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Old 10-16-2011, 12:40 AM
 
Location: 900 miles from my home in 80814
4,669 posts, read 6,737,637 times
Reputation: 7078

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
I would live in Woodland Park if I was independently wealthy and could just hole up in my overpriced mansion in the woods, and never want to ride my motorcycle or grow a garden.

But reality says I have to live in Colorado Springs, where there's jobs, and a growing season longer than 2 months. WP is a beautiful city, but I don't think I could live there, I'd go insane.
Actually, WP has more affordable housing than mansion-in-the-woods housing. Much of the housing is in WP proper. The mansions are along the golf course, north of town, or south of town. In town is nice, affordable and the views are great. There's also Divide, which can be very affordable, too.

I grew a garden every year at 9200 ft., by using a cold frame, raised beds and containers. I had tomatoes, zucchini, beans, snow peas, broccoli, cucumbers, radishes, lettuces, carrots, and tons of flowers. I got short season veggie varieties, and extended the growing season from the normal 85-90 days to almost 110 days. Start your seedlings indoors, harden them off after Father's day, and they go into the soil.

And you can easily ride a motorcycle. My neighbor has a Harley and rides it almost every day that there's no snow on the roads, which is most of the time. There are also jobs in Woodland Park. It has almost every business you can think of other than the big nationals.

WP is a small enough town that people know each other, people are helpful and friendly, and the crime is low, the hospitality is high and the views of Pikes Peak are unparalled...I still have my attorney (since my husband is no longer practicing there), accountant, doctor and dentist there. I'm firmly rooted in Teller County and go back often.
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Old 10-19-2011, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Woodland Park, CO
69 posts, read 193,453 times
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Well as others pointed out, WP is a very affordable place to live if you want to be in the mountains. There are some great areas with affordable homes. It's colder, sure, but that's great in the summer as you never need AC (we're usually around 10 degrees cooler than COS).

If you're really, really serious about gardening, move to Oregon or California, I don't think anywhere in CO is great for that.
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Old 10-19-2011, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,139 posts, read 5,483,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt314159 View Post
Well as others pointed out, WP is a very affordable place to live if you want to be in the mountains. There are some great areas with affordable homes. It's colder, sure, but that's great in the summer as you never need AC (we're usually around 10 degrees cooler than COS).

If you're really, really serious about gardening, move to Oregon or California, I don't think anywhere in CO is great for that.
Actually, Venetucci Farm seems to do well. If you have cheap water (Fountain, Pueblo) you could do very well in the south or Arkansas River Valley.

Woodland Park, not so much.
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Old 10-20-2011, 12:13 AM
 
Location: 900 miles from my home in 80814
4,669 posts, read 6,737,637 times
Reputation: 7078
Quote:
Originally Posted by lalahartma View Post
Woodland Park, not so much.
You'd be surprised. There are a lot of gardeners in WP and Divide. Lots of people grow veggies. Divide used to be the heart of lettuce and potato farming at the turn of the century. Many years ago, Denver's Channel 4 had a Master Gardner (Matt Mateyka) who used to have a contest to find the best vegetable and flower gardens in CO, and one year a family living off Broken Wheel Dr., in Divide, won the grand prize for their 1/4 acre veggie garden, so it's definitely possible.

Last edited by Marcy1210; 10-20-2011 at 12:17 AM.. Reason: Spelling
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Old 10-20-2011, 03:45 AM
 
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How do people with heart problems do at that altitude, from what you hear?
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Old 10-20-2011, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,139 posts, read 5,483,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcy1210 View Post
You'd be surprised. There are a lot of gardeners in WP and Divide. Lots of people grow veggies. Divide used to be the heart of lettuce and potato farming at the turn of the century. Many years ago, Denver's Channel 4 had a Master Gardner (Matt Mateyka) who used to have a contest to find the best vegetable and flower gardens in CO, and one year a family living off Broken Wheel Dr., in Divide, won the grand prize for their 1/4 acre veggie garden, so it's definitely possible.

It's not easy. But cold weather crop would do 'ok.' I would assume you'd have to do a bunch of soil amending. You grow what does well, like any place.
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Old 10-21-2011, 12:27 AM
 
Location: 900 miles from my home in 80814
4,669 posts, read 6,737,637 times
Reputation: 7078
We had a really nice SW exposure, with a concrete foundation wall that was exposed on both walls. We used landscape timbers and built raised beds filled with about 5' deep soil (just regular dirt that was delivered). The sun would warm the landscape timbers and the concrete walls raising the soil temperature by about 20 - 25 degrees, and keeping the soil warm at night with the concrete's absorbed heat. The NE shady corner of the house could be 20F in winter, yet on the SW side, the temp was about 40F - 45F. The soil never froze, and actually stayed very warm year round. With the sun heating the soil, we could grow all winter by framing the beds with visquine to make a green house, and mulching the plants. It was really easy, and in the summer we could grow all the veggies they grew in the Arkansas River Valley except melons and corn, as they were too big for the beds; but we grew tomatoes, peppers, cukes, beans, zuchinni, squash, and cool crops like broccoli, carrots, peas, asparagus, herbs, and flowers. By creating microclimates, we could manipulate the growing season, and manipulate the type of crops we grew. It was a lot of fun to have fresh veggies that we actually grew!
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Old 10-21-2011, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,139 posts, read 5,483,318 times
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You rock, that's wonderful! You are a real gardener.
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Old 10-21-2011, 09:31 AM
 
Location: 80904 West siiiiiide!
2,864 posts, read 7,095,361 times
Reputation: 1543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcy1210 View Post
We had a really nice SW exposure, with a concrete foundation wall that was exposed on both walls. We used landscape timbers and built raised beds filled with about 5' deep soil (just regular dirt that was delivered). The sun would warm the landscape timbers and the concrete walls raising the soil temperature by about 20 - 25 degrees, and keeping the soil warm at night with the concrete's absorbed heat. The NE shady corner of the house could be 20F in winter, yet on the SW side, the temp was about 40F - 45F. The soil never froze, and actually stayed very warm year round. With the sun heating the soil, we could grow all winter by framing the beds with visquine to make a green house, and mulching the plants. It was really easy, and in the summer we could grow all the veggies they grew in the Arkansas River Valley except melons and corn, as they were too big for the beds; but we grew tomatoes, peppers, cukes, beans, zuchinni, squash, and cool crops like broccoli, carrots, peas, asparagus, herbs, and flowers. By creating microclimates, we could manipulate the growing season, and manipulate the type of crops we grew. It was a lot of fun to have fresh veggies that we actually grew!
I wish I had that kind of enthusiasm. lol
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Old 10-22-2011, 12:06 AM
 
Location: 900 miles from my home in 80814
4,669 posts, read 6,737,637 times
Reputation: 7078
Once you build the beds, it's just yearly maintenance. We got the idea from the people I mentioned a few posts up from Divide who did it. And, we had good friends in WP who were obsessed with fresh veggies, so we learned a lot from them, as well. The link below shows how another family did their high altitude gardening. I learned a lot from them, too.

High Altitude Gardening - Vegetable Gardening
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