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Old 08-21-2014, 09:23 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,300 times
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Hey all, I am currently considering a homestead-type project in the San Luis Valley, and I appreciate all of the great information contained in this thread. I still have a lot of questions, specifically about how to find and choose parcels of land. I'm looking at some of the 35-acre parcels in the Ewing Ranch Sub and trying to find out more about water rights and the best price per acre I can expect. I would prefer land in Saguache, Alamosa, and Costilla Counties. Any and all advice is much appreciated.
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Old 08-21-2014, 09:37 PM
 
20,308 posts, read 37,804,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcoddington View Post
Hey all, I am currently considering a homestead-type project in the San Luis Valley, and I appreciate all of the great information contained in this thread. I still have a lot of questions, specifically about how to find and choose parcels of land. I'm looking at some of the 35-acre parcels in the Ewing Ranch Sub and trying to find out more about water rights and the best price per acre I can expect. I would prefer land in Saguache, Alamosa, and Costilla Counties. Any and all advice is much appreciated.
JCod, look at some of our other SLV threads....

- Land in San Luis Valley

- San Luis Valley


There are more, use our advanced search tool....
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Old 08-22-2014, 08:20 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,637 posts, read 8,758,135 times
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Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
What I never understand is for a lot of these people that want to do this sort of thing they often look west and ignore Appalachia from Georgia to Maine. Plenty of water, plenty of timber and plenty easy to grow things and much easier to reach some sort of civilization. And for the most part land is reasonable.
Absolutely. If that's the kind of lifestyle I wanted, I'd pack my wagon and head for the Ohio Valley. Yes, it's muggy and buggy, but the land is cheap, the soil is fertile, and the water is plentiful.
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Old 08-22-2014, 09:10 PM
 
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Thank you!
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Old 08-23-2014, 09:21 AM
 
249 posts, read 264,140 times
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Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
Absolutely. If that's the kind of lifestyle I wanted, I'd pack my wagon and head for the Ohio Valley. Yes, it's muggy and buggy, but the land is cheap, the soil is fertile, and the water is plentiful.
that's kinda of my problem, deep, dark, bug infested forests are simply unappealing. Wide open western land on the other hand is just so inspiring and cool
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Old 08-23-2014, 09:49 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,637 posts, read 8,758,135 times
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Originally Posted by skytop View Post
that's kinda of my problem, deep, dark, bug infested forests are simply unappealing. Wide open western land on the other hand is just so inspiring and cool
I completely understand. I'm partial to the wide open spaces and low humidity myself, but I was just pointing out that trying to live on the land in the San Luis Valley is much more challenging than creating a similar homestead in the Central & Upper Midwest. It makes me sad to see such a beautiful and fertile part of the country overlooked. Ohio, Indiana, Western Pennsylvania, Michigan & Northern Kentucky have a lot to offer.
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Old 08-23-2014, 12:55 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,838,130 times
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Wink With water

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcoddington View Post
Hey all, I am currently considering a homestead-type project in the San Luis Valley, and I appreciate all of the great information contained in this thread. I still have a lot of questions, specifically about how to find and choose parcels of land. I'm looking at some of the 35-acre parcels in the Ewing Ranch Sub and trying to find out more about water rights and the best price per acre I can expect. I would prefer land in Saguache, Alamosa, and Costilla Counties. Any and all advice is much appreciated.


'Some exempt wells are further limited to in-house use only when lot sizes are smaller than 35 acres.' [1]


Water. In considering location and acreage, look to water rights first. As to whether there is any water physically to be had. As well one's legal right to it, or not. This will depend in part on whether establishing a new water well, or using a source existing. Either way, be sure of legal access to adequate water in advance.

Either one of these three counties—Alamosa, Costilla, Saguache—can place one out in the midst of the quite large and potentially very dry San Luis Valley, naturally vegetated with sagebrush and not much else. Or alternately next to or within the mountains. The difference obviously affecting many aspects of one's existence. And, again, potentially access to water. Also services, as one could potentially be close to the largest market in the valley with Alamosa. Or, way out and beyond, with maybe the closest town Saguache, having a certain charm but limited services (and a long drive to anywhere else). So that.

The asking price of some property in the region can look attractive. On the ground the realities involved may dissuade some. Those still interested may wish to closely consider the details. Like water.


1) 'Private Wells for Home Use, Colorado State University
Private Wells for Home Use
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Old 08-23-2014, 02:40 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,103,855 times
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The one thing that people just can't seem to get: In today's overcrowded, overpopulated America, if there is a place that is sparsely populated, there is usually a VERY GOOD reason (or many reasons) that it is that way. The SLV is a prime example. It has essentially two industries that support what economy there is there--agriculture and some summer tourism. Agriculture is in trouble in the SLV because nearly a quarter of the irrigated land in the valley will have to be dried up in order to satisfy downstream water compacts that Colorado has with New Mexico and Texas. Summer tourism there is not a big enough industry to support a lot of people and never will be. No surprise then that most kids who grow up in the SLV have to leave in order to make a living. Then, too, there are the brutally cold winters that are more than most people are willing to endure. Make no mistake, I like the SLV very much and some of the best people that I know live there, but it is an extremely difficult place in which to live and most people don't have what it takes to be able to live there successfully for very long, if at all.
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Old 08-24-2014, 12:56 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,023,867 times
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Originally Posted by skytop View Post
that's kinda of my problem, deep, dark, bug infested forests are simply unappealing. Wide open western land on the other hand is just so inspiring and cool
Yeah but if you don't have any water to run your organic fair trade earth loving hobby farm, inspiring and cool only get you so far.
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Old 08-24-2014, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,455,342 times
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skytop wrote: Wide open western land on the other hand is just so inspiring and cool

Cool for 2 weeks in the spring, and cool for 2 weeks in the fall, then ass freezing cold for 6 months in the winter, and bake oven hot for 5 months in the summer.
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