controlled. I am hoping our move with improve her allergy issues, therefore improving her asthma and hopefully she will need less preventative medications. I lived in Utah as an adult and had some issues with my asthma, but again, where we lived was a valley and the air quality in the area where we lived was not good. Colorado's air quality is very good in comparison to most areas in the country.

Good luck to you!
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Old 10-06-2014, 08:24 AM
 
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Diamox is a prescription that helps people contend with altitude. My Dad was pushing 300 lbs at 70 years old and had a 5-bypass surgury. I insisted he get the Rx. On his last visit, he was almost passing out as my Mom drove over the overpasses. His doc in Detroit didnt know what Diamox was. I made him shake the guy and tell him to do his job and he gave him the Rx. When he came out I came back to my place and found him riding his bike for 10 miles in 100 degree temps in Denver. He said he never felt better. Strange for a guy who says he's hot all the time. Diamox helps people acclimatize. Mountain climbers use it. High altitude is different for everyone. The older you are the more time is needed. I have my parents spend 3 days in Denver before going into the foothills and beyond. Flatlanders dont know or understand these techniques. Altitude sickness is similar to The Bends (scuba diving). Its not something to be taken lightly.
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Old 10-09-2014, 11:53 PM
 
1,078 posts, read 407,649 times
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I don't think I ever acclimated to the high altitudes of Colorado. I remember when I was moving in and I just felt winded and exhausted all the time. It was no fun. I was living on the 3rd floor and got exhausted from carrying a box of books up the stairs. I think I may need Diamox if I ever go back.
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Old 10-10-2014, 07:34 AM
 
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Even people born and raised on the Front Range may sometimes feel altitude effects above 9000-10000 feet or so at times. Sometimes it does seem to matter how quickly you ascend to that altitude, how strenuous your physical activity at altitude is, how hydrated you are, the quality of breakfast you ate, etc. Other times, you think you did everything right and you still feel it, or do every thing 'wrong' and you're fine. Usually it is an inconvenience more than anything, but especially if you're new to altitude, pay attention and be a little cautious.
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Old 10-10-2014, 03:34 PM
 
1,078 posts, read 407,649 times
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otowi, one thing I noticed I traveled to Cripple Creek over this summer and once I hit the pass of 9000 feet I actually felt pretty good. It was heading back to Colorado Springs elevation that I felt like crap but it could have been a number of reasons not just altitude issues as you pointed out.
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Old 10-15-2014, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
939 posts, read 807,751 times
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It takes your body far longer than one or two days to fully acclimate to high altitude. Try 4-6 months. Your blood can thicken slightly because your bone marrow will produce more red blood cells. People with coronary artery disease (like me) however do extremely well at high altitude. The lower oxygen pressure at altitude forces your body to adapt, one of the adaptations being a tendency to grow new additional tiny coronary arteries to compensate for the lower oxygen pressure. It's not that there is less oxygen at high altitude, it's that the lower atmospheric pressure makes it harder for your body to absorb the available oxygen than it is at sea level.

I've been here in SW Colorado for 15 months now, live at 7,000' and can easily do strenuous hikes starting at 10,000' & higher. Best physical condition I've been in for years.
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