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Old 02-25-2011, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,888 posts, read 8,867,123 times
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I don't really understand the sprawl issue to begin with. I know of no real population center that doesn't have sprawl. Go in any direction around Colorado Springs, and within a very short time you'll find lots of open space.
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Old 02-25-2011, 12:45 PM
 
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I would seriously look into Colorado Springs and points south such as Canon City/Florence or Pueblo. The front range inversions, such as they are, usually affect only Metro Denver and points north. Although Denver pollution can leak over the top of the Palmer Divide, it usually doesn't.

Colorado Springs does have its own sources of pollution and its own occasional inversions, but they are relatively minor.
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:11 PM
 
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Wink Regional differences

It seems your interest is centered in Utah, but since we are discussing that here, might as well. Would mention in relation to Colorado, however, that as far as religion is concerned that Colorado Springs might suit you. Probably not much in the way of Catholicism, but it is one of the more conservative towns in Colorado, if diverse and secular, and definitely Christian.

Utah of course is primarily Mormon. They seem to have a live and let live attitude when it comes to other faiths, but it influences most everything in the state. One reason why it is such an ordered place. But people of other faiths have mentioned on moving there that while people are friendly, that immersion into their inner society only goes so far if one is not Mormon. Something to consider if one is really social.

I have no idea how long weather inversions last in Utah, although suspecting periods of several days at a time spaced throughout the winter. That of Logan, for good or ill, surely different than other front range towns, say Ogden south through Provo, due its separate geography. It is within more of a wide valley, which theoretically could prove even worse, but is distinctly removed from all those other towns, so probably not influenced by what they may output. In this respect, in addition to any local advice you may receive, you might contact Utah State University there, as surely those resident who could tell you more about the climate than you'd ever want to know.

Speaking of USU, it has a pleasant campus in a nice location, and probably a fairly good academic program as well. It would be one of the major influences that could make Logan a good choice of home. If it turns out the weather is acceptable, then Logan offers a lot of advantages. It really does seem a nice town, of modest but adequate size, with ready access to the great outdoors. One downside, which may not affect you, would be its relative isolation, which would render commute to any job not within town problematic. It enjoys a nice setting and, as mentioned previously, no small thing in the arid West that it enjoys a relative abundance of water with rivers flowing in from the north and east. Certainly worth a first-hand look, if at all interested.

Cedar City, UT also has a college, and some of the same ambience of Logan. Its climate is somewhat different, but not as dissimilar from other front range towns, although it is separate and distinctly removed, than that of the closest town of any size to the south, St. George. At an appreciably lower elevation, St. George has a much different climate, quite a bit warmer and drier, more so desert. Also a strong presence of LDS, as towns in Utah will vary in this regard.

Which, in returning to Colorado, suggests every town will be a little different. They certainly are within the Colorado front range.
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Old 02-26-2011, 09:50 AM
 
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Thanks to all for your info (and to Phetaroi...not used to much sprawl here in Michigan..maybe Detroit area..never lived there...fyi, over 800,000 people have moved OUT of this state in the past decade due to economy ....so sprawl ain't happenin' here).

Anyway, I did do a lot of research on the inversion (actually some students from Michigan State University teamed up with others and did a yr-long study regarding the inversions..and it IS a deal breaker. I need to get out each and every day for fresh air and exercise and even more so since I had my double breast-masectomy due to cancer this past November. I must have fresh air..can handle the cold, snow, ice and many gray days but lingering and pervasive pollution is a no-go.

Also, perhaps our being devout Catholic Conservatives is something more to think about.

We have moved on in our search and my daughter told me about an area that I NEVER would have considered otherwise!

Thanks again to ALL for your info ************************************************** ************************

Last edited by Mike from back east; 02-26-2011 at 10:06 AM..
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Old 12-17-2011, 12:44 PM
 
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Default Only if you like to breath or be outdoors...ever.

Only if you like to breath or be outdoors...ever.
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,409 posts, read 2,252,996 times
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There are inversions and then there are INVERSIONS. The Front Range does sometimes get the former (where pollutants are trapped close to the ground but it is still sunny and colder then normal) but they don't usually last long. On the Wasatch Front, however, they get periods in the winter where fog and pollutants combine (I think they have a special term for this in southern California). To me the first it is not bad but the second would be hard to take if it went on for too long. I'm not sure about western CO - my impression is that inversions there often trap cold air in the western valleys for relatively long periods of time but that the weather tends to be sunny during those periods (correct me if I'm wrong western slopers).
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:37 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xeric View Post
There are inversions and then there are INVERSIONS. The Front Range does sometimes get the former (where pollutants are trapped close to the ground but it is still sunny and colder then normal) but they don't usually last long. On the Wasatch Front, however, they get periods in the winter where fog and pollutants combine (I think they have a special term for this in southern California). To me the first it is not bad but the second would be hard to take if it went on for too long. I'm not sure about western CO - my impression is that inversions there often trap cold air in the western valleys for relatively long periods of time but that the weather tends to be sunny during those periods (correct me if I'm wrong western slopers).
The inversions in western Colorado are climatically fairly similar to the inversions on the Wasatch Front--both are caused when a stable high pressure system traps colder air near the ground underneath a warmer upper layer. The major difference is that the Wasatch Front also has two major bodies of water nearby--the Great Salt Lake and Utah Lake--which can add moisture for fog to the mix. Also, the Wasatch Front is a major population center with large numbers of both stationary and mobile air pollution sources. The growth-loving morons in Colorado can't seem to figure out that, were Colorado's western valleys to attain population concentrations similar to the Wasatch Front, it would have air pollution problems just like the Wasatch Front suffers.

As for Colorado's Front Range, it is hardly exempt from serious air pollution problems. The only thing that ameliorated those problems for awhile was the implementation of stringent auto emission standards and the fact that Colorado chased a lot of its heavy industry (which did contribute a fair amount of stationary-source air pollution) out of the state in the last 30 years or so. Out-of-control population growth and sprawl is now overwhelming those pollution reductions and the Front Range is headed to fall out compliance with the Clean Air standards within a few years. The Front Range's air quality was really "sick" (and sickening) back in the late 1960's and 1970's. At least then, though, there was some heavy industry with decent-paying blue-collar jobs to show for it then. No more.
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Old 12-18-2011, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 318,224 times
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"We have moved on in our search and my daughter told me about an area that I NEVER would have considered otherwise!"

You're not gonna leave us hanging, are you? Where?
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Old 12-19-2011, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
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I live in Grand Junction - Co on the western slope of Colorado just 25 miles from the Utah state line. In a typical winter, the Grand Valley gets stuck with inversions several times a winter. They usually endure for 5 to 10 days, with ocassional inversions lasting a month at a time. During an inversion, the overnites get into the single digits ( sometimes below zero ) with day times highs in the mid 20s. The air gets rather foul and mandatory burn restrictions are set in place. The one saving grace about the inversions...NO WIND, so it often FEELS warmer than a windy winter day with temperatures 10 or 15 degrees higher. Although I hate the dam inversions, it's not a deal breaker for me.
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Old 12-19-2011, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,901,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Pam View Post
Thanks all for the info..but just HOW long do these inversions typically last??...3 days?...2 wks?..just an average. I have dug deeper into researching these inversions (had never heard of them before, being from Michigan). '
Inversions are a common thing throughout the southwest. Anybody's who lived in those states is familiar with them. THey'll last until the weather pattern changes and blows them away, usually not more than a couple weeks.
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