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Old 07-12-2010, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Woodland Park, CO
3,133 posts, read 9,123,620 times
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What did you study in college? The casinos are hiring dealers in Cripple Creek (25 miles away), average $15-20/hr and they will train you. Dealers make over $30 in Black Hawk but I hear it's hard to get in there.

Woodland Park is perfect, IMO. 8,500' elevation, so it's truly mountain living but affordable.

Breckenridge is less than a 2 hour drive with NO I70 traffic(!!). Town has a population of 7,500, so not too big but big enough to support a fantastic Walmart, Safeway, City Market, Walgreens, Taco Bell, Wendy's, BK, McD's, Sonic, Subway, and a small hospital. If you need to hit up a mall or anything else, Colorado Springs/I25 is a 25 minute drive down the mountain. Denver is about 1.5hrs when you want to hit up a Rockies or Bronco's game

I love it here!

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Old 07-16-2010, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,922,291 times
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The Front Range is known for consistent and reliable afternoon thunderstorms (in the summer months) while this does not occur on the Western Slope. The Front Range is quite snowy in the winter while the Western Slope not so much.

The Front Range is not quite "desert" it's more of Great Plains + mountains. While the Western Slope is true desert. However to say that the Western Slope doesn't have much snow is true only for the lower-lying towns like Grand Junction. The mountains like the Grand Mesa which is 20 miles east of Junction, are very snowy in the winter.
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Old 07-16-2010, 11:04 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,139,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
The Front Range is known for consistent and reliable afternoon thunderstorms (in the summer months) while this does not occur on the Western Slope. The Front Range is quite snowy in the winter while the Western Slope not so much.

The Front Range is not quite "desert" it's more of Great Plains + mountains. While the Western Slope is true desert. However to say that the Western Slope doesn't have much snow is true only for the lower-lying towns like Grand Junction. The mountains like the Grand Mesa which is 20 miles east of Junction, are very snowy in the winter.
I've been researching Colorado climate for nearly 40 years. Most of what is said above is true--I will add a few clarifications.

The snowiest areas of Colorado are the high mountains west of the Continental Divide--especially the San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado. Wolf Creek Pass is usually listed, along with Cumbres Pass, as being the snowiest locales in Colorado. Now, Cumbres Pass is actually completely on the Eastern Slope, but is an anomaly because it sits on the divide between the Rio Chama and Rio de Los Pinos river drainages at just over 10,000 ft. elevation, both streams eventually draining into the Rio Grande. But, the Continental Divide is actually west of Chama, New Mexico at a point called "Azotea" (Spanish for "roof" and you won't find it on most maps--it was a point on the narrow gauge railroad) at around 8,000 ft. elevation. So, climatically, Cumbres Pass behaves like it is on the Continental Divide, even though it is not. While average snowfall totals are generally higher in the high mountains of southwestern Colorado, they also tend to be less reliable from year to year than in northern Colorado west of the Continental Divide.

Thunderstorm frequency is even more complex. The two most thunderstorm-prone areas are the area on and just south of the Palmer Divide, which includes Colorado Springs, and around Raton Mesa and east of the Sangre de Cristos in far southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. The latter area affects Trinidad. Though less so than the above-mentioned areas, the high mountains of the San Juan Mountains are very thunderstorm-prone in summer. The San Juans are fairly climatically unique in the United States in that they receive very heavy snowfall in winter, but are also very thunderstorm-prone in summer. Only a few mountain ranges in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado sport that combination of weather on a typical basis in North America. Though the mountains of northern Colorado, especially east of the Continental Divide, get considerable thunderstorm activity, they do not get it at the frequency that the southern part of the state does. However, some of the storms on the Eastern side of the Continental Divide in northern Colorado can be truly savage in that they can cause severe flash floods--the Big Thompson flood of 1976, one of the deadliest floods in US history--was the result of one such complex of storms.

The areas of least thunderstorm activity and most benign storms are the lower elevation valleys of western Colorado and the valley floor of the San Luis Valley. In the latter case, the mountains surrounding the valley on all sides can have frequent and active thunderstorm activity, but they seldom pass over the valley floor.

There is a "slot" of comparatively less thunderstorm activity from about Denver's northern suburbs to Fort Collins, essentially following the I-25 corridor--however, the storms that do occur over that area can be quite severe at times. Thunderstorm activity increases again as one moves northward to Cheyenne, Wyoming, then decreases again north of there. All of the Front Range of Colorado and southernmost Wyoming, extending out onto the Eastern Plains, is part of "Hail Alley"--an area of both frequent and very severe hailstorms. Climatologists consider it one of the most hail-prone areas of the United States, and local insurance rates for both autos and homes reflect that.

I could go on, but I think one can get the general idea--Colorado's climate is no simple matter, and few generalizations are accurate.
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