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Old 08-16-2013, 10:36 PM
 
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Persons chosen by the people to distribute the graft.
— Mark Twain on public servants



I just ran across an interesting statistic: that according the the US Energy Information Administration there are 36,000 fracking wells in the United States.

Sounds like an awful lot, so I decided to check. Turns out the actual number far exceeds that. Between 1990 and 2009 the number of natural gas wells in the United States, spread across 31 states, doubled to 493,000. 90 percent of them used fracking.

In Colorado, the number of active oil and gas wells doubled between 2000 and 2010 to 43,354. According to the BLM (Bureau of Land Management), 95 percent of natural gas wells in Colorado used fracking. [1]

Our esteemed and most honorable governor, John Hickenlooper, says no water in Colorado has been contaminated by fracking, as well that fracking fluids are edible. Although he apparently is not a regular imbiber, as still here with us. A former petroleum engineer, he has appeared in industry-funded advertisements on radio and in newspapers supporting fracking. Perhaps encouraged by the $75,000 "campaign donation" he accepted in 2010, and appointing one of these "campaign donors" to a regulatory position.


1) 'Fracking,' SourceWatch
Fracking - SourceWatch
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Old 08-17-2013, 07:04 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
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In the Four Corners, fracking operations are planned for BLM land just east of Mesa Verde National Park. Mesa Verde draws in thousands of tourist dollars every year that the Cortez economy depends on. Fracking next to Mesa Verde will impact air and water quality in the region among other things. The current Director of Mesa Verde who has to toe the party line, says Mesa Verde would be thrilled to having fracking operations right on its perimeter. The former director, now retired and still living in the region says air pollution and noise from fracking operations will have a major negative impact on the experience of Mesa Verde visitors.

Fracking operations are also planned for BLM land at Canyon of the Ancients west of town as well as on adjacent private land. Water and soils outside of Mancos have been polluted with mercury from a gold mining outfit that is declaring bankruptcy. More will be revealed - so they say.

I don't see how they're going to get the water for all this fracking around here. There is no for hardly ANYONE thanks to the drought. Is Halliburton going to pick off everyone in the region with drones, so it can access Cortez municipal water supplies along with stealing the irrigation rights of hard pressed wheat and pinto bean farmers with no one left to complain?

Think I just might mosey on over and pick up a few new survey flags for my collection. Nothing else to do around here on a Saturday night.
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Old 08-17-2013, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
33,809 posts, read 14,225,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
In the Four Corners, fracking operations are planned for BLM land just east of Mesa Verde National Park. Mesa Verde draws in thousands of tourist dollars every year that the Cortez economy depends on. Fracking next to Mesa Verde will impact air and water quality in the region among other things. The current Director of Mesa Verde who has to toe the party line, says Mesa Verde would be thrilled to having fracking operations right on its perimeter. The former director, now retired and still living in the region says air pollution and noise from fracking operations will have a major negative impact on the experience of Mesa Verde visitors.

Fracking operations are also planned for BLM land at Canyon of the Ancients west of town as well as on adjacent private land. Water and soils outside of Mancos have been polluted with mercury from a gold mining outfit that is declaring bankruptcy. More will be revealed - so they say.

I don't see how they're going to get the water for all this fracking around here. There is no for hardly ANYONE thanks to the drought. Is Halliburton going to pick off everyone in the region with drones, so it can access Cortez municipal water supplies along with stealing the irrigation rights of hard pressed wheat and pinto bean farmers with no one left to complain?

Think I just might mosey on over and pick up a few new survey flags for my collection. Nothing else to do around here on a Saturday night.
I'm not sure I buy the idea that noise pollution is going to be a significant problem in this situation. In terms of air and water pollution, I can see that as an issue.

But where I really think you hit the nail on the head is in terms of water resources used in fracking.
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Old 08-17-2013, 11:12 PM
 
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Wink Mesa Verde second to profit?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
... The current Director of Mesa Verde who has to toe the party line, says Mesa Verde would be thrilled to having fracking operations right on its perimeter. The former director, now retired and still living in the region says air pollution and noise from fracking operations will have a major negative impact on the experience of Mesa Verde visitors.

