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Old 01-09-2009, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,180 posts, read 21,025,157 times
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I am now going to focus on the Rocky Mountain Steel Mill in Pueblo. It was one of Pueblo's primary employers for years and gave Pueblo its nick name of the steel city. It is now owned by a Russian company but continues to be a major part of Pueblo's business portfolio.

This was the main offices used by CF&I and was built in the late 1800's, it is now a museum for the Bessemer historical society.
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Old 01-09-2009, 08:44 PM
 
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What does the company produce today and for whom? Any ideas as to if they see expansion in the future or if they are looking to further idle down?
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Old 01-09-2009, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,180 posts, read 21,025,157 times
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Today they produce tubeing and rail. In fact they are the expanding so they can produce rail that is 300 feet long, it will be the only place in America able to produce rail that long. They just got permission from the court, with the EPA agrement, to exceed the limits placed on production for 2009 as the demand is higher.

It will never be like back in its glory days but in a way thats better for Pueblo. Its now "clean" industry and that is why you see other companies moving in that avoided that area before.
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,180 posts, read 21,025,157 times
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Default Rocky Mountain steel Mill





More Pictures of the Rocky Mountain steel Mill in Pueblo. There are more shots I want to get so look for more in the next few days.....
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Old 01-10-2009, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
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This was built when they first had the highway and was a way for workers to walk under the interstate to the steel mill from the main office.
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Old 01-29-2009, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,180 posts, read 21,025,157 times
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Default Steelmakers get boost in House plan

This was in today's Pueblo Chieftain great news for the steel city!

"The $819 billion stimulus package that House lawmakers approved Wednesday has a key provision for U.S. steelmakers, requiring that all the steel used in the federally subsidized road and construction projects be made in the United States."

"While Evraz Rocky Mountain Steel Mills in Pueblo is Russian-owned, it fits under the House amendment, which says all the iron and steel used in the infrastructure projects must be produced in the U.S."


The link:

http://www.chieftain.com/articles/2009/01/29/news/local/doc4981641bce26e030477745.txt
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Old 02-08-2010, 08:50 PM
 
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I worked on a pipeline that ran from 30 miles nw of Walsenberg to near the Texas border. A number of the laborers hired on came out of the Pueblo union hall, and I got to know a lot of them. Most, if not all of them had lived in the area all their lives and a number of them worked at C,F and I. This was '82, and early 83. A number of them had relatives who had worked at the plant for decades. I befriended a number of these laborers and still visit a couple of them to this day.

It depressed the hell out of them when the layoffs and eventual closing kicked in aound 1984. Colorado was just getting into a recession that racked certain areas of the state for double digit unemployment that hung in the over the area like a weather inversion. Unemployment hit 15% in the area for a time, stayed in double digit figures for a long, long time.

But those friends of mine stayed in the area, leaving was not an option. They know adversity, trust me. This depression, er, recession we are in now is nothing new to those Pueblo people. Pueblo has problems, a lot of problems. But they lifted themselves up by their bootstraps, like Paul Harvey said (I remember when he said that as well!) They rolled up their sleeves and went to work, as blue collar workers do. It doesn't get any more blue collar than Pueblo. But they have a ways to go.

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 02-09-2010 at 05:14 PM..
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Old 02-08-2010, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,180 posts, read 21,025,157 times
Reputation: 4259
That is a great post and explains Pueblo's economic situation in the 1980's great and what Puebloans are willing to do to make it a better city. In fact we have no issues raising taxes to increase employment, the 1/2 sales tax for primary jobs, or to help downtown as we built the Riverwalk, convention center, ice rink, art and theater complex etc. Also, I am told that the final phase of the Riverwalk should be done by 2020, this will help create a lot of growth in downtown Pueblo. This is a lot of money for a city that is arguably the least affluent big city in Colorado and given the lower wages people make in Pueblo I would be willing to bet Puebloans spend more money per person when you take that inconsideration on making our city better then any large city in Colorado.

I, also, agree that Pueblo has a ways to go but we are on the right track as Pueblo is improving, even during this recession, due to what we have done in downtown, the university and alternative energy. This is the latest in a national publication that talks about what is going on in Pueblo:

The proposed plant, with its 468 workers, is expected to make a selection before April 1. Pueblo, with its proposed Colorado Energy Park – providing land for solar, nuclear and other energy technologies – seems like a logical choice. The city is also a likely choice given its 6.0 rating for solar irradiance (on a domestic scale of 2.0 to 6.5) and its more than 300 days of sunshine per year.

The link: Vibrant, Helios Eye Pueblo, Colorado for Solar Factory | Cooler Planet News

So while things are bad now, as stated, they have been much worse and Pueblo is setting itself up to benefit from alternative energy in the 21st century much like Denver and Houston benefited from the oil industry in the 20th century.

Last edited by Josseppie; 02-08-2010 at 09:42 PM..
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Old 03-07-2010, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Colorado
18,833 posts, read 4,944,589 times
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Some people don't care for Pueblo or Pueblo West, that's fine by me. Everyone to their own tastes.
Here's my take, not to offend anyone from anywhere, places I've lived.
Youngstown in my youth, okay, but wouldn't care to move back.
San Diego, crowded, getting more polluted, lots of traffic, expensive.
Los Angeles, more crowded, more polluted, lots of traffic, expensive.
Atlanta, nice, but don't care for the humidity of the south.
Craig, Colorado, nice small town but cold a lot of the year, some don't mind that.

So, for us, Pueblo West is fine. It's not perfect, but we don't wish we were somewhere else either.
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Old 03-07-2010, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,180 posts, read 21,025,157 times
Reputation: 4259
Quote:
Originally Posted by pekemom View Post
Some people don't care for Pueblo or Pueblo West, that's fine by me. Everyone to their own tastes.
Here's my take, not to offend anyone from anywhere, places I've lived.
Youngstown in my youth, okay, but wouldn't care to move back.
San Diego, crowded, getting more polluted, lots of traffic, expensive.
Los Angeles, more crowded, more polluted, lots of traffic, expensive.
Atlanta, nice, but don't care for the humidity of the south.
Craig, Colorado, nice small town but cold a lot of the year, some don't mind that.

So, for us, Pueblo West is fine. It's not perfect, but we don't wish we were somewhere else either.
That is all anyone can ask as no city is perfect, even Pueblo.

You said you lived in Youngstown. Can you share with us the differences between them and Pueblo? For example I know they have lost people and in fact Pueblo is larger now. Does that mean we have done a better job since the economic collapse or is there something else going on? I ask this because Pueblo is one of the few old "steel towns" to be growing again and I wonder why.
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