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Old 01-23-2011, 06:46 PM
 
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James was looking for previous reassurance on here before about this.

No matter where you are in Colorado, you will not escape winter. You will have lots of wind, cold, sub zero temps, snow, even in Canon City. I've been thru Canon City tons of times throughout my life in the winter and it is no "banana belt", in fact I have froze my butt off tons of times in the Pueblo and Canon City area in the winter. You might make off with drier snow and drier air, but you will not escape winter and cold temps.

I'd say if it's a concern, rent an apartment in Canon City for the winter and enjoy. You'll find out yourself free of any sunshine pumping looking for real estate marks to buy "dream" real estate.
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Old 01-24-2011, 01:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I remember some Ill. storms, too. Not '67; I wasn't there yet. Champaign's winters are not as severe as Chicago's, which I believe you are referring to, but they're bad enough. I was a visiting nurse in Champaign in the late 70s and remember many winters with snow on the ground for months. I remember one year the legendary weather man in Champaign, Mr. Roberts, said we wouldn't have a "bad" winter b/c we'd just had two in a row and there had never, in the history of Champaign, been three bad winters in a row. Guess what? We got another one! I believe that was 79-80.

Anyway, living first in Denver, the city; and later in Louisville, we learned some of those same things you learned. Our driveway in Denver faced north and had to be shoveled a few times, but our driveways in the two houses we've owned in Louisville face south and we rarely shovel. Frankly, I can't remember any really "bad" winters here, and I've been here 30 years.
I think you were lucky enough to be just out of the reach of the lake effect, but bitter cold was everywhere in IL.....

I don't miss the constant gloominess of clouds that sat over our IL area, or the humidity that stifled us in the summers.....I'd take CO weather, of any kind, over IL in a heartbeat......Even if it does change 6 times in one day, LOL, in fact that's what keeps it interesting.....gotta love the freak hail storms on I-25 between Denver and Fort Collins in June, or snow in the mountains on 4th of July, the rainstorms that hit every afternoon practically at the same times, and the 70 degree days in "winter"......

If you really don't want to deal with snow, or seldom want to deal with snow, head for central Nevada ~ most of the time their weather is "one speed": sunny and warm......
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Old 01-24-2011, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by naturegirll View Post
I think you were lucky enough to be just out of the reach of the lake effect, but bitter cold was everywhere in IL.....

I don't miss the constant gloominess of clouds that sat over our IL area, or the humidity that stifled us in the summers.....I'd take CO weather, of any kind, over IL in a heartbeat......Even if it does change 6 times in one day, LOL, in fact that's what keeps it interesting.....gotta love the freak hail storms on I-25 between Denver and Fort Collins in June, or snow in the mountains on 4th of July, the rainstorms that hit every afternoon practically at the same times, and the 70 degree days in "winter"......

If you really don't want to deal with snow, or seldom want to deal with snow, head for central Nevada ~ most of the time their weather is "one speed": sunny and warm......
70 degree days in winter is something you don't see in Ill, not even in Champaign. I like to say it can be 70 on New Year's Day here, and 70 on the 4th of July.
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Old 01-24-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
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Originally Posted by james57 View Post
I have long considered relocation to the so called banana belt of Colorado. Specifically the Canon City general area. One of my considerations is the weather , especially winter weather.

I'm sure the locals will recall their experiences of the worst winter or winters in living memory. I live in Illinois so know what the worst winter is like here. Before any relocation to Colorado I just want to be sure I'm not getting myself into worse winter weather.

As a note, I have watched the weather this winter here in Illinois and also in Canon City. So far, Canon City seems to have had a mild winter. Much worse here in Illinois for both snow and cold. But that is only one winter. So a knowledge of what can be the worst winter weather is nice to have before a relocation.

So I would appreciate any comments from the locals. Specifically winters with heavy snow and long lasting snow on the ground along with sub zero temps for prolonged periods. We get that type weather here in Illinois quite a bit. Does it occur in Canon City and surrounding banana belt areas?? Thanks much for any info.

Jim
Worst case scenario, based on Denver (probably applies to Canon City as well). Blizzard, two to three feet of snow, taking over two months to completely melt. City government with inadequate resources and no plans for dealing with the situation. Roads (even major streets) impassible and most all transportation shut down for as long as one week.

The good news, thats not normal weather for Colorado. Unfortunately though, weather is not always normal.

So yeah, Colorado gets a lot of snow. If you can't deal with snow, and the possibility of being snowbound once in a while, you might be better off someplace a bit farther South, like maybe New Mexico.



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Old 01-24-2011, 11:06 AM
 
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Cañon City rarely gets snow that lasts. Its location assures that it will get Chinook winds on a regular basis that live up to their name "Snow Eater." That said, anyplace along the Front Range can get singular big dumps of snow--though those are actually more common from mid-February through April. Typically, the Front Range gets hit the hardest when a "Trinidad Low" (named for Trinidad on the Colorado/New Mexico border) scoots eastward along the Colorado/New Mexico border. The counter-clockwise rotation of the low can fetch moisture from both the Gulf of California and Gulf of Mexico as it moves east and then slams that moisture against the Front Range. If that collides with cold air moving down from the north, the stage is set for a major snow event and/or blizzard along the Front Range, even including locales like Cañon City.

