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Old 10-02-2013, 04:09 PM
 
22,966 posts, read 42,055,677 times
Reputation: 23391

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Seems that deep sediments being brought to the surface and disposed of are raising radiation levels in water back in S.W. Pennsylvania.

Story on Bloomberg today.

Excerpts:

Sediment in Blacklick Creek contained radium in concentrations 200 times above normal, or background levels, according to the study, published today in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. The radium, along with salts such as bromide, came from the Josephine Brine Treatment Facility about 45 miles (72 kilometers) east of Pittsburgh, a plant that treats wastewater from oil and gas drilling.

“The absolute levels that we found are much higher than what you allow in the U.S. for any place to dump radioactive material,” Avner Vengosh, a professor at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University and co-author of the study, said in an interview. “The radium will be bio-accumulating. You eventually could get it in the fish.”
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Old 10-02-2013, 10:06 PM
 
9,840 posts, read 20,492,992 times
Reputation: 7667
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Seems that deep sediments being brought to the surface and disposed of are raising radiation levels in water back in S.W. Pennsylvania.

Story on Bloomberg today.

Excerpts:

Sediment in Blacklick Creek contained radium in concentrations 200 times above normal, or background levels, according to the study, published today in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. The radium, along with salts such as bromide, came from the Josephine Brine Treatment Facility about 45 miles (72 kilometers) east of Pittsburgh, a plant that treats wastewater from oil and gas drilling.

“The absolute levels that we found are much higher than what you allow in the U.S. for any place to dump radioactive material,” Avner Vengosh, a professor at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University and co-author of the study, said in an interview. “The radium will be bio-accumulating. You eventually could get it in the fish.”
Have they proven those levels came exactly from treated fracking wastewater?

I actually know the Black Lick very well because it is in my grandmothers backyard and my uncles life ended on it. It has long been polluted because of coal mine run off. When I was a kid in the 1980's it was completely orange and dead. Nothing grew in it and there were no fish. They have made an effort to clean it up some and the water is more clear these days and looking a lot better.
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Old 10-17-2013, 11:38 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,358,342 times
Reputation: 2633
Wink If in the news

"It took nearly two weeks for officials to tell the public about the massive rupture that occurred in a remote area of Tioga." [1]


As estimated 20,000 plus barrels of crude oil has leaked onto the farm of Steve Jensen. Issuing from a quarter-inch hole in a pipeline under about 100 pounds pressure, the oil had been leaking for some time underground before being detected. Jensen only noticed this when out harvesting durum wheat, with some of the oil bubbling six inches out of the ground.

The Jensen farm is located near Tioga, North Dakota, northeast of Williston, ND, which is the de facto fracking capitol of North Dakota and the upper Midwest. Williston resides on the north bank of the Missouri River. Tioga about 20 miles north of this river, which at that point is one of the key reservoirs in North Dakota, Lake Sakakawea.

The public is routinely not informed of such oil spills. Only if into a river or otherwise noticeable will they customarily be. Oil companies must inform the North Dakota Health Department of oil spills, but that agency considers itself under no obligation to inform the public of same.

1) 'Scientists question 20,000-barrel North Dakota oil spill estimate,' Fox News
Scientists question 20,000-barrel North Dakota oil spill estimate | Fox News
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Old 10-17-2013, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,794 posts, read 17,551,828 times
Reputation: 9424
@Idunn....the state will probably go after Jenson for the clean up costs rather than tangling with a big money oil company having the ability to defeat the state in a court battle. Oil companies can do no wrong. They got the pols on their puppet strings!
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Old 10-17-2013, 03:46 PM
 
9,840 posts, read 20,492,992 times
Reputation: 7667
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
"It took nearly two weeks for officials to tell the public about the massive rupture that occurred in a remote area of Tioga." [1]

As estimated 20,000 plus barrels of crude oil has leaked onto the farm of Steve Jensen. Issuing from a quarter-inch hole in a pipeline under about 100 pounds pressure, the oil had been leaking for some time underground before being detected. Jensen only noticed this when out harvesting durum wheat, with some of the oil bubbling six inches out of the ground.

The Jensen farm is located near Tioga, North Dakota, northeast of Williston, ND, which is the de facto fracking capitol of North Dakota and the upper Midwest. Williston resides on the north bank of the Missouri River. Tioga about 20 miles north of this river, which at that point is one of the key reservoirs in North Dakota, Lake Sakakawea.

