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Old 12-14-2010, 07:30 PM
 
13 posts, read 20,886 times
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Hello, im 24 and my gal is 23. We are looking to get out of St. louis, and come to the great CO this summer of 2011! I've been there 3 times and love the place. Not so much denver though. Denver was too city like. We want to be close to some mean mountain bike downhills/trails. Whitewater and some really good hiking and camping. Snowboarding as well. I would like to be 15 minuntes away from the mountainbiking and whitewater. A little further from the hiking and camping would be ok, but if all together, even better. Would also like to be close to the ski resorts. Need a decent size city for job reasons but want that outdoors feeling where we live (not like denver, been there and was not a fan). Loved boulder but its expensive and The more I read, the more bad things I hear, some good, seems more bad than good though. I didnt really notice, but i was only there for a week. Would like that outdoors feeling where we move. Have two dogs, pitbull and bulldog. A house for rent would be nice with a fenced in yard. Can afford about $1200.00 a Month in rent. Let me know if you need any more information. Thanks for your replies!

Last edited by Mike from back east; 12-14-2010 at 08:08 PM.. Reason: Merged 2:1
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Old 12-14-2010, 11:45 PM
 
8,089 posts, read 15,924,428 times
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Your priorities are bass ackwards. You'd better have a job first that will support you, then worry about where to have fun. And, yes, the job market is terrible.
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Old 12-14-2010, 11:47 PM
 
403 posts, read 240,092 times
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I'd suggest my town, but I'm not keen on having more pit bulls here. Sorry. If you rethink the dog, you'll have more options.
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Old 12-15-2010, 01:34 AM
 
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Hi guys.
Jazz lover. As long as I can have a city with a decent population. I can make money. I'm an entrepreneur. So if you have any suggestions please let me know. Mizzle, My dog is a lover.
It's all I how you raise your dog. He also loves the outdoors ( been backpacking with me twice). I can't wait to get him out the great outdoors state.
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Old 12-15-2010, 09:23 AM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
2,143 posts, read 3,025,884 times
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I have a great love and respect for Pits, however the cities of Denver and Aurora (I believe) have bans on them. I don't want to start a debate on Breed Specific Legislation but check out the town regulations before you move there.

I do have to agree that the job outlook is terrible. Plan on moving here with at least 6-9 months of living expenses saved. Even if you are creating your own job, people just don't have as much disposable income and are very frugal as to where they spend it.
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Old 12-15-2010, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
2,845 posts, read 4,669,313 times
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OP, what do you consider to be a "decent size city"? There are various places that you could live in the mountains to be close to the outdoor activities, but the larger cities are going to be Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Boulder and Fort Collins (the Front Range), and Grand Junction on the west side of the state. You said that you are not interested in Denver, but there are communities in the foothills that are outside of the big city feel while still being within commuting distance to Denver, such as Morrison, Evergreen, Conifer.

Do you need a certain population size or demographic for your job?
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Old 12-15-2010, 03:09 PM
 
9,713 posts, read 12,279,030 times
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I wish there was some way of fixing the naivete of people when it comes to Colorado and it's geography.

To have ready access to mountain biking, backpacking, camping, whitewater, snowboarding out your back door from a "city" in Colorado doesn't exist. All the cities in Colorado are on the I-25 corridor with the exception of Grand Junction in far west Colorado. That leaves a few mountain towns and ski towns, all of which have high costs of living and you sure as heck wont be living in a detached house with a fenced in yard for $1200 a month in most of these places.

In addition most of those mountain towns have one or two track economies, either revolving around 2nd home real estate or tourism and mineral extraction. If you are not involved in either industry it is difficult to make a living, plus since these towns are desirable places to live, competition is intense. Most people in these towns have 2 to 3 jobs/businesses to make it. These towns rarely have more than 5000 full time residents as well.

What Coloradoboundboy describes is a world most desire and fantasize about when it comes to Colorado, but the reality and real life is much different. Few can make the long term sacrifices to survive in the mountains. Most last a season or two before reality bites, financially or otherwise. If it was that easy, everyone would be doing it. What CBB will have to do as most others, is compromise on all these dream desires and having been someone that has been there and done it, I think he overestimates his ability to make money in the Colorado Rockies outside of the major Denver Metro area. In addition to make the money to survive and have a good lifestyle you wont be kayaking/biking/skiing/camping all the time. Instead you'll be working 80 hours a week during ski season or the summer when the weather is good.