Fracking operations are also planned for BLM land at Canyon of the Ancients west of town as well as on adjacent private land ... I don't see how they're going to get the water for all this fracking around here. There is no for hardly ANYONE thanks to the drought.

Although having yet to mention it, I've read where the government is is close to, and perhaps past it, of allowing fracking operations on public lands, such as BLM. Perhaps we, the public, should have some say in this?

Not sure what the impact on Mesa Verde NP will be, although hardly imagining that fracking on the periphery of this national park will improve the visitor experience. It seems, as well, that they have plans for mining just beyond the borders of Grand Canyon NP. Or technically not encroaching, but basically desecrating our national treasures. From first hand experience with Rocky Mountain NP—if no more than in their allowing airplane overflights, and indeed far more than that—I'd say the NPS has not proven itself the stewards of our public lands that we the American people have the right to expect.

That the current overseer of Mesa Verde NP would dare suggest that nearby fracking is anything less than negative, or at best a necessary evil, is that in itself; he should have at least said nothing, preferably vociferously stood up for us, and his charge—or resigned in protest. But then that is his job and pension, so as usual money talks.

Good point also about where all the necessary water for this fracking may come from, as a single fracking well uses a great quantity. How exactly do they intend to secure this water, when even well established farmers do not have enough for their crops, pinto beans or otherwise?

***

At times it can be difficult at Mesa Verde NP to sense this, due all the tourists, but a key aspect of such places are that they are ancient, of another time and world. It was easier at Hovenweep National Monument (Canyon of the Ancients) to lose oneself in time and space among these ruins, and feel the mystery imbued within them. To the extent the modern world intrudes—with any fracking well certainly qualifying in that—then this experience greatly lessoned or more or less ruined.

One might to one degree or another say as much for all our national parks. Particularly the ones primarily wilderness serve as small islands and the last remnants of this within this nation. If we do not at last vigorously protect this, then what at last anything?

Last edited by Idunn; 08-17-2013 at 11:31 PM..
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Old 08-18-2013, 12:51 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Although having yet to mention it, I've read where the government is is close to, and perhaps past it, of allowing fracking operations on public lands, such as BLM. Perhaps we, the public, should have some say in this?

Not sure what the impact on Mesa Verde NP will be, although hardly imagining that fracking on the periphery of this national park will improve the visitor experience. It seems, as well, that they have plans for mining just beyond the borders of Grand Canyon NP. Or technically not encroaching, but basically desecrating our national treasures. From first hand experience with Rocky Mountain NP—if no more than in their allowing airplane overflights, and indeed far more than that—I'd say the NPS has not proven itself the stewards of our public lands that we the American people have the right to expect.

That the current overseer of Mesa Verde NP would dare suggest that nearby fracking is anything less than negative, or at best a necessary evil, is that in itself; he should have at least said nothing, preferably vociferously stood up for us, and his charge—or resigned in protest. But then that is his job and pension, so as usual money talks.

Good point also about where all the necessary water for this fracking may come from, as a single fracking well uses a great quantity. How exactly do they intend to secure this water, when even well established farmers do not have enough for their crops, pinto beans or otherwise?

***

At times it can be difficult at Mesa Verde NP to sense this, due all the tourists, but a key aspect of such places are that they are ancient, of another time and world. It was easier at Hovenweep National Monument (Canyon of the Ancients) to lose oneself in time and space among these ruins, and feel the mystery imbued within them. To the extent the modern world intrudes—with any fracking well certainly qualifying in that—then this experience greatly lessoned or more or less ruined.

One might to one degree or another say as much for all our national parks. Particularly the ones primarily wilderness serve as small islands and the last remnants of this within this nation. If we do not at last vigorously protect this, then what at last anything?
Well, I was going to give you the link for the article in the Cortez Journal but they've become very unreliable lately and their site is down. Plus, what appears to be an electronic bee just flew in the window and is hovering over my keyboard in a quite menacing manner. Hmmm...

If memory serves (and mine often doesn't), there was supposed to be a public comment period beginning August 15th re the fracking on BLM land between Mesa Verde and Durango. I've been wanting to research this further, but my attention has gotten distracted by a ridiculous landlord/tenant war that my absentee landlord seems to have started just for grins, plus I've been spending far too much time on forest service roads up saying goodbye to the San Juans.

