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Old 07-01-2010, 12:37 AM
 
27,447 posts, read 44,947,050 times
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we live in DFW area of TX--have traveled to Colorado several times--been to Denver and Durango -- we were even towed twice in Pueblo on the same day from the same freeway access ramp...but can't claim to know your state very well at all...
I am just looking at possible locations with fairly low humidity and decent temps in summer...

my husband is close to retirement and mentioned that he would like to think about a second home--for the summer mainly--that would have fairly low humidity/temps
He loves to golf and Dallas is so hot and humid in the summer that even this early in the summer getting through a round of golf can be an act of will vs enjoyment...

what areas/towns would you recommend for a couple with no real connections in Colorado to stay for protracted visits???
we enjoy museums, movies, concerts, golf but not really into hiking or the winter sports...

good medical care would be something important to us so I don't know that we would want a town too small

having a second home that might stay vacant for months does not really appeal to me--I can envision problems/expenses that would not really compensate for the time spent there in summer
so I am thinking a motor home would almost be more practical--except that it has to be driven--and as we age that is likely to be problamatic

If we found a property in resort community with ski runs how likely is it that renting it during season is a viable option?
there are tons of them available on VRBO site for one...

I know this sounds like we re pretty vague and we are
frankly I think it would be smarter to just rent--but my husband thinks buying now when prices are down might be good opportunity and then we could pass along to our adult children...
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Old 07-01-2010, 08:05 AM
 
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Depends what budget you have and what type of property you would be willing to go with.

In my experience, unless you have an excess sum of investments and cash in the seven figure range wouldn't bother with buying.

Renting is the way to go as you "buy" what you need when you need it and especially with ski towns that have plenty of golfing available, in the summer months there are tons of places up for monthly rentals. As one wealthy guy told me he rents because it gives him flexibility to go where ever, when ever. If you own a place, to make it worthwhile you are then "obligated" to going there every year.

If you buy and rent out in winter, it sounds like a plan, but the reality is different. Property management companies that generate traffic and rentals to you can hog up 50% of the rent, there is upkeep, taxes, repair, updating and so on. For most people the cost is break even at best. The only ones that make it worthwhile are those that are aggressive about it and do much of the work themselves.

The Colorado Rockies economy is built on dreamers like you husband, people that want to buy a property to live the dream. And there are plenty of smiling people out there ready to relieve you of your money. So I'd really do your research with actual numbers and add it all up and wonder if it's worth the hassle buying something you are beholden to year round.

Vail and Beaver Creek in my opinion are the best summer towns and they have a very active golfing community.
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Old 07-01-2010, 08:40 AM
 
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Don't forget about altitude issues after living at sea level. I know of lots of folks that have had to leave. RP
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Old 07-01-2010, 09:09 AM
 
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In addition to Vail and Beaver Creek, take a look at Steamboat Springs and Silverthorne. They're both really nice areas to live in during the summer. I know that Steamboat has one golf course and possibly 2, but I'm not sure about Silverthorne. Can someone verify?

Silverthorne is a lot closer to Denver than Steamboat Springs, which would also put you a little closer to a hospital, too.
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Old 07-01-2010, 09:16 AM
 
27,447 posts, read 44,947,050 times
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yes--we have not spent lot of time at higher altitudes now that we are older--

and that info about buying vs renting is about what I was thinking...

I know that if we stay for longer periods though we are going to want to bring our dog--
that means finding someplace that takes dogs

I think my husband has the visual of family gatherings if we get second home but fact is that our daughter who lives south of sarasota in fl has husband who travels sunday through friday--
he wants to go home on the weekends--she teachers and has more flexibility in summer but they have two cats and leaving them for more than a weekend is a problem as well...

I never thought I would want a travel trailer but I actually think for the money that might be the best option--except for pulling it...
my husband is great driver--one of the best--but he will get old and frankly I think any person over say 70 COULD be at risk behind the wheel
and frankly anyone younger can be too--but for different reasons--

I guess I will try to talk him into taking a trip to Colorado or maybe northern AZ--Flagstaff area--or Ruidoso (we have been there before and it can be hot--as hot as Dallas so don't know if it will be a good choice long term or not)...
thanks

anyone care to comment on humidity in the summer months in different towns/areas--
would you say there is a significant difference in any of the mountain areas and/or how high UP do you need to go in altitude to feel the difference
and does the farther north you go make the same type of difference?
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Old 07-01-2010, 10:50 AM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,017,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goyanks57 View Post
In addition to Vail and Beaver Creek, take a look at Steamboat Springs and Silverthorne. They're both really nice areas to live in during the summer. I know that Steamboat has one golf course and possibly 2, but I'm not sure about Silverthorne. Can someone verify?

