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Old 07-21-2007, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Colorado
156 posts, read 875,054 times
Reputation: 37

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This is a interesting thread, reading about how main streets used to be dirt roads. I remember Highlands ranch was nothing but rolling hills with cattle ranches. Going up and down County Line Road when it had bigger hills and was only two lanes along side the landfill. Back before Parker had its first Safeway and there was just a stop sign there at Main street. Hills country Market was the only grocery store at hilltop. Elizabeth only had Gesins and we rented movies at Norm's gas station. My grandfather telling me when he bought his house in Littleton for 16,000 back in 1959 and University was just recently paved almost up to Orchard rd and everybody thought he was crazy to move so far out in the boonies.
We should start a "remember when" thread.
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Old 07-31-2007, 10:02 AM
 
2,437 posts, read 7,108,652 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nadine View Post
Heck I remember when there was no Air Force Academy! In fact I remember when it was Army Air Force. Want to guess my age? Careful now!!!
It was the 'Army Air Corps', not 'Force'.

I guess I might feel the same if I had lived in one pace for fifty years, but I don't see what the big deal is. The old roads are still there for a trip down memory lane. Otherwise, it's a lot easier to get around now. Sure, WalMarts and Home Depot's are obnoxious, but there's a reason we all shop there. Come on, admit it.
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Old 07-31-2007, 12:16 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,099,702 times
Reputation: 9065
I will be the first to admit that there are things about the "good ol' days" that we find it easy to conveniently forget. If you want an lesson in that just look at tools used in a dentist's office just a few decades ago--OUCH! In Colorado, some not so pleasant memories: when drinking water wasn't safe to drink in a lot of mountains towns, escpecially in spring; when having a serious medical emergency in much of Colorado's geographical area (outside of the Front Range) could easily mean death from lack of qualified medical attention or adequate medical facilities; when making a hundred-plus mile trip was considered a major undertaking in some parts of the state; when vehicles weren't very reliable and needed service every couple of thousand miles, etc., etc.

But then there are some things I REALLY miss about the Colorado of 40-50 years ago:

1. No trophy houses and BS resorts, just mostly quaint family resorts close to nature (heck, some still had outhouses).

2. Outside of the metro areas, very little traffic on the roads.

3. Being able to go for days and not see anyone in the backcountry--even in areas accessible by Jeep.

4. Being able to leave your keys in the ignition all the time in your vehicle in most small towns in the state, and not having to worry about your vehicle or anything in it being stolen. Same with your house.

5. When farms, ranches, and wetlands still had water that hadn't been diverted to the cities.

6. When people in Colorado's cities cared and worried about the ranching, farming, logging, and mining economies of the state because most of the city-dwellers worked in industries partly reliant on what went on out in the "hinterlands."

7. When the "Cowboy Caucus" controlled the State Legislature, and everybody was pretty much cool with it.

8. When the most-listened to program on Denver's KOA radio wasn't drivel talk-radio, but Evan Slack's farm report early in the morning and at noon (and people all the way from North Dakota to New Mexico listened to KOA for that report every day).

9. When a kid smoking a cigarette on school grounds was about the worst thing that happened there--instead of kids bringing bombs and guns to school, shooting up the place and killing students and teachers.

10. When having a ****pot of money and every conceivable adult toy and gadget wasn't the most important thing to most Coloradans.

11. When enjoying the Colorado mountains didn't mean seeing how much could be built in them, driven over them, packed in them, or subdivided in them.

Yup, despite its shortcomings, the Colorado of a half-century ago--more or less--was one really neat place. Too bad it all changed.
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Old 08-10-2007, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
553 posts, read 1,415,087 times
Reputation: 504
Back to the original question. Highway 85 was the precurser to I-25. It was on Nevada, but kept going after the point Nevada gets absorbed by the Interstate today. There's a short bridge over a wash on Vincent Drive, between Dublin and Woodman. They put this bridge on the National Register of Historic Places a few years back (due to its unique cantilevered construction). Anyway, the road continued over this bridge and then pretty close to the track of the Interstate, then diverged West through Monument and Palmer Lake, Greenland, and to Castle Rock. It then went well West of the current Interstate, through Sedalia and then Northward to Denver.

All long before my time, but I'll bet it was a three hour drive.

For what it's worth, I have a friend that in the early-to-mid 60s built a beautiful house very near the intersection of Woodman and Academy. His friends laughed at him for building so far outside of town.
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Old 08-10-2007, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,765,097 times
Reputation: 17411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maynerd View Post
Back to the original question. Highway 85 was the precurser to I-25. It was on Nevada, but kept going after the point Nevada gets absorbed by the Interstate today. There's a short bridge over a wash on Vincent Drive, between Dublin and Woodman. They put this bridge on the National Register of Historic Places a few years back (due to its unique cantilevered construction). Anyway, the road continued over this bridge and then pretty close to the track of the Interstate, then diverged West through Monument and Palmer Lake, Greenland, and to Castle Rock. It then went well West of the current Interstate, through Sedalia and then Northward to Denver.

All long before my time, but I'll bet it was a three hour drive.