The Journal named the outfit that will be fracking next door to Mesa Verde. If the Cortez Journal site ever comes up again, I'll start a thread about the info in the article. The company longing to frack Canyon of the Ancients is quite shy, and ran over to hide on private land when someone asked what its name was, the last I heard. However, when I was last out to C of A in June, there was sign of carbon exploitation exploration. Lots of over-sized tire tread marks running carelessly over everything and blue survey flags. Haven't been back to see if the survey flags have been replaced yet. Must add that to my "to do" list.

As for protesting, I'm about ready to throw atomic bombs myself, believe me. Obama is no better than our 43rd Oil King when it comes to carbon based energy exploration. I might better be able to stomach the fracking thing (although I doubt it), if at the very least I saw them doing stuff like upping the production of solar panels, wind farms, and other alternative energy sources with the time fracking SUPPOSEDLY is going to buy us. But the only thing I've noticed is the upping of more fracking. Typical.

I don't believe ANYTHING that comes from carbon based lips - never have, and so far my skepticism has proved well-founded. Once the entire country has been destroyed down to every last tree in the forests and every last acre of cropland - be it pinto or be it corn with fracking operations, what will they think of next? I dread to imagine. The good news is that "they" will have probably retreated to some secret, heavily guarded "refugia" of their own, finally leaving the planet free of their opportunistic ideas. The bad news is that there will be no more planet left.

Will our National Parks be up to the task of serving as refugia, even if Halliburten allows them to do so? Seems to me that many aren't large enough to have the carrying capacity for viable populations of very many animal species. Also, just for example - I wonder what will happen to plants and their pollinators. Will their symbiotic relationships - a product of hundreds of thousands of years of mutual adaptation and evolution - prove too fragile to withstand a projected global temperature increase of 4.5 C by 2100 or sooner?

That's just a single species interaction that I've been thinking about. We are pulling the supports out from under our environment at an alarming pace, and we are destroying complex ecological systems that haven't even been studied yet. We'll find out about them only after their gone and must deal with the result. Our national parks alone aren't up to the task of CPR for the ecosystems which thay are a part of and are surrounded by, especially not if they're going to be subjected to such major climatic change over such a short period of time. Perhaps Mesa Verde might be best devoted to preservation of Sonoran flora and fauna rather than the current floristics of SW Colorado?

I'm certainly not dismissing your outrage or your thoughts as to the role our National Parks might be able to play in serving to save some small part of our current ecosystems in the face of the on-coming environmental holocaust. But just considering this as a biologist, I must admit that I feel a little daunted by the prospect.
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Old 08-18-2013, 02:28 PM
 
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Wink All fracked up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
... Will our National Parks be up to the task of serving as refugia, even if Halliburten allows them to do so? Seems to me that many aren't large enough to have the carrying capacity for viable populations of very many animal species. Also, just for example - I wonder what will happen to plants and their pollinators. Will their symbiotic relationships - a product of hundreds of thousands of years of mutual adaptation and evolution - prove too fragile to withstand a projected global temperature increase of 4.5 C by 2100 or sooner?

That's just a single species interaction that I've been thinking about. We are pulling the supports out from under our environment at an alarming pace, and we are destroying complex ecological systems that haven't even been studied yet. We'll find out about them only after their gone and must deal with the result. Our national parks alone aren't up to the task of CPR for the ecosystems which thay are a part of and are surrounded by, especially not if they're going to be subjected to such major climatic change over such a short period of time. Perhaps Mesa Verde might be best devoted to preservation of Sonoran flora and fauna rather than the current floristics of SW Colorado?

I'm certainly not dismissing your outrage or your thoughts as to the role our National Parks might be able to play in serving to save some small part of our current ecosystems in the face of the on-coming environmental holocaust. But just considering this as a biologist, I must admit that I feel a little daunted by the prospect.


"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
— John Muir



Places such as Mesa Verde NP and Rocky Mountain NP—our first national park, Yellowstone, for that matter—all serve as small protected ecosystem islands.

But actual islands are in danger as well. The president of the nation of Kiribati, Anote Tong, has spoken to the government of Fiji about possibly buying 5,000 acres within that nation—as a new home to relocate all 102,697 of his people.