The key thing to remember is that severe weather events that affect one part of Colorado will often leave other parts of the state unscathed. As an example, years ago, during the particularly brutal winter of 1973-74 on the Western Slope, I flew from Denver to Gunnison. High pressure was firmly seated over western Colorado, which creates an inversion in the valleys that caused cold air to pool in them for days or weeks at a time. The same high pressure system increases Chinook warming winds east of the Continental Divide. So, when I left Denver, it was a windy 60° F.; when I landed in Gunnison 40 minutes later, the weather was clear and wind-less, with an ambient temperature of around -25° F.--yes, that's 25 below zero. Two places, 200 miles apart and 85 degrees difference in ambient temperature. By the way, during that winter, the temperature did not get above 0° F. in Gunnison for a month.

Anyone alive then and living in Colorado (my parents were) remember the infamous plains blizzards and brutal cold of 1948-49 that culminated in probably the most widespread severe winter weather event in the state's history with the blizzards near the end of January 1949. The winter of 1899 was one of the most savage in Colorado history--interestingly following several years of mild winters and drought. 1973-74 and 1978-79 were quite brutal with both snow and cold in western Colorado. One of the coldest cold snaps occurred in late January 1951, when a lot of records were shattered. A lot of those records were broken in February 1985, when temperatures dropped below -50° F. in numerous locales. Maybell, near Craig, recorded -65° F. which stands as Colorado's low temperature record, eclipsing the earlier record cold at Taylor Park reservoir northeast of Gunnison. My personally-experienced ambient outside temperature range in Colorado goes from -55° F. at the lowest to 108° F. at the highest--those two extreme numbers experienced in two communities only 90 miles apart.

Comparing with Illinois, most of the lower elevation areas of Colorado would likely be comparable in temperatures (certainly NOT in precipitation) with the southern third of Illinois. Northern Illinois would be colder (with the higher humidity increasing the discomfort) on average. The big difference (other than total yearly precipitation) is that Colorado weather can tend to be much more capricious and variable. That can actually be uncomfortable for some people. 60° F. above zero to below zero over a couple of days time is not unusual in Colorado--especially along the Front Range.

Last edited by jazzlover; 01-24-2011 at 11:29 AM..
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Old 01-24-2011, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Average temps for Champaign, IL January:

History : Weather Underground

Denver in January:

History : Weather Underground

As you can see, Denver is about 10 degrees warmer during the day, roughly the same at night. I don't have snow data, but we usually got at least one blizzard every winter. A blizzard there can be 6" but with heavy winds and drifting, and freakishly cold weather the next few days, as opposed to here where the next few days are usually warm and sunny.
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Old 01-24-2011, 11:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Average temps for Champaign, IL January:

History : Weather Underground

Denver in January:

History : Weather Underground

As you can see, Denver is about 10 degrees warmer during the day, roughly the same at night. I don't have snow data, but we usually got at least one blizzard every winter. A blizzard there can be 6" but with heavy winds and drifting, and freakishly cold weather the next few days, as opposed to here where the next few days are usually warm and sunny.
Almost noplace in Illinois gets more than about 30-35" of snow on average in winter. The southern third of Illinois generally gets around 20" or so, most of which does not stay on the ground for long. In the northern half to two-thirds of Illinois, snowcover on the ground for some period of time in winter is much more common. Cañon City, by contrast, gets around 32" of snow in a typical winter, but most of that wouldn't be on the ground for more than a few days.
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Old 01-24-2011, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Almost noplace in Illinois gets more than about 30-35" of snow on average in winter. The southern third of Illinois generally gets around 20" or so, most of which does not stay on the ground for long. In the northern half to two-thirds of Illinois, snowcover on the ground for some period of time in winter is much more common. Cañon City, by contrast, gets around 32" of snow in a typical winter, but most of that wouldn't be on the ground for more than a few days.
May I ask, have you lived in Ill? It stays on the ground a while in Champaign, by a while I mean months sometimes. It does sometimes warm up in late Feb. there.
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Old 01-24-2011, 03:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
May I ask, have you lived in Ill? It stays on the ground a while in Champaign, by a while I mean months sometimes. It does sometimes warm up in late Feb. there.
I have not lived in Illinois. I consider Champaign to be more central Illinois than southern. Not as rigorous as places like Rockford or Chicago in winter, but not as mild as the southern areas of Illinois. There is a great climate center at the university in Champaign, and I've dealt with some of the climatologists there--back when I was doing some research as an amateur climatologist, specifically on the thunderstorm frequency. They were nice folks to deal with--scary smart, too.
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Old 01-24-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,119 posts, read 99,277,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I have not lived in Illinois. I consider Champaign to be more central Illinois than southern. Not as rigorous as places like Rockford or Chicago in winter, but not as mild as the southern areas of Illinois. There is a great climate center at the university in Champaign, and I've dealt with some of the climatologists there--back when I was doing some research as an amateur climatologist, specifically on the thunderstorm frequency. They were nice folks to deal with--scary smart, too.
Well, I thought I made it clear I was talking about Champaign. Illinois is big state N to S; ~ 400 miles, so yes, climate is different in different parts. I can remember going to Chicago once in March and seeing snow on the ground, which we didn't have in Champaign (that year at that point in time). As for scary smart, as my DH's grad school advisor said, it's so boring out there on the prairie that it's more incentive to devote oneself to one's work.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 01-24-2011 at 04:09 PM..
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