The public is routinely not informed of such oil spills. Only if into a river or otherwise noticeable will they customarily be. Oil companies must inform the North Dakota Health Department of oil spills, but that agency considers itself under no obligation to inform the public of same.
1) 'Scientists question 20,000-barrel North Dakota oil spill estimate,' Fox News
Scientists question 20,000-barrel North Dakota oil spill estimate | Fox News
Sounds like this should posted in the North Dakota section of the forum.
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Old 10-18-2013, 11:22 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 6,358,342 times
Reputation: 2633
Wink Au contraire

"Robinson is among many residents who feel there has been a lack of transparency from both state agencies and the company involved — the Williams Co." [1]


Those living near Parachute Creek might disagree that governmental transparency is only an issue for those in North Dakota. As feeling that neither the state of Colorado or the Williams Co. were all that forthcoming or transparent with an oil spill into that watershed. Indeed rather dismissing their concerns over health and environment as a non-issue.

The greater issue of transparency goes far beyond any one individual oil spill. There are presently a number of pro-fracking commercials on television, although I believe the word "fracking" itself is assiduously avoided. These ads are designed to influence, and, no surprise, an election is coming up with a measure that will affect oil companies. Not that they may not exist, but I've yet to see advertisements from proponents of regulation (as likely without near the funding).

Most arguments made on this or other issues are naturally subjective and to one degree or another biased. So one must study and decide for themselves. But money talks in this nation, and it helps not at all when our governmental regulators and the oil industry are essentially in bed together.


1) 'Residents Voice Concerns After Parachute Creek*Leak, CBS 4 Denver
Residents Voice Concerns After Parachute Creek Leak « CBS Denver
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Old 11-01-2013, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,794 posts, read 17,551,828 times
Reputation: 9424
Although this article is about a fracking related situation in Pennsylvania, the same thing is probably happening in Colorado too.
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Centennial State
399 posts, read 735,061 times
Reputation: 176
Anti-fracking measures leading in Lafayette, Boulder, Fort Collins; trailing in Broomfield - Boulder Daily Camera

;D The results are almost completely in.
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Old 11-06-2013, 09:38 AM
 
1,568 posts, read 1,121,291 times
Reputation: 1890
This is a great example for the Keystone pipeline. The pipeline infrastructure is extremely dated and needs to be updated. There is a massive amount of crude coming out of ND and Alberta that needs to be shipped to the gulf and other refineries. These pipes in place are 40 yrs old +. Right now the best option is rail and that's extremely inefficient over those distances. This would generate thousands of blue collar jobs and billions of taxable revenue. It sucks this happened, but no body is going to leave the crude up there, one way or another is will be moved.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
"It took nearly two weeks for officials to tell the public about the massive rupture that occurred in a remote area of Tioga." [1]


As estimated 20,000 plus barrels of crude oil has leaked onto the farm of Steve Jensen. Issuing from a quarter-inch hole in a pipeline under about 100 pounds pressure, the oil had been leaking for some time underground before being detected. Jensen only noticed this when out harvesting durum wheat, with some of the oil bubbling six inches out of the ground.

The Jensen farm is located near Tioga, North Dakota, northeast of Williston, ND, which is the de facto fracking capitol of North Dakota and the upper Midwest. Williston resides on the north bank of the Missouri River. Tioga about 20 miles north of this river, which at that point is one of the key reservoirs in North Dakota, Lake Sakakawea.

The public is routinely not informed of such oil spills. Only if into a river or otherwise noticeable will they customarily be. Oil companies must inform the North Dakota Health Department of oil spills, but that agency considers itself under no obligation to inform the public of same.
1) 'Scientists question 20,000-barrel North Dakota oil spill estimate,' Fox News
Scientists question 20,000-barrel North Dakota oil spill estimate | Fox News
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Old 11-06-2013, 10:29 AM
 
957 posts, read 1,092,714 times
Reputation: 1160
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
This is a great example for the Keystone pipeline. The pipeline infrastructure is extremely dated and needs to be updated. There is a massive amount of crude coming out of ND and Alberta that needs to be shipped to the gulf and other refineries. These pipes in place are 40 yrs old +. Right now the best option is rail and that's extremely inefficient over those distances. This would generate thousands of blue collar jobs and billions of taxable revenue. It sucks this happened, but no body is going to leave the crude up there, one way or another is will be moved.
Meh. Either way, it's going to Asia and the shipping costs would be less with a Pacific terminal versus a Gulf one. I'd rather see a half-dozen LNG export terminals built in the United States versus Keystone.

Last edited by wong21fr; 11-06-2013 at 10:44 AM..
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