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Old 09-10-2013, 12:05 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,954,423 times
Reputation: 9432

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
I've been telling you for years that if you are going to do it, do it now and move there otherwise it will never happen. Once people get up to 70 years old and start needing assistance with things, medical care or other issues, living out in the boonies up in a high elevation area with lots of winter weather, it starts to become real tough.
I can still kill chipmunks with my walker at 10,000 ft, sonny!
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Old 09-10-2013, 12:21 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,838,130 times
Reputation: 2615
Wink Remote realities

Quote:
Originally Posted by debbie at bouontiful View Post
I here you wanneroo. What I wonder is say take the Village of Chama, how to the locals live without medical. I can live with driving to Santa Fe for routine stuff, dental too but emergencies is another thing. Last year I talked to a guy, same guy each year, that owns a shop there and he had a heart attack. He said the whole Village was in action getting him to a hospital.


If one is truly concerned with such things they live in town, one with a decent hospital, and know where it is.

Farther out, one is taking their chances. The heart attack or other ailment that one might survive in town could see one dead from the exact same circumstances thirty minutes out. And many locations, and residences, are farther removed than that.

There is a price in all things.
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: OKLAHOMA
1,778 posts, read 3,480,623 times
Reputation: 927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
If one is truly concerned with such things they live in town, one with a decent hospital, and know where it is.

Farther out, one is taking their chances. The heart attack or other ailment that one might survive in town could see one dead from the exact same circumstances thirty minutes out. And many locations, and residences, are farther removed than that.

There is a price in all things.


Obviously not bothering me too much but it is a consideration.
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Old 09-10-2013, 06:59 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,954,423 times
Reputation: 9432
Quote:
Originally Posted by debbie at bouontiful View Post
I am a little bit more understanding about medical. I know the area explorer-traveler lived and it is beautiful. We keep wanting to retire in another area similar (Chama, NM). They have one doctor once in awhile otherwise you drive a couple hours. Well, we at present live 30 minutes to the closest hospital/doctor/medical of any kind. A ranch in Eastern OK. My husband came down with West Nile at 10:00 at night and without emergency vehicle here we made it to the hospital. He is fine but had it been much longer with such a high temp am not sure. So I am considering medical for the first time in my life. Never needed emergency help before and hopefully never again. But..you can't live in the city waiting for an emergency and miss the great outdoors either.

I hope exployer-traveler gives a little more information too.
Here's my take on that from a post I made on much the same subject in a different forum:

I continue to think about the urban vs rural thing. Urban is VERY hard to choke down. Yesterday I was back up in my beloved San Juans, as usual. I'd turned off the main highway on a whim, figuring that I'd take the long way home. Since my sudden trip through the back country had been taken on impulse, I didn't have my maps or GPS with me, and if I spied someone coming over the mountains, I had to wave them down and question them about the road ahead - something I hardly ever do.

It was a great experience, and I've decided that I need to stop fellow mountain lovers in Colorado for directions more often. People on the lonely back country roads in our state's wonderful mountains are some of the friendliest people around. I had stopped at a cross road, trying to decide between one of two forest service roads when an ancient Willy's crested the hill on one of them. I haven't seen a Willy's in a coon's age, and this one was pretty old, and someone had cut off the top with a blow torch to turn it into a Willy's convertable. Heh!

The 4 people in that old Willy's jeep were around their late 70's, and those folks were having a BLAST exploring the San Juans. They explained that they moved from Durango to a small town in Wyoming because Durango had gotten too big for them (it's too big for me, too), but they still loved the San Juans and came back every summer.

I asked them how they liked living in Wyoming and they told me that they loved it, boasting that their nearest neighbor was a good 20 miles from their place. They were TENT camping - no Winnebego for them! They looked fit and rosy cheeked and couldn't wait to drive their old Willy's over the next mountain pass. I was in awe.

Of course those folks had money - I could tell from the way they described their Wyoming home. They had won the health lottery - no obvious disability (course mine's not apparent either) and lucked out with good genes - but also had an outdoors Western life-style that kept them trim and their hearts in good shape. I'd really miss this last one if I lived in some big town - I'm not much of a fitness club, take walks on the concrete pathways type.

I imagine that many retirees with NO disability would have advised that gang of Western desparados to never have moved to some place 40 miles away from the nearest SMALL town, never mind urban area. Sure, those folks were taking a gamble. What about a stroke/heart attack/broken hip - especially at THEIR age? Me, if those guys had invited me to join the gang, hop in the Willy's and join them in rural Wyoming, I'd have signed up in a minute! I take my chances, and that would be a worthwhile chance for someone like me to take:

urban life-no mountains-traffic-crummy urban low income housing-hours and hours stuck in traffic and waiting in and line then at the end have a stroke and end up drooling for 3 years in medicaid funded waiting to die facility before heading off for the great whatever at age 85 OR:

rural life-mountain rambling-walking alone safely down the middle of Main Street at 3am-crummy rural low income housing (low income housing is ALWAYS crummy, I have discovered) getting eaten by a cougar while standing on a mountain top at age 75.

I pick the cougar.
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Old 09-11-2013, 09:30 AM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,023,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
urban life-no mountains-traffic-crummy urban low income housing-hours and hours stuck in traffic and waiting in and line then at the end have a stroke and end up drooling for 3 years in medicaid funded waiting to die facility before heading off for the great whatever at age 85 OR:

rural life-mountain rambling-walking alone safely down the middle of Main Street at 3am-crummy rural low income housing (low income housing is ALWAYS crummy, I have discovered) getting eaten by a cougar while standing on a mountain top at age 75.

I pick the cougar.
OK you first.

My relatives in Colorado have lived long lives, my grandmother is still out there hiking at 80 for instance, but is starting to struggle.