Not to say it isn't possible but it takes many years of sacrifice to make it in these towns and get ahead.
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Old 12-15-2010, 05:25 PM
 
8,089 posts, read 15,924,428 times
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Exactly right, wanneroo. Unfortunately, a whole lot of 20-somethings who post their little fantasies on this forum have yet get the thorough economic ass-kicking along the way that a lot of us who are a little older and who have lived in the Colorado economy for awhile have gotten to "enjoy" over the years. As I've posted before, Colorado in the 1990's and early 2000's enjoyed, mostly because of the real estate bubble, the most prosperous and expanding economy that it has seen in over a century. Those fun times are OVER, probably for good. Right now, a whole lot of current Coloradans are finding out that holding onto the dream of living in Colorado is getting pretty tenuous, if not impossible.

As an aside, I was in Denver a few days ago. Never in my life--over a half-century worth--have I seen so many homeless people wandering around downtown Denver. Many of them were panhandling to get enough money to get out of town to somewhere--anywhere. It's a very sobering and sad sight, which the local media seems intent on ignoring.
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Old 12-15-2010, 08:57 PM
 
916 posts, read 1,239,222 times
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There are past threads on most larger and medium Colorado cities and many of the towns on the site and usually they will address the availability of outdoor amenities at least briefly. Often they end up being your best resource here but maybe you can pull out more.

Size range of place that you prefer or will even consider is a clue you really need to give though for your best chance at new advice about specific places.

I don't know your size range for places but I'll throw out Canon City, Woodland Park, Durango and Glenwood Springs and see if you have any reaction to them. Maybe Montrose.

Last edited by NW Crow; 12-15-2010 at 09:19 PM..
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Old 12-15-2010, 11:43 PM
 
9,713 posts, read 12,279,030 times
Reputation: 7080
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Exactly right, wanneroo. Unfortunately, a whole lot of 20-somethings who post their little fantasies on this forum have yet get the thorough economic ass-kicking along the way that a lot of us who are a little older and who have lived in the Colorado economy for awhile have gotten to "enjoy" over the years. As I've posted before, Colorado in the 1990's and early 2000's enjoyed, mostly because of the real estate bubble, the most prosperous and expanding economy that it has seen in over a century. Those fun times are OVER, probably for good. Right now, a whole lot of current Coloradans are finding out that holding onto the dream of living in Colorado is getting pretty tenuous, if not impossible.

As an aside, I was in Denver a few days ago. Never in my life--over a half-century worth--have I seen so many homeless people wandering around downtown Denver. Many of them were panhandling to get enough money to get out of town to somewhere--anywhere. It's a very sobering and sad sight, which the local media seems intent on ignoring.
Well i think it is important to point out that it is not impossible, but it is difficult. I knew plenty of people that did all those activities all the time but they were also paycheck to paycheck or worse and some 10 years later are still living with roommates in an apartment. And most lasted a year or two before real world reality set in.

A large chunk of the job market is seasonal type work and since so many people aspire to live there, good full time jobs can take a while to obtain and the job market at that is very narrow. Add in a competitive business environment due to desirability and the small economies in these towns and it is difficult.

All depends what the OP is willing to accept. A lot of the larger towns like Canon City or Glenwood or Grand Junction are shirt tail relatives at best to "real" mountain towns and living in those places will require just as much as a drive to good mountain activities as it would take living in the Front Range Population Blob.

The only real towns with these types of activities 15 minutes away plus that have services and jobs, are ski towns. And one wont be living in a detached home with a yard for $1200 a month near any of those places. You gotta pay to play and there is no shortcut. If there was, everyone else would be doing it.

In regards to the mountain economy, especially that of the real estate business, in my opinion, it's done for 20 years. There will still be business and life in these places, just that there has been a major burst of development and redevelopment in the past 10 years and I think it's enough for the market for now. There are only so many people that can afford a multi million dollar property and Colorado is loaded with them, beyond what I think the market can bear.
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