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Old 04-25-2007, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Colorado
43 posts, read 133,809 times
Reputation: 27
Default If you are thinking of moving to Colorado Springs, read this!

There have been some very informative threads started here regarding Colorado Springs. But one thing I have noticed over and over is that people seem to downplay the weather here. I would like to tell it like it really is. Just to qualify myself, I have lived in Colorado Springs for the past 5 years, so I know what I am talking about.

The first snow usually happens in mid-October. Then we will get cold snaps and snowstorms on and off for the next 7 months, until May. The last freeze is usually around May 15th, but it has been known to be quite chilly on Memorial Day. Yes, the snow usually melts quickly. However, some years are the exceptions. This past year, it has been much worse. Temperatures in winter time vary between 40s and 50s all the way down to -15 degrees. (This extreme cold has happened every winter that I have lived here so far.) Add to that the winds. We regularly get 20-30 mile an hour sustained winds with gusts up to 40 mph. Spring is very unpredictable, with sunny days one day and thunderstorms the next, and 1 foot of snow the next, as we had yesterday. (4-25-07) These weather patterns vary wildly depending on what part of town you live in. We live in the Falcon area, which is much windier than other parts of town. If you look at weather statistics for the area, it can be misleading, because the weather readings are taken at the airport, which is on the south side of town, and in one of the lower elevation areas.

All this to say, if you are planning on moving here, visit more than once, if you can. It is a great place to live, raise a family, etc. as other posters have stated. But make sure the weather won't bother you before you move!!
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Old 04-25-2007, 02:03 PM
 
11 posts, read 48,871 times
Reputation: 23
Ok, here's a question... I've lived in Michigan and Minnesota most of my life, so there is no such thing as bad weather (other than where I live now - Portland - which freakin' rains too much).

If I had a great job in Pueblo, and CS is 45 miles north, would the commute be horrible (traffic, not distance) and are there towns/developments south of CS that are nice?

I don't think my wife is going to like the desert of Pueblo, but I already know she'd like CS from visiting there.

Help!

Last edited by TKO1068; 04-25-2007 at 03:00 PM..
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Old 04-25-2007, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Colorado
43 posts, read 133,809 times
Reputation: 27
The commute is not bad, as far as traffic goes. An up and coming area on the south side of CS is Fountain, which has it's good and bad parts. The elevations is a little lower so weather there is more moderate. And it is more affordable. That's where Ft. Carson is, so lots of military there. You are probably looking at about a 30 min. commute from Pueblo to Fountain.
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Old 04-25-2007, 04:17 PM
 
Location: SC
1,929 posts, read 4,163,376 times
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Fountain resident here! Yes, Pueblo is about 35 minutes south of here- traffic is not an issue unless the rare accident happens (which can happen but is much better than going north going through Springs).
We have a very low-income area which would be in downtown Fountain. The rest of Fountain is fairly new- homes less than 10 years old. However, the lowest income school, Aragon Elementary, is doing great and did great on the state report card recieving an Excellent rating (equal do D12 and D20).
The brand new homes in the area are much cheaper than up in northern Springs, which is why our population is growing with leaps and bounds!! The newest home division, Cumberland Green with Oakwood Homes, offers homes up to 3500 sq ft for $264,000 and on down in price. The district (Fountain Fort Carson School District 8) has ample amount of money and is building a new elementary school (Eagleside) in the neighborhood. The district is the highest paying district in the area, to include their guest/substitute teachers ($90.00-$110.00 a day). D8 serves both Fountain and Fort Carson. We have 7 elementary schools, 2 junior highs, and 1 high school. In our Fountain area, we have a Lowes, Safeway, Walmart, several fast-food resturants, an Applebees, and several other businesses. Since we are our own little town, we also have community activites such as street dances/celebrations at city hall, a farmers market, our own fire department/ambulance and police which makes response time only 3 minutes. One neighborhood, Heritage, is so busy at Halloween that you can barely get a car down the street. Every year the streets are swamped with families trick-or-treating. Home owners just sit outside in their lawn chairs going through bags and bags of candy (home decorating for the holiday(s) is also a big thing. I really like Fountain. It has a small town atmosphere, allowing you to run into neighbors and friends anywhere you go. Oh, and lately, statistics have shown that our crime rate is lower down here than up north- how? I don't know, but it just goes to show Fountain is doing okay- a BIG change from 1980s and earlier.
We have few snow days here (for schools). We don't get as much snow down here, we are usually about 5 degrees warmer than the northern part of town.
Anyhow, I like Fountain, it is a friendly community with a small town atmosphere.
Lynette
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Old 04-27-2007, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Ice Station Peyton, Colorado
132 posts, read 439,048 times
Reputation: 82
Smile Yes, the weather can be rather rough in the Winter...

