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Old 07-07-2007, 11:10 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
Reputation: 9065

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I've never seen so much misinformation about such a simple topic. If you want to register a vehicle in Colorado that is currently registered out-of-state:

1. You must get a VIN inspection. Most police departments or county sheriff's offices can do this.

2. If you are in a county requiring emission inspection and have a vehicle subject to emission inspection, that must be completed and the paperwork submitted when registering.

3. Once you have the VIN inspection and emission certification (if required), take the paperwork to the County Clerk's office in the county in which you reside. You will have to have the title from your prior state (if the vehicle is financed, and the lender holds the title, check with the county clerk's office to find out what they need), and the vehicle's registration.

3. Pay the fees (both registration and ownership tax). You will get Colorado plates to place on your vehicle. If your vehicle is not financed, the clerk's office will generally print your Colorado title for you on the spot. In order to register a vehicle in Colorado, you MUST have a Colorado physical address--just a PO Box won't cut it. Most county clerks don't accept credit cards, and all fees must be paid at the time of registration.

Colorado registration fees include the property tax component, so you won't get any separate bill for that. Fees in Colorado are pretty steep for new vehicles, but drop fairly quickly as the vehicle ages. Sales tax is a whole 'nuther issue, and can get complex. Generally, if the sales tax has been paid on the vehicle when it was registered in another state, it won't be due in Colorado.

If you buy a vehicle for which sales tax was not charged at the time of sale to you, and you have not previously registered it in another state, you will have to pay sales tax (in full) to the County Clerk when you register it in Colorado. Dependent on location, that can be from 3%-8%+ of the vehicle's sale price.
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Old 07-07-2007, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,958 posts, read 98,776,620 times
Reputation: 31371
Thank you jazzlover. I agree there was a ton of misinformation going back and forth. Some of what you said is what I thought to be true, but I didn't want to post w/o having the correct info.
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Old 07-07-2007, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
3,940 posts, read 13,064,209 times
Reputation: 2200
Thank You Jazzlover-

I was getting confused too!
I don't feel SO bad now!
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Old 07-07-2007, 11:45 AM
 
Location: The 719
13,624 posts, read 21,483,824 times
Reputation: 13275
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I've never seen so much misinformation about such a simple topic. If you want to register a vehicle in Colorado that is currently registered out-of-state:

1. You must get a VIN inspection. Most police departments or county sheriff's offices can do this.

2. If you are in a county requiring emission inspection and have a vehicle subject to emission inspection, that must be completed and the paperwork submitted when registering.

3. Once you have the VIN inspection and emission certification (if required), take the paperwork to the County Clerk's office in the county in which you reside. You will have to have the title from your prior state (if the vehicle is financed, and the lender holds the title, check with the county clerk's office to find out what they need), and the vehicle's registration.

3. Pay the fees (both registration and ownership tax). You will get Colorado plates to place on your vehicle. If your vehicle is not financed, the clerk's office will generally print your Colorado title for you on the spot. In order to register a vehicle in Colorado, you MUST have a Colorado physical address--just a PO Box won't cut it. Most county clerks don't accept credit cards, and all fees must be paid at the time of registration.

Colorado registration fees include the property tax component, so you won't get any separate bill for that. Fees in Colorado are pretty steep for new vehicles, but drop fairly quickly as the vehicle ages. Sales tax is a whole 'nuther issue, and can get complex. Generally, if the sales tax has been paid on the vehicle when it was registered in another state, it won't be due in Colorado.

If you buy a vehicle for which sales tax was not charged at the time of sale to you, and you have not previously registered it in another state, you will have to pay sales tax (in full) to the County Clerk when you register it in Colorado. Dependent on location, that can be from 3%-8%+ of the vehicle's sale price.

So what's your point, JL? How is your posting any less confusing than prior people from Colorado's experience?

Don't let the facts get in the way of a good post! How is "Most county clerks don't accept credit cards, and all fees must be paid at the time of registration." any more simple and any less misinformed than a statement like "In Pueblo County, you'd better bring the green or a check."

Then there's this one; "Sales tax is a whole 'nuther issue, and can get complex." Some of these posters have run into this and others may not.

Is anything in this quote NOT true of Colorado law? "If it has an engine or motor and is able to roam the roads and highways of Colorado legally, it most likely needs to be registered with the Department of Revenue's Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV). The registering party is basically defined as one accountable for a vehicle whether or not the owner of said vehicle. In Colorado it is generally an annual process for residents and in most cases, once you are set up with tags and plates, can be done via mail.

The exception is when a vehicle is due for emissions testing, or if a vehicle has been tagged by Colorado's insurance identification program as uninsured.

The DMV provides registration forms for various plates and vehicle types available for download .

License fees are constant and assessed by the empty weight of the vehicle being registered. The only variations in costs from year to year are based on fluctuation in local sales taxes or various ownership taxes. Cash and check are the only means of payment.

Non-resident exemptions from ownership taxes are given in certain circumstances to those in the military. A completed affidavit of nonresidence is required.
Recent Residents

You must register your vehicle (or vehicles) within 30 days of establishing Colorado residency. Residency is defined by being in-state for a string of 90 days, owning a business or being employed in the state, or just having a Colorado license in your wallet.