Lying about halfway between Hawaii and Australia, Kiribati is a nation of 32 low-lying atolls and one island slightly higher. Most of the population has already resettled on the one higher island, Tarawam, as the ever rising sea level has made the others uninhabitable.

The larger low-lying island chain of the Maldives off the southern coast of India, with a population of 393,988 (July 2013 estimate) is similarly threatened. As this one reference makes clear, there are presently a number of island nation states, including Micronesia, which are literally being swept away. While it may not sound like a lot, since 1870 the global sea level has risen some 8 inches; it is expected to rise an additional 8 to 16 inches above 1990 levels by 2090. [1]

The recent widespread destruction in New Jersey and flooding of subway tunnels in NYC was no accident. Strong storms of that nature can be expected to become more routine in future, and all the more destructive to seaboard cities, such as Miami, which were not designed towards anything other than a stable ocean level. If perhaps some justice in this, because while nations such as the United States will incur associated costs in the billions of dollars in consequence, we also are to a large part responsible for what is happening. While those in Tegue in the South Pacific, having become the first climate change refugees in 2005, largely are not. Yet, as oft the case, those least responsible are the first and most severely affected.

Meanwhile, back around here, our islands are no less threatened in various ways, and this not even speaking of Virgin Islands NP.

I read the figure where some 4/5ths of Mesa Verde NP has recently suffered wildfires. If natural, the greater intensity and number of these wildfires the last few decades is a result of our ever warming climate. Mesa Verde is as well concerned with the encroachment of non-native plant species. In Rocky Mountain NP they have been spraying herbicide in the park in trying to eradicate (or at least set back) various invasive plant species which are appearing due our changing climate. One will encounter signs here and there saying they have sprayed, so watch out for toxins inadvertently derived from same. Really, spraying herbicides in an officially designated wilderness area?

RMNP has suffered any number of other slights. One would be the recent construction of many miles of high metal fence enclosures throughout many of its meadows. This, again, in a park officially designated 95% wilderness (which by definition should remain "untrammeled" by mankind—or, basically, left the hell alone). The purpose of that is to prevent the elk from over browsing riparian vegetation near streams and adjacent meadow. This has become a serious problem due too many elk. As they are wont to wander about Estes Park at times, one will find many of the aspen in town have had a good deal of their white bark eaten off to a level as high as an elk can reach. In some attempt to forestall this, many aspen have protective metal mesh wrapped about their lower quarters.

That there are an overabundance of elk in RMNP speaks to a basic imbalance. As deer elsewhere, their numbers are no longer controlled by natural predators. Aside from all this awful fencing, RMNP has also hired killers (or, as I suspect, "sportsmen" friends of their's) to "cull" a good number of these elk. Yes, elk have been purposefully shot dead in that natural "sanctuary" of RMNP on the direct orders of the NPS.

But this very same outfit remains hesitant to see any large predators return to where they once roamed. They've said they might not actually track down and kill any wolf who might make its way back into RMNP (sign of which in a paw print was discovered a couple years ago), but they sure will not be advocating for or helping such a migration. Same for the grizzly bear, presumably. And a wonder that any mountain lions have managed to survive.

The thing is that the NPS, for all its misdeeds, finds itself between a rock and a hard place. I'll still say that rather than wilderness enclave they run RMNP more like an amusement park, and they do. But they also act as public servants who have to find some balance between preserving these ecosystems and a largely ignorant public who want to fish, go hiking, and not get eaten by a bear in the process. And a populace, if willing to tolerate a certain amount of potentially hazardous wildlife within these parks, sure doesn't want it one step beyond the borders.

Yellowstone NP remains our largest national park in the continental US, but is not immune from such things. As with Moraine Park in RMNP, its territory but one place where animals such as elk customarily foraged. Anyone having watched elk, for one, will know that they are constantly on the move. Which helps to protect the grasses they feed on from being over grazed. But also means that by nature they tend to travel widely. It is in no way natural they would remain within the relatively small islands that these national parks have become. Wolfs and bison that have wandered beyond the borders of Yellowstone NP have met an even less generous reception by neighboring ranchers—both being shot.

