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View Poll Results: How do you pronounce Colorado?
Col-o-rad-o 69 38.55%
Col-o-rod-o 94 52.51%
Neither/Both ways 16 8.94%
Voters: 179. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 10-31-2010, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 15,783,647 times
Reputation: 6455
Quote:
Originally Posted by dnvrsoul View Post
If you are a native or have lived in the state for awhile that is how it is pronounced-don't pronounce it Colorodo..then we know you are an idiot and trying to sound smart.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Most every Colorado native I know pronounces it with the Spanish pronunciation. Midwesterners and other transplants and pilgrims usually are the ones saying Colo-ra-do with the short "a", rather than the "ah" Spanish pronunciation.
So dnvrsoul how do we square what you're saying with ol' Bear Claw here? Perhaps there are different "native tribes" with different ways?

In the poll the "rods" seem to be gaining on the "rads". I always that the "rod" people were from the East. I've also never heard the name of the river pronounced with a "rod". Speaking of rivers, the Florida that runs through La Plata is pronounced "Flo-ree-duh". I imagine that's how the locals at the time it was christened pronounced the name of that state.

 
Old 10-31-2010, 09:01 AM
 
16,448 posts, read 10,258,436 times
Reputation: 9173
I'll accept John Denver's pronunciation as indisputable: "Rocky Mountain High, Colorado..."
 
Old 10-31-2010, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
1,520 posts, read 1,778,130 times
Reputation: 2443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
I'll accept John Denver's pronunciation as indisputable: "Rocky Mountain High, Colorado..."
John Denver was not a Colorado native.

Thus, by Jazzlover's logic, he contributed to the ruination of the state and is burning in hell.

If he's burning in hell, his pronunciation was probably not correct.

QED
 
Old 10-31-2010, 10:22 AM
 
16,448 posts, read 10,258,436 times
Reputation: 9173
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaTransplant View Post
John Denver was not a Colorado native.

Thus, by Jazzlover's logic, he contributed to the ruination of the state and is burning in hell.
Now you have made me immensely sad.
 
Old 10-31-2010, 11:53 AM
 
7,994 posts, read 15,565,861 times
Reputation: 8005
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaTransplant View Post
John Denver was not a Colorado native.

Thus, by Jazzlover's logic, he contributed to the ruination of the state and is burning in hell.

If he's burning in hell, his pronunciation was probably not correct.

QED
John Denver definitely was not a Colorado native. He was, in fact, an "Army brat" who lived all over the country in his youth. He created considerable controversy in Colorado in the late 1970's when he had large underground fuel storage tanks installed at his property in Aspen--sort of a hypocritical act when one listens to his environmental bent on tunes like "Rocky Mountain High." For the record, I sat across the aisle from him on an airplane flight back in the early 1970's--right before "Rocky Mountain High" came out. We had a nice chat--he was quite personable in a one-on-one conversation. And he was known to mispronounce Colorado on occasion with his Midwestern accent. All of that said, a lot of what the lyric of "Rocky Mountain High" says came true--especially this part:

Quote:
Now his life is full of wonder but his heart still knows some fear
Of a simple thing he cannot comprehend
Why they try to tear the mountains down to bring in a couple more
More people, more scars upon the land
 
Old 10-31-2010, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,574 posts, read 2,319,992 times
Reputation: 1627
I pronounce it "rod", and it seems most of the Denverites I know (native or not) do as well, but it does seem like natives from the rest of the state tend toward "rad". Of all my poor habits, this is one of the more difficult, and least likely to change.
 
Old 10-31-2010, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Bend, OR
2,976 posts, read 4,766,435 times
Reputation: 2875
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Most every Colorado native I know pronounces it with the Spanish pronunciation. Midwesterners and other transplants and pilgrims usually are the ones saying Colo-ra-do with the short "a", rather than the "ah" Spanish pronunciation. The number who responded to the poll by voting for the bastardized English pronunciation just show how overrun the state is with non-natives . . . 'nuff said.
Interesting Jazzlover as my family is one of the long time "natives" (I'm 10th generation born) and we've always pronounced in Colo-ra-do! I don't think it's necessarily an indication of where your from or how long you've been in the state. Just look at Buena Vista. You don't see the long time locals saying that one with the correct Spanish pronunciation!
 
Old 10-31-2010, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Colorado
877 posts, read 821,678 times
Reputation: 685
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
Since you're in Oklahoma, how do you like the way Miami is pronounced there?
I don't understand your question. I know it's either pronounced "Mee-am-uh" or "My-am-uh" instead of the one in Florida that we all know about, "My-am-ee." But what does that have to do with anything? Is there a town named Colorado in North Dakota that's pronounced differently or something?
 
Old 10-31-2010, 01:54 PM
 
16,448 posts, read 10,258,436 times
Reputation: 9173
I was bringing into the discussion that local variations on generaly accepted pronunciation is not unusual. Nothing more; I like Oklahoma (used to live in Tulsa).
 
Old 10-31-2010, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 15,783,647 times
Reputation: 6455
Quote:
Originally Posted by delta07 View Post
Interesting Jazzlover as my family is one of the long time "natives" (I'm 10th generation born)
I'm not disputing what you're saying but I'm somewhat curious how you get back that many generations, even if you're fairly young. A generation on average is 20 years so normally 10 back would be 200 years. There weren't too many non-Indians in the state before the 1850s. If you have 10 generations back born there that would normally mean there was at least one more that migrated to the state sometime before the first one was born, taking it even further back in time. 10 generations for me would go back to the 1600s easily. Now if you're an Indian then that's a different story, but then the question is raised how do you know it was 10? The Indians didn't keep any written records back then. Oral history?
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