Specifically, what about the gross weight? If I've always driven a 1/2 ton pickup or a passenger car, is that different than if I'm registering a 3/4 ton SUV? I'd agree that the fees drop rapidly from year to year. Is that due to depreciation of the vehicle or some other factors?

All I know about out-of-staters is that our law is drastically different and drastically more expensive than what it is in Florida. Money out of yo wallet seems pretty simple and informative to me.[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 07-07-2007, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Mesa
3,766 posts, read 8,236,173 times
Reputation: 2932
<i>My co-workers from Florida say that they tried to add this state tax to their system and the people of Florida stood up, bowed their necks and said, "Oh no U di int, sista", so they don't pay it.</i>

We don't want it because a) sales tax is paid at time of purchase, and b) cars are registered annually and fees paid to the county for tags. Why the heck would we want to add a 3rd fee/tax to the mix?
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Old 07-07-2007, 07:38 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
Reputation: 9065
Well, I didn't want to complicate things by saying that there are currently about 60+ different types of plates that Colorado issues to vehicles--the samples usually take up a whole wall at the County Clerk's office. To answer what I think was the question in your post, McGowdog, Colorado motor vehicle fees are based on the value, age, and weight of the vehicle--so, a 3/4 ton truck will cost more to license than an otherwise comparable 1/2 ton.

As to license fees in Colorado, I'd put them in about the middle nationally. A lot of states have very cheap vehicle license fees, but ALSO charge a separate personal property tax which is billed apart from the license fee. Around the Rocky Mountain region, New Mexico is one of the cheaper states to register a vehicle because the fee is essentially based on the vehicle's weight and age only. I understand that Arizona's plates are generally much higher. In Wyoming, plates for newer vehicles are generally cheaper than Colorado, but the fees do not drop as fast or far as Colorado's do as the vehicle ages. I know this for a fact because I have family in Colorado who registers similar vehicles to what I register in Wyoming. If I recall, Kansas license fees are cheap, but it is one of the states that charges a separate property tax.

Where Colorado dings people pretty good is on sales tax. In many locations the combination of state, county, and local sales tax can top 8%. On a $25,000 new car that hurts. Oh yeah, Colorado also has one of the higher state fuel taxes in the nation. Colorado is by no means a cheap state in which to own a vehicle and drive it. Colorado's auto insurance rates can be pretty high, too. After the major hailstorm that hit the Denver area in 1990 (one of the top 5 disasters in dollar damage up to that time), a number of insurance companies quit writing auto insurance in Colorado. Some have never come back.

My other pet peeve about Colorado is that they abolished county coding on license plates several years back. You can tell an old-line Coloradan because they can usually tell you the letters that were the county code for their county. There are still a few of the old county-coded plates running around, but they are getting rare. Wyoming still uses a one or two number prefix that designates the county in which the vehicle is registered.
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Old 07-08-2007, 07:53 PM
 
Location: The 719
13,624 posts, read 21,483,824 times
Reputation: 13275
Good post, JL. Now I understand it a little better. GE I think was Pueblo county and VE for Huerfano.

With all the dough it costs to get into your car and drive it (tags, sales tax, gas tax, and insurance) thank goodness we have such nice roads to drive on.
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Old 07-08-2007, 08:23 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
Reputation: 9065
GP-HX - Pueblo County
VE-VF - Huerfano County

The way the letters were organized followed the numbering convention that preceded it. From around the 1920's to 1959, the plates had a numeric designation for the county (like Wyoming still does). As I recall from my Colorado history, the numbering sequence was based on the population rank of the counties by the 1920 census.

So, Denver County was 1, Pueblo county was 2, Weld County was 3, etc. In 1959, the state went to the two-letter alpha designation for counties, but used the same order that was used for the numerics. So, Denver was AA-GN, Pueblo GP-HX, Weld HY-JW, etc.

In the '80's they went to a three-letter county designation (totally different than the two-letter ones), and then scrapped the county designation altogether in the early 90's.

Back when, there were no vanity plates, government plates, etc. The Colorado Governor had Denver County plate AA-1 on his limosuine. Having a "low number"--a number less than 1000 for the first letter designation for the county (i.e., GP-1 through GP-999 for Pueblo County, for example) was considered "prestigious", and the county clerk would let individuals keep the same number from year-to-year (plates were replaced annually back when) if the individual renewed their plates before a certain deadline. Some plate numbers were in the same individual's name for 30 years or more because of that. All that fuss, then and now (what with vanity plates, etc. today) just for what basically is a tax receipt!
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Old 07-09-2007, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
3,940 posts, read 13,064,209 times
Reputation: 2200
Wow! In South Dakota things are so simple:
Sioux Falls-1
Rapid City-2
Aberdeen-3

Us dern'd country bumpkins ain't used to 'dem sofisticated numberz like u big city folks! Haha!
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Old 11-14-2007, 07:06 PM
 
1 posts, read 26,620 times
Reputation: 10
We are going to buy a new car in Texas and then moving to Colorado (Boulder) - how much is the registration fee in Boulder? Does anybody has any idea?
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