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Old 07-07-2007, 11:04 AM
tao
 
Location: Colorado
720 posts, read 2,917,511 times
Reputation: 928

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I think you can find everything you're looking for in Broomfield which is a suburb between Boulder (college town, great medical facilities, very liberal, amazing restaurants - and this is coming from someone who grew up eating at the finest restaurants in the world) and Denver. Broomfield has a Target, Walmart, a huge, very nice indoor/outdoor mall with a cinema, and plenty of other big box shopping. Superior, a five minute drive away, has a Super-Target, Wild Oats, Michaels, Ross, TJ Maxx, Pet Smart, Costco, Office Maxx, Sports Authority, etc.

My husband and I are moving to Broomfield as soon as our house in Florida sells. We like how close it is to both Boulder and Denver - we can have the best of both worlds plus it's close to the mountains and nature. And just as important, the cost of housing is a lot more affordable in Broomfield than it is in Boulder and Superior yet it's only a fifteen minute drive to all Boulder has to offer and a twenty minute drive to Denver.
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Old 07-07-2007, 11:11 AM
 
Location: The 719
13,693 posts, read 21,517,011 times
Reputation: 13314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nadine View Post
Why people here like to run Pueblo down, I really do not know. But check it out anyway. Only about 30 mins from CC No matter. It may be a fit. Or you might check out some other small towns close around closer into the mts. but within 40 to 45 miles to either Pueblo or Colorado Spings. Usual time time travel around 30 mins. Pueblo is probably the less expensive. On the plains and is hotter and cooler than farther west in the summer. But warmer in winter than the Springs and less snow on the norm. Low humidity. In this area.
It is in vogue to slam the once thriving blue-collar town. That and we have the State Hospital here and you've got the butt of many jokes. Keep it that way. It keeps things affordable for me.[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 07-07-2007, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,020 posts, read 98,892,281 times
Reputation: 31456
It is in vogue to slam the once thriving blue-collar town.

I agree. I grew up in a factory town, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. It's not anywhere near as bucolic as it sounds. Industrial, even for the Pittsburgh area! I just told my DH the other day that I hate to hear people putting down factory towns. How do they think they are getting their cars, etc, if someone doesn't make them? I like Pueblo. It reminds me of the steel towns in PA.
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Old 07-07-2007, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Colorado
4 posts, read 25,603 times
Reputation: 12
Default Parts of CO may be perfect for you.

Fort Collins has everything you are looking for but, the mass transportation is poor at best. We have good medical care (PVH is one of the best hospitals). Great schools (Pre - K through College). Our population is becoming more diverse. Cultural events you may find a bit lacking but, check out the KUNC website (public radio station) for what is happening in the region.

Colorado is a rather conservative state with those of us who lean to the left tucked in for balance. Personally I find Colorado Springs can make you wonder if the bible belt busted loose and cloned itself out west.
Parts of the Denver area have everything you are looking for. Their light rail system is growing which could make everyones life easier, faster and have cleaner air.
Downside. Colorado does get snow. Dry snow but, it can leave you buried in a blizzard. Some winters are very mild. Some winters will remind you of NY with snow on the ground for months at a time. Housing - we are expensive but, then again so in NY. Check out houses that have earned an ENERGY STAR rating to save on your heating and cooling bills.
If you have breathing issues, we have polluted air, no doubt about that. Our "Brown Cloud" can blanket us in our own filth.
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Old 07-08-2007, 01:19 PM
 
183 posts, read 931,076 times
Reputation: 83
Are you looking for an authentic neighborhood or a new, earth-toned subdivision with no trees? I only ask because I've spent time in both NYC and Denver. Many of the places being recommend could be a rude awakening if you are used to the charm and neighborhood feel that you get in the colorful blocks of Manhattan.
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Old 07-08-2007, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Bayside, NY
823 posts, read 3,311,080 times
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Lindenin,

I live in a tract house on Long Island and that is the last thing that I want when we move. When I lived in MA (and had a dog kennel} I had 6 acres of land). We used to also own a vacation house in the Catskill Mts on 1 1/2 acres that was 6 miles away from the nearest town so I know what real rural living is like. I would prefer a house on a piece of land (could be small) that isn''t near any neighbors. It doesn't have to be isolated and we want to be near the usual conveniences.