But time does catch up to you, catches up to all of us and at some point it's just not feasible to live that far out in the boonies without assistance. Unless someone says that they can't hack it and decide to skydive off of a cliff, some decisions and circumstances decide things for you.
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Old 09-11-2013, 03:24 PM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,253 posts, read 3,954,423 times
Reputation: 9432
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
OK you first.
You bet! And no cutting in line.

Quote:
My relatives in Colorado have lived long lives, my grandmother is still out there hiking at 80 for instance, but is starting to struggle.

But time does catch up to you, catches up to all of us and at some point it's just not feasible to live that far out in the boonies without assistance. Unless someone says that they can't hack it and decide to skydive off of a cliff, some decisions and circumstances decide things for you.
Time gets us all in the end, and in the long run, we're all dead. I'll take quality over quantity, thank you very much. Maybe my outlook will change - it probably will - but right now I'm not especially ancient, and to tell the truth, don't have a walker to kill chipmunks with.

When I was a kid there were still horned toads for quick little fingers to catch - out on the vast prairie east of the small town of Colorado Springs. I was fascinated by those critters. I loved their camo-colors that allowed them to blend in with the ground. I loved that they had "horns." I was terrorizer in chief of those poor old creatures, and I was always catching one to bring to his new home in a shoe box with holes punched in the top. But those horned toads refused to eat. I tried to entice them with house flies, a plethora of insects caught in the prairie which began outside my house, earthworms even. They refused to eat in my captivity. I'd spend two or three days trying to tempt their appetites until finally I got scared my new pet would die, so I'd take it back where it belonged and let it go.

I suspect that if I were forced into a nursing home or whatever, my fate would be the same as that of those horned toads. I wouldn't last long.
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Old 09-13-2013, 02:32 AM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,483,936 times
Reputation: 18836
Between utter wildness and urban ugh, there's a lot of space and options, everywhere except jam-packed suburbia. I hope to find some kind of compromise, although am not currently overly urban where I am, it is a town that bordes a metro area, but is still a town. I think I'm a town person, maybe edge-of-town.
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Old 09-20-2013, 04:03 PM
 
6 posts, read 17,789 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
May I ask why you left? (Loved your description of life there). I'm guess that, if you went there as retirees, there were health issues some five years later? Did you consider that? I realize that you moved there without a place "to go back to" due to the floods. Did you expect to stay there "forever?" I can see the seduction of it- a view of the San Juans every day. Mmmm.
Actually it wasn't really my idea to move. I got kind of guilt ed into it because my wife missed her home state (especially ) New Orleans although I would not have moved back to N.O...the city was a wreck and
it was total chaos and some parts still are. We didn't live in the flooded areas but it broke our hearts to see the destruction on the old homes there .We lived on the west bank and had very little water damage but wind damage yes but our homes were fixable and as a matter of fact we fixed our home and sold it within a month. So it wasn't too bad but after two months of being out of the city and coming back to pick up the pieces ,it was very limited on stores and places to obtain goods and the city was an absolute mess.

So I gave in to my wife and we moved back to the north part of Louisiana and it is pretty nice but we are in the process of moving again after four years to another exotic location ,cold and so different and beautiful. so with that being said.. no health issues with the valley or anything like that. When we first moved to the valley... yes we did expect to stay but ,as I said my wife missed our home state and I always love to travel and explore and again we decided it was time for a change..so we are at it again.

Last edited by Mike from back east; 11-20-2014 at 11:05 AM.. Reason: Advertising is not allowed in this forum.
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Old 09-20-2013, 04:09 PM
 
6 posts, read 17,789 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by debbie at bouontiful View Post
I am a little bit more understanding about medical. I know the area explorer-traveler lived and it is beautiful. We keep wanting to retire in another area similar (Chama, NM). They have one doctor once in awhile otherwise you drive a couple hours. Well, we at present live 30 minutes to the closest hospital/doctor/medical of any kind. A ranch in Eastern OK. My husband came down with West Nile at 10:00 at night and without emergency vehicle here we made it to the hospital. He is fine but had it been much longer with such a high temp am not sure. So I am considering medical for the first time in my life. Never needed emergency help before and hopefully never again. But..you can't live in the city waiting for an emergency and miss the great outdoors either.

I hope exployer-traveler gives a little more information too.
The health care facilities there are great. We lived between Del Norte which has a medical center
and Alamosa which has a great hospital and very adaquate health facities also Monte has several nice
doctors offices ..so health there wasn't an issue..We lived at 8500 ft coming from below sea level and never had any issues except for very minor at first visit as I described. As I saying if you have any questions what so ever i will be glad to give an unbiased answer..anytime
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Old 10-09-2013, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Indiana
2 posts, read 3,832 times
Reputation: 14
Wow, read all nine pages of posts and they are all over the chart on feelings on the SLV area. I purchased a five acre tract near Blanca and just went out for a visit and camping trip. The drive from Indiana was worth every minute. The first night we were there, setting around the camp stove listening to the coyotes and looking up at a night sky I have never seen before. Unable to describe the beauty of it in words.

We did a little exploring while there, Blanca, Alamosa, the pool at the Sand Dunes RV park (worth the money!) and just hacking around for a few days. People were friendly to us, I guess the tourist business is large enough that we didn't even get the usual "where are you from" questions.

Two things made me sad, leaving for sure and True Grits Steakhouse. Food was mediocre and expensive, the service was friendly and that is about it. Nothing outstanding. The Cafe' in Blanca was far and away better.

I was looking for someplace to get away, I found it. Hope to spend more time out there soon. Few more years before I can get away for good, will it be SLV ? I don't know, but I do know it is beautiful country and I can't wait to get back for another stay.
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