Even if all could be happily contained within what are at last relatively geographically small wilderness islands, in forsaking natural migration paths, they are not immune to that without. In something like 10 years or less the namesake glaciers of Glacier NP in Montana are expected to be all gone. That this the case has little to do with that wilderness area, and great deal to do with the outside world beyond it. Strange as it may seem, the glaciers in RMNP will probably outlast those in Glacier NP. But they melting as well, and both due our ever warming climate.

RMNP suffers a serious problem with air pollution. High ozone levels at times, for one. Also from airborne pollutants, such as nitrogen, which blow in to be deposited within the otherwise clean waters of lakes and rivers at its highest most remote elevations. Places where few if any humans ever go, and yet their existence strongly and negatively felt. If some of this deposition comes in from the Pacific and West Coast, the majority is manufactured right here along the Front Range of Colorado.

Such as feedlots, agriculture, traffic and, yes, fracking, all play a part. You had better bet that those fracking wells flaring flames of excess natural gas into the air in northeast Colorado are partly to blame. With that but a fraction of that going on, or suffered.

If it is ever built, the Keystone XL pipeline carrying bitumen oil from tar sand operations in Alberta, Canada will not even cross a portion of Colorado. But its greater effects will definitely be felt here. Even if that vast amount of very dirty oil were all shipped to China and burned there, the effects felt right here and in RMNP. Our climate is global. Those helping to most imbalance it are we the industrialized nations. But all on this planet, whether an island nation being submerged, or RMNP with entire mountainsides of lodgepole pine trees dead, are affected.

This is certainly one light by which fracking might be viewed. It is not free energy, and price to be paid. Even if its extraction did not threaten or harm air or water, its eventual use will. That anything is being fracked, being all the more a time and money intensive operation, speaks to the truth of Hubbert's Peak and the decline of readily available oil. Yet this widespread fracking with all its potential disadvantages is not done as some necessary stopgap until we can employ viable alternative energies, but seemingly only so a few may become wealthy at the expense of all others happy in the bargain to drive their huge SUVs one more thoughtless day.

Were there viable islands on this planet as refuge for those who actually value our ecosystem. But there are not.


1) '11 Islands That Will Vanish When Sea Levels Rise,' Business Insider
Islands Threatened By Climate Change - Business Insider
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Old 08-20-2013, 05:31 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
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There is a new movement afoot to take back the power from the corporations and put it back in the hands of the people through anti-fracking ordinances passed by local town counsels. This idea has great promise and I hope it spreads. Here's the preamble to anti-fracking ordinances enacted by a community in Maryland:

NATURAL GAS EXTRACTION ORDINANCE
AN ORDINANCE OF THE MAYOR AND TOWN COUNCIL OF
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK REGULATING THE EXTRACTION OF
NATURAL GAS WITHIN THE TOWN OF MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK

Whereas, this Ordinance establishes a Bill of Rights which recognizes and secures the civil and political rights of Mountain Lake Park residents; and

Whereas, this Ordinance then bans the commercial extraction of natural gas within the Town because that extraction violates the civil rights of Mountain Lake Park residents, and because it threatens the health, safety, and welfare of residents and neighborhoods; and

Whereas, this Ordinance removes legal powers and authority from gas extraction corporations within the Town, in recognition that those legal powers are illegitimate and unjust, in that they place the rights of a corporate minority over the rights and political authority of a majority of Town of Mountain Lake Park residents; and

Whereas, this Ordinance shall be known and may be cited as “Town of Mountain Lake Park’s Community Protection from Natural Gas Extraction Ordinance;” and

Whereas, this Ordinance is enacted pursuant to the inherent right of the residents of Town of Mountain Lake Park to govern their own community, including, without limitation, the Declaration of Independence’s declaration that governments are instituted to secure the rights of people, and the Maryland Constitution’s recognition that “all government right issues from the people.”


This is wonderful. Grassroots, direct democracy which takes the power from the fracking corporation (a MINORITY) and gives it back to the MAJORITY - the people who make up the community. Indeed, the powers of these fracking outfits ARE illegitimate and unjust! You go, Maryland!