Silverthorne is a lot closer to Denver than Steamboat Springs, which would also put you a little closer to a hospital, too.
I think there is a few in Summit County, private or public I don't know. I thought there was at least one in Breck I remember, another in Keystone and maybe one in Silverthorne on the north side of town.

There are a number of them from Aspen to Glenwood Springs and all points in between. Carbondale or Basalt isn't bad to live in during the summer time.
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Old 07-01-2010, 11:00 AM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,017,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
yes--we have not spent lot of time at higher altitudes now that we are older--

and that info about buying vs renting is about what I was thinking...

I know that if we stay for longer periods though we are going to want to bring our dog--
that means finding someplace that takes dogs

I think my husband has the visual of family gatherings if we get second home but fact is that our daughter who lives south of sarasota in fl has husband who travels sunday through friday--
he wants to go home on the weekends--she teachers and has more flexibility in summer but they have two cats and leaving them for more than a weekend is a problem as well...

I never thought I would want a travel trailer but I actually think for the money that might be the best option--except for pulling it...
my husband is great driver--one of the best--but he will get old and frankly I think any person over say 70 COULD be at risk behind the wheel
and frankly anyone younger can be too--but for different reasons--

I guess I will try to talk him into taking a trip to Colorado or maybe northern AZ--Flagstaff area--or Ruidoso (we have been there before and it can be hot--as hot as Dallas so don't know if it will be a good choice long term or not)...
thanks

anyone care to comment on humidity in the summer months in different towns/areas--
would you say there is a significant difference in any of the mountain areas and/or how high UP do you need to go in altitude to feel the difference
and does the farther north you go make the same type of difference?
I would aim for anywhere from 6500-8500 ft. That puts you in a good climate zone in summer. Cool nights and warm days with breezy afternoons. It's also not too extreme on the altitude.

I get the desire for family gatherings but realistically most people can only put aside a week or two a year to do that outside of their normal vacations. With my family I think we came up with a good solution and will start renting for a week or two in Vail every year. We can get a 6 bedroom mansion for $3k-$3.5K a week and with 7-8 people there it is quite reasonable.

However in ski areas you can get decent furnished condos for $1500 a month or less.

The travel trailer, well where are you going to park it? Many of the resorts that have plenty of golfing around, don't have lots of room or any place at all to park up an RV for a few months.

From my experience living in these towns, travel light and keep the hassles down and enjoyment factor up.
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Old 07-02-2010, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,899,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
I am just looking at possible locations with fairly low humidity and decent temps in summer...
All of colorado has low humidity.
Avoid Western Colorado - the Grand Junction area - which gets very hot (100+) in the summer. The best temps in the summer are in the mountains. Since most of Colorado is mountains, there are plenty of towns for you to choose from.

Quote:
what areas/towns would you recommend for a couple with no real connections in Colorado to stay for protracted visits???
Given your criteria of museums, movies and concerts, you're limited to the Front Range - Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs and nearby towns. Weather wise these towns are okay in the summer, they don't get as hot as Grand Junction, but they still get pretty hot.

Quote:
If we found a property in resort community with ski runs how likely is it that renting it during season is a viable option?
If you need someplace that offers city activities, as you mentioned, then the ski resorts are not going to do it. Activities in the resorts is mostly bars, restaurants, a smattering of arts and crafts, and maybe the occasional outdoor event.
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,899,377 times
Reputation: 2435
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
anyone care to comment on humidity in the summer months in different towns/areas--
would you say there is a significant difference in any of the mountain areas and/or how high UP do you need to go in altitude to feel the difference
and does the farther north you go make the same type of difference?
There's no humidity anywhere in Colorado, mountains or otherwise.
A lot of people notice altitude when they get above 8,000 feet, but this varies signficiatnly from person to person. Some people have a problem at 5,000 feet while others, like myself, don't notice any difference even at 12,000.
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Old 07-02-2010, 03:16 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
There's no humidity anywhere in Colorado, mountains or otherwise.
Not really correct. A lot of areas on Colorado's Eastern Plains can experience humidity in the summertime--certainly not as humid as the East or South, but humid by Western standards. Even places like Pueblo or Greeley on the Front Range can have some muggy, hot days in summer.

People need to check historical climate records before carelessly tossing words around like "never" and "nowhere" when talking about Colorado climate. Such statements are inaccurate and misleading.
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