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Old 08-31-2010, 12:42 PM
 
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Since Pueblo is about 50% Hispanic, does that mean you better speak Spanish to survive there. Do service industry workers have to know Spanish to even be considered?

Just wondering how important knowing the language is there? Do most non-hispanics there know it, and is it a problem for those that don't? Or do most Hispanics there speak English too?
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Old 08-31-2010, 01:56 PM
 
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I don't know a SINGLE US-born Hispanic in Colorado who does not speak English, and I know a lot of Hispanics here. Some may prefer to speak Spanish among their family and/or friends, but they all speak English, too. Immigrants, legal or otherwise, can be another matter. Southern Colorado, including Pueblo, is heavily Hispanic, but--from my experience--a larger percentage of the Hispanics in southern Colorado are long-time Colorado or New Mexico-born Hispanics as opposed to immigrants. In the resort areas and cities of northern Colorado, I think the opposite is true.

That said, knowing some Spanish is a plus, but not really necessary. Live in southern Colorado very long, and you will be using some Spanish in your vocabulary just from osmosis--especially the slang and cuss words.

As an aside, most southern Colorado-born Hispanics speak the same variation of old Castilian Spanish spoken in northern New Mexico. They can somtimes have issues conversing in Spanish with the Mexican Hispanics--a lot of difference in the dialect and the meanings of some words.
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Old 08-31-2010, 02:02 PM
 
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I should also point out that many Hispanics in Southern Colorado do not even know Spanish, as English has replaced it.
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Old 08-31-2010, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
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I have lived in Pueblo all my life, except for college, and I can not speak spanish or understand it. So to answer the op's question, no you do not need to know Spanish to live in Pueblo.
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Old 08-31-2010, 09:59 PM
 
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I have to take the other side of the discussion on this. I don't want to be illiterate around half of the people I live amongst. Spanish is important today and becoming more so all the time. I grew up in Texas and had every opportunity to learn Spanish and really regret not having done so. I have lived in Germany for twenty years and have come to understand the importance of being able to communicate with your neighbors in their language, even if they can also speak English. Becoming fluent in Spanish is a priority for me as I prepare to live in Colorado. BTW, I am a blue-eyed "Anglo", not an Hispanic. I predict that the US, or what is left of it, will be a Spanish speaking country within fifty years.
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Old 08-31-2010, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
I have to take the other side of the discussion on this. I don't want to be illiterate around half of the people I live amongst. Spanish is important today and becoming more so all the time. I grew up in Texas and had every opportunity to learn Spanish and really regret not having done so. I have lived in Germany for twenty years and have come to understand the importance of being able to communicate with your neighbors in their language, even if they can also speak English. Becoming fluent in Spanish is a priority for me as I prepare to live in Colorado. BTW, I am a blue-eyed "Anglo", not an Hispanic. I predict that the US, or what is left of it, will be a Spanish speaking country within fifty years.
Wow. Really? What's left of it? English is, by far, the dominant language in Colorado and the United States. It will continue to be this way for many decades to come. You do not need to know Spanish to live in Colorado.

First of all, like other immigrants before this, the transition to English speaking will be generational. The first generation speaks little English, the second generation is bilingual, the third generation is English dominant. This is due largely to the fact that English is the language of instruction in public schools. As children grow up in the USA, they will find that they do not want to return to the country of their ancestors, and they will assimilate more in the American culture at the expense of their Mexican heritage.

I also find it amazing that you think a country with 111 million people will be able to overrun a country of 311 million people through immigration resulting in the entire population to speaking Spanish in the next 50 years.

Stop listening to Tom Tancredo, Glen Beck and Rush Limbaugh. Like most politicians they are using scare tactics to advance their agenda.

Pueblo is 50% Hispanic because the area was part of Mexico 150 years ago. These people's families did not cross the border, the border crossed them as the US expanded. Over that time, they have become English dominant and many hardly know any Spanish.

By the way, I am a brown-eyed Hispanic whose family moved to New Mexico 350 years ago and to Colorado 120 years ago, and I don't speak Spanish.
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Old 09-01-2010, 03:54 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidv View Post
I don't speak Spanish.
Por que no? I can't really argue with you because neither of us can see the future. It is my expectation based on what I see happening today. There are many more countries south of us than just Mexico.




PS: Why on earth do you think I listen to the likes of Limbaugh? No Limbaugh, no Olberman, no paid touts for any point of view.
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Old 09-01-2010, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Pueblo, CO urbanized area, in 2000 (in percents of total population):

40.9% Hispanic (43.2% in 2008)
3.1% foreign born (3.5% in 2008)
15.2% spoke Spanish at home
82.9% spoke English only
5.0% spoke English less than very well

Source: US Census (note: no stats on language spoken at home for 2008)

I would think one could get by with "English only", considering 95% of Pueblo residents have no problem speaking it. Even up here in Denver, I've only used Spanish a handful of times in three years.
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Old 02-04-2012, 07:31 PM
 
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Well, the further north ones goes, the less Spanish one knows, I guess. I took Spanish classes because I wanted to be a Latina, and didn't really feel like one until I could speak in Spanish to somebody, and find out that there is something "special" about knowing and speaking Spanish. It's not enough to "understand", you have to "hablar" lo, so that's how I became bonafide Latina. Now, this is easier said than done because although I can and do speak Spanish, I don't speak it on a daily basis, so I have to really turn on "Cristina" radio or the Spanish television, and I have to review my Spanish by myself everyday. Anyone care to converse? I'd love to. Hasta luego!
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Old 02-05-2012, 07:25 PM
 
Location: playing in the colorful Colorado dirt
4,486 posts, read 4,323,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WannaBeLatina View Post
Well, the further north ones goes, the less Spanish one knows, I guess. I took Spanish classes because I wanted to be a Latina, and didn't really feel like one until I could speak in Spanish to somebody, and find out that there is something "special" about knowing and speaking Spanish. It's not enough to "understand", you have to "hablar" lo, so that's how I became bonafide Latina. Now, this is easier said than done because although I can and do speak Spanish, I don't speak it on a daily basis, so I have to really turn on "Cristina" radio or the Spanish television, and I have to review my Spanish by myself everyday. Anyone care to converse? I'd love to. Hasta luego!
You wanted to be a Latina?

Are you of Hispanic descent and just never learned the language? I'm Irish/Welsh, never learned either language but I still identify with my heritage.

It was just such a curious comment that it got me to wondering.
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