We are not outdoorsy people we just like quiet and privacy.
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Old 07-08-2007, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,020 posts, read 98,892,281 times
Reputation: 31456
norm: I would prefer a house on a piece of land (could be small) that isn''t near any neighbors. It doesn't have to be isolated and we want to be near the usual conveniences.

You will have to look a good deal for that in any of the more urban areas. This isn't the NE with 1/2 acre lots being minimum lot size in some areas. 1/4 acre is considered large. Good luck!
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Old 07-19-2007, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Yoder, Colorado - Colorado Springs, Colorado
25 posts, read 74,031 times
Reputation: 13
Hello,
Colorado Springs fits all your needs..we did get a lot of snow this last winter, but it snows then melts away, and you get to stay home that day.

Last edited by mdz; 07-19-2007 at 12:49 PM.. Reason: soliciting
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Old 07-20-2007, 11:45 AM
 
1,267 posts, read 2,987,959 times
Reputation: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by norm View Post
I am retired and my wife will be retiring in the next few years at which time we plan on moving away from the NYC area. I would like to know if there is an area in CO that meets our requirement or at least most of them.

Lower humidity level (very important for health reasons).
Mild winters without a lot of snow.
Near a city with a college (for cultural events).
Good medical facilities nearby.
Not too conservative.
Good shopping i.e. Lowes or Home Depot, Dept. Stores, Target, etc.
Decent restaurants.
Houses below $250,000.
Reasonable taxes.

Any recommendations would be appreciated.
-MUCH lower humidity, here, than most places in the contig-48 states. sunny, too, usually.
-mild winters in general, and even colder temps feel warmer due to the altitude (relative lack of air to scatter sunlight and to pull heat from you...though night time tends to get pretty cold, to, as a result of the relative lack of air and moisture, basically). some somewhat significant snow storms (not like the great lakes, or high in the mountians, e.g.) in some of the lower lands of CO, but often melts quickly (INTENSE sunshine at this altitude)
-here's where it could start to get a little trickier. much of colorado is conservative (all is conservative relative to some places in the northeast) and will NOT be "cultured" like a NYC (though thre is some latin flavor and western flavor, but, maybe not the kind of cujlture you're looking for sometimes), so now you have to start picking and choosing to find the balance of liberal/cultured/college-y. maybe ft collins, near boulder, near durango, even in denver might work, though none is "liberal" like you find in some of NY, CT, MASS, VT, etc.. all of those are pretty "liberal" for colorado.
-denver has "good" medical facilities, e.g.. has the #1 respiratory treatment facility in the nation, e.g., and an exceptional university hospital system.
-most of colorado will be more conservative than NYC. even boulder, the sort of liberal bastion of colorado is pretty reserved/anglo/homogenized and sort of politically correct versus truly contentiously "liberal" or progressive. but, basically "liberal" there and denver votes democratic these days, while being pretty white bred or otherwise segregated (but not racist, that i see, though maybe sort of "under-exposed" to some things the coasts get more exposure to - coasts and maybe a few places mid-continent tend to be more diverse, generally, it seems).
-the burbs of denver would be heaven for someone that loves lowes/homedepot/shopping. it is franchise-america all around the front range
-restaurants will pale relative to NYC. there are some good ones, and even a few of those good ones are CONSISTENTLY good around denver and boulder, e.g.. much of the mexican and southwestern tends to be rather good around colorado, i find.
-houses below $250k might be tricky to find, at least around the front range (especially in and near boulder and denver)
-property taxes are incredibly low around denver, e.g.

good luck.
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Old 07-20-2007, 06:08 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,520,804 times
Reputation: 1457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindenin View Post
Are you looking for an authentic neighborhood or a new, earth-toned subdivision with no trees? I only ask because I've spent time in both NYC and Denver. Many of the places being recommend could be a rude awakening if you are used to the charm and neighborhood feel that you get in the colorful blocks of Manhattan.
It's not true that "Denver" is all cookie-cutter neighborhoods with no trees. In fact, you'll find very little of that in Denver (proper), where most of the neighborhoods have very large and old trees and are largely not cookie-cutter or earth toned.

But you're right that we're not Manhattan or anything close to it, though, that's for sure. But then again, there's no place in this country like Manhattan.
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