This is something that I'd personally be willing to work toward introducing in Colorado, as well. Wouldn't that be cool? Halliburton backed down by the people of a small town because Halliburton is a minority.

That will show the Supreme Court and Congress what happens when you make a corporation into a person. Finally, the people are striking back. Best news I've heard in ages!
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Old 08-20-2013, 06:46 AM
 
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So what do people heat their homes with?

It's funny that for 40 years the left has been screaming "We've got to end our foreign dependence on oil and gas!" and now we are doing so it's the worst thing in the world which just proves to me their end game of tyranny and de-industrialization of western society.

So far fracking has been proved to be as safe as any other method of mineral extraction and those trumpeting the destruction of the industry have yet to display many cases where there have been any issues from fracking at all.

I don't consider a couple of bozos on a city council to be "the majority". Who came up with that nonsense? So some ideologues pass a ordinance when perhaps many of those in the community would be open to having a natural gas well. Typical of the tyrannical left and their obsession with controlling other people. What a bunch of halfwits.
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Old 08-20-2013, 01:11 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
So what do people heat their homes with?
Coal. Coal fired power plants release less CO2 into the air than what is given off by the fracking process.

It's funny that for 40 years the left has been screaming "We've got to end our foreign dependence on oil and gas!" and now we are doing so it's the worst thing in the world which just proves to me their end game of tyranny and de-industrialization of western society.

So far fracking has been proved to be as safe as any other method of mineral extraction and those trumpeting the destruction of the industry have yet to display many cases where there have been any issues from fracking at all.

Quote:
I don't consider a couple of bozos on a city council to be "the majority". Who came up with that nonsense? So some ideologues pass a ordinance when perhaps many of those in the community would be open to having a natural gas well. Typical of the tyrannical left and their obsession with controlling other people. What a bunch of halfwits.
How do you think people get on city counsel? They get elected by a vote from the people of that communnity. Your "two bozo's" were the elected representives of 10,000 people.

The people of the community came up with that "nonsence." They circulated petitions and attended town hall meetings - direct, participatory democracy. The bedrock our country was founded on.

Had a majority of voters in the community wanted fracking, they would have voted the ordinances down.

You don't even know how democracy works do you? That is very, very sad. If everyone in the tea party is as ignorant as you are, it's fortunate that the "tyrannical left" is around to protect the Bill of Rights.

You can mock the democratic process if you wish and go work 16 hours a day ay a pay of 25 cents/hr for some megaconclomerate in China. The American people won't. We stand up for our rights under the constitution.

I can mail you a book on civics to read if you wish. Such ignorance about the most basic functions of self-government is appalling. Too damn bad. *shakes head*
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Old 08-20-2013, 03:24 PM
 
9,840 posts, read 20,559,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
Coal. Coal fired power plants release less CO2 into the air than what is given off by the fracking process.

It's funny that for 40 years the left has been screaming "We've got to end our foreign dependence on oil and gas!" and now we are doing so it's the worst thing in the world which just proves to me their end game of tyranny and de-industrialization of western society.

So far fracking has been proved to be as safe as any other method of mineral extraction and those trumpeting the destruction of the industry have yet to display many cases where there have been any issues from fracking at all.

How do you think people get on city counsel? They get elected by a vote from the people of that communnity. Your "two bozo's" were the elected representives of 10,000 people.

The people of the community came up with that "nonsence." They circulated petitions and attended town hall meetings - direct, participatory democracy. The bedrock our country was founded on.

Had a majority of voters in the community wanted fracking, they would have voted the ordinances down.

You don't even know how democracy works do you? That is very, very sad. If everyone in the tea party is as ignorant as you are, it's fortunate that the "tyrannical left" is around to protect the Bill of Rights.

You can mock the democratic process if you wish and go work 16 hours a day ay a pay of 25 cents/hr for some megaconclomerate in China. The American people won't. We stand up for our rights under the constitution.

I can mail you a book on civics to read if you wish. Such ignorance about the most basic functions of self-government is appalling. Too damn bad. *shakes head*
Just because someone gets elected to any government does not entitle them to be God and suddenly start passing all these dictates regulating commerce between private individuals and companies. Who the hell gave them that power?

If you love coal, the obama administration is doing everything it can to shut down the coal business.
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