For what it's worth, I have a friend that in the early-to-mid 60s built a beautiful house very near the intersection of Woodman and Academy. His friends laughed at him for building so far outside of town.
Excellent information. Thank you. Where did you get these kinds of details especially since it was before your time? Did you check out the maps I posted?
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Old 08-17-2007, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
553 posts, read 1,415,087 times
Reputation: 504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
Excellent information. Thank you. Where did you get these kinds of details especially since it was before your time? Did you check out the maps I posted?
Every once in a while, the Gazette publishes a piece about how things used to be. I'm always interested in the history of a place I live, so I follow those articles pretty closely. And, like you, I'm fascinated by old maps.

You can see a couple strips of abandoned pavement between the Interstate and the Academy airfield. I suspect this is part of the old road.
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Old 02-12-2008, 10:39 AM
 
16,171 posts, read 20,180,588 times
Reputation: 46693
Hi Charles! Glad to contribute. I wish I ccould help more on the I-25 direct route. Jazzlover has it right on post #9. A good portion of the highway was torn up because of the '65 flood. I remember the gravel road that was put in to keep traffic going, and seeing big chunks, and I mean BIG CHUNKS, laying on the side of the gravel road. Speaking of gravel road, before I got my drivers license, Dad would take me out of town for a few driving lessons. On hwy. 105 at about 5 miles south of Sedalia the road was a gravel road. Same with Colo. 83; when you got to Franktown the road south to the Springs was gravel as well. How it intersected into the Springs I can't remember as we moved back to the Denver area in '65.Also hit the county roads east of the Springs on 94. I vaguely remember little bitty towns called Truckton and Hall Station a little east of Rush and Yoder. When I lived in the Springs we lived in the Cragmor area and hike up Rattlesnake Hill, just a little north of Katherine Lee Bates elem. school. I remember Colorado Springs population was 45,472 (1950 census). It might have been 55 or 60 thousand when we left in the early 60's. The Springs was a great place to grow up as a kid.
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Old 08-05-2015, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,668 posts, read 1,668,301 times
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Going through a box of items from my Grandmother's estate, I happened across a 1954 map of Colorado Springs. Unfolding it and looking over it was an amazing trip back in time. It had outlines for a proposed Interstate highway, the Air Force Academy proposed area, a wildlife refuge area in the area now occupied by the Wasson academic campus, a Fillmore street that dead ended at Wood Avenue and a host of other interesting features long ago changed.

The City has recently updated its web site and one of the features they added is an extensive map section. One map in particular I found very interesting was the "Then and Now". This is a map that uses a google earth satellite picture of the area that is overlaid on a 1947 aerial survey of the same area. By moving the spyglass around, you get a black and white photo of what existed within that circle of city 68 years ago. Its pretty stark how much some things have changed.

Link for those who want to check it out:

http://coloradosprings.maps.arcgis.c...161d34ccbfce1b#
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Old 08-07-2015, 11:55 AM
Status: "Goodbye fall ... hello winter" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Manitou Springs
924 posts, read 1,031,388 times
Reputation: 810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
Anybody out there have any historical knowledge on which route a person would have taken from downtown Colorado Springs to central Denver before the I-25 was built? I see Highway 83 through Franktown but it looks like Highway 87 or Highway 85 through Monument would have been more direct? Heading west in Monument on second street there is a north-south road called Beacon Lite Road & "Old Denver Highway". Old Denver highway looks like it dead ends heading south a little south of Baptist Road. Did the COS to DEN route go through Palmer Lake? What was the alignment between COS and Monument? From Palmer Lake north was Spruce Mountain the route? I would have thought there would be one main highway between these two cities but from current maps it is tough to figure out the route.

Also, I met a long time COS resident who told me he used to drive Templeton Gap road from (I guess) near Circle and Union to Black Forest to go hunting. Whatever happened to that route? It almost looks like Templeton Gap became Vollmer northeast of Woodmen and Black Forest roads. Looks like Templeton Gap got segmented at various places as subdivisions went up.
You could try AAA's website to map a trip-tik route such as what you're looking for ... might work.
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Old 08-07-2015, 01:27 PM
 
5,006 posts, read 6,683,532 times
Reputation: 4517
It was Nevada/85/87. Some of it is now eaten up by various other roads.
US 85 enters Colorado from New Mexico concurrent with I-25 but is not signed. US 85 leaves I-25 at Exit 128 and follows Santa Fe Avenue through Fountain before turning west briefly onto Lake Avenue, then turning north following Nevada Avenue through Colorado Springs before rejoining I-25 at Exit 148. Approaching the south side of Denver, US 85 again leaves I-25 at Exit 182. From there it heads west and north as a two lane rural highway. It becomes an expressway near Chatfield Lake and the southern Denver suburbs of Littleton and Englewood. It continues north through Denver for a few miles before once again joining with I-25 at mile marker 207. There it becomes a concurrency with US 87 as well as I-25 and heads north through downtown Denver. At exit 214, US 85 turns east and becomes a concurrency with I-70 and US 6 for about a mile where it exits with U.S. 6 and heads northeast through Commerce City. In just a few miles the US 6/US 85 concurrency merges with I-76 at mile marker 9. They travel concurrently for 3 miles (4.8 km) until exit 12 when US 85 becomes an expressway and continues north out of the Denver area through Brighton. From there it parallels I-25 for about 75 miles (121 km) passing through Fort Lupton, Platteville, Evans, Greeley, and Eaton before crossing into Wyoming.
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