We live on top of a hill at 7,300' in Peyton. No trees, no nothng to block the wind. I have actually seen fist-size rocks blowing across our property. That last snow the other day left 5 FEET of snow on about 50 feet of our driveway. If it wasn't for the wind, I wouldn't have much to complain about really. Sometimes I look outside our windows and watch the wind blow past the trailers out back and it looks like they are driving down the freeway at 60 MPH. The first couple of years were scary. But now it's not so bad. We are about 8-10 degrees (F) cooler here than in Colorado Springs, and with the wind, we never have to use our A/C. We just open the windows in the summer and that does the trick.
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Old 04-27-2007, 09:27 PM
 
Location: SC
1,929 posts, read 4,163,376 times
Reputation: 779
I see you have your power back if you are posting!! Great!
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Old 04-28-2007, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Ice Station Peyton, Colorado
132 posts, read 439,048 times
Reputation: 82
Default Never lost power

Quote:
Originally Posted by froggin4colorado View Post
I see you have your power back if you are posting!! Great!
For some reason, we just don't get blackouts at our place. Sometimes we'll get a 1 second cut in power, just enough to cause all the clocks to go back to the blinking 12:00, but that's it. And that happens maybe only twice a year. We figure that is caused by the MVE folks doing maintenance. We did once have a 3 hour blackout when a car knocked down a power pole down the street. The guys living east of us have more powerouts. We're lucky I guess. I think since our poles run North-South, the wind and ice have a harder time knocking them down.

Sure is nice weather now..
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Old 04-28-2007, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Reynoldsburg, OH
137 posts, read 264,629 times
Reputation: 44
Hi all. It's nice to hear reality about the weather. I've posted before. I now live in Tucson, AZ (which by the way I like.) We may be relocating there for a job for my hubby. I'm a former Ohioan so still remember the winters there. I do miss green! I also love the desert. How well are the roads maintained during bad weather? Do the snow storms just pop up suddenly and you're stranded or do you kind of have a heads up. I know all weather can be unpredictable. I will have to relearn how to drive in snow. Been a long time! Usually the worst weather here is our yearly monsoon season. Lot's of rain and lightning. Roads flood etc. My husband would be working at FT Carson. Is Fountain close to there? What areas close to Ft Carson are nice. I don't expect utopia but have two kids 12 and 17. Thanks!!
Oh and we would be renting first.
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Old 04-28-2007, 11:06 AM
 
16,895 posts, read 22,558,944 times
Reputation: 12116
Well, we've kicked around the climate and weather issue here so many times that I wish we could call a truce on any more weather posts. One only needs to use the Search this Forum tool to get all they want of this topic.

We have weather...every place does...one reason we came here is that we feel this weather is great. Low humidity in summer, regular breezes (instead of that stultifyingly dead air of the DC area), no hurricanes, no earthquakes, and very FEW bugs. There are no tornadoes here to speak of, until you get way east of the Front Range, out on the plains, close to the Kansas border. Out there on the plains the weather fronts can really get moving and roiling after they come off the Front Range.

They just had 10+ tornado fatalilties in TX the other day. We had one here a month ago, the first one in CO in 50 years, which tells me we are not tornado prone to a point we need to worry about it along and west of the Front Range. We do get funnels on the eastern plains, but look at all the death and destruction you get in states to the east.

The recent storm took out 40 power poles in a row, out on the plains, and belong to Mountain View Elec Assoc, a CO-OP. Not sure how good they are, but we had few disruptions here around town. We have pals in the Gleneagles area, right off of I-25, and they lost power, yes, they're served by MVEA...makes we wonder how "robust" the MVEA infrastructure is...our friends are just 4 miles north of us and lost power. We have Col Spgs Utilities and they were flawless, only one blink, late at night, after the worst was over. Have NOT had a power outage here since arrival in 2005. Had them back in Fairfax, VA all too often.

States east of Colorado have awful humidity & tornadoes. Desert southwest has blistering heat. California has Santa Ana winds, brush fires, mudslides and prone to earthquakes. Pacific Northwest is wet and gray for months on end, parts of Washington state are like a wind funnel. Upper midwest (WI, MI, MN) is biting cold and gray for months on end. People in OH and PA complain that winter is long, overcast and gray. Gulf states are way swampy, humid, buggy and prone to hurricanes. So it goes. Weather is everywhere. We like it best here. Gimme this weather anytime. Shoveling powder is no big deal... millions here do it...millions aren't leaving.

We didn't like it back east, so we voted with our feet. Our birthright as Americans is to go where it pleases us.

s/Mike
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Old 04-28-2007, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,313 posts, read 4,679,276 times
Reputation: 649
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingmy4 View Post
There have been some very informative threads started here regarding Colorado Springs. But one thing I have noticed over and over is that people seem to downplay the weather here. I would like to tell it like it really is. Just to qualify myself, I have lived in Colorado Springs for the past 5 years, so I know what I am talking about.
No offense but living here for five years doesn't qualify you for much (seriously no offense) because we have been in a drought for the last five years.

This winter was more "normal" than it has been in a long, long time. Meaning it was normal for the 30 year average.

But that's just coming from a native of Colorado - 39 years this summer.

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