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Old 02-27-2011, 10:40 PM
 
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Hi!
I am looking into a move out of AZ and possibly to CO. But, not too sure if I could handle living in very much snow. Where does it snow the least? I want to stay kinda close to AZ too.
What are your thoughts about Cortez or Durango?
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Old 02-28-2011, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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If you don't think you could handle living in snow, why are you looking at moving to CO?

I've never been to SW Colorado, but AZ doesn't appear to be too far. Cortez is only 47 miles from Teec Nos Pos.

The NCDC says Cortez gets 24 inches/snow a year, which isn't very much. Other sources are showing annual snowfall in the mid-30 inch range.

The NCDC says Fort Lewis (near Durango) gets 68 inches. Other sources show about the same.
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Old 02-28-2011, 08:23 AM
 
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I think you need to do some serious climate research. Here's a good place to start that I've cited many times before: Weatherbase . Also, just because a locale has little winter snowfall in Colorado does not mean that it does not get quite cold. Where I live, as an example, gets relatively little winter snow, but it's been -15 F. a couple of times this winter, with a couple of weeks that it didn't get above freezing. Right this minute, it's 23 here.
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Old 02-28-2011, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
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I would suggest visiting the areas you want to live in and talking to local (NOT real estate) people in a cafe or corner gas station.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:48 AM
 
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Both Jazzlover and Jim9251 are right.

68 inches in Durango sounds about right, but not every winter. I've seen it snow 2 feet in Durango in a half days time. Cortez at 24 inches? Hmm. You go up 491 a ways and I've seen snow stacked up a tad more than 2 feet, but that's just me.

Now if you want extreme snow, there's always Silverton, about 50 miles north of Durango. Right now I'm guessing 6 feet of snow is sitting in peoples yards right now. I've seen it higher than that!
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Old 02-28-2011, 10:29 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
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Cortez is your best bet, for what its worth. We got only one major storm this winter, but then again last winter we got snow out the whazoo. Like someone else said, even without the snow, it's often pretty cold. And its cold here right now. Cortez is as close to living in Arizona as you can get, but the climate is still far more Colorado than it is Arizona-like. Plus, Cortez is very small and isolated. You pretty much have to drive 4 hours to get ANYWHERE.

Forget Durango. They gets lots of snow
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Old 02-28-2011, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I think you need to do some serious climate research. Here's a good place to start that I've cited many times before: Weatherbase . Also, just because a locale has little winter snowfall in Colorado does not mean that it does not get quite cold. Where I live, as an example, gets relatively little winter snow, but it's been -15 F. a couple of times this winter, with a couple of weeks that it didn't get above freezing. Right this minute, it's 23 here.
Weatherbase shows Cortez at 39.2/annual snowfall and Durango at 65.4.

NCDC has Yellow Jacket at 68.5, Northdale at 35.5, and Mesa Verde at 83.6.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:14 PM
 
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Thanks you guys.
I'm contemplating CO because my fiance really wants to move there and I want to move somewhere to get out of the AZ heat. But, being an AZ native, I really don't think I could handle extreme cold and snow. If it was a little bit in moderation than maybe.
Thank you for the insight!
Got any other advice for me?

-Tara
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Old 03-01-2011, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taranicc View Post
But, being an AZ native, I really don't think I could handle extreme cold and snow. I
It's very likely you could acclimate.
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Old 03-01-2011, 12:38 PM
 
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Wink Compromise to what

You might want to ask your fiance what kind of Colorado experience she has in mind.

If Cortez and Durango near enough, and both in southwest Colorado, otherwise they do not share much in common. That goes for much the rest of the state as well. Cold and snow will not be the only factors. Like trees, for instance. There are some in Cortez, but it is hardly in a forest. Etc. Durango is appreciably more verdant, sees more snow, but is in the banana belt compared to Silverton farther north in the San Juans.

Everywhere in Colorado will have some snow and cold come winter. Lamar, in southeastern Colorado, less so than in the mountains, but when the high country might seem pleasantly cool to you in summer, Lamar perchance too hot. Same thing could apply to Cortez.

Thing is the interior of this country is more or less a land of extremes. Cold in winter, hot in summer. Or a place such as Phoenix that is warm and then quite hot. One thought was Flagstaff, AZ, but possibly a bit cooler than you may prefer in winter, and it gets more snow than many locals in Colorado. Perhaps one could split the difference in living between there and Phoenix, as a marked change in elevation and climates in a short distance. But none of them exactly mild, but compromise. However less intemperate than north of Flag, with the whole northeast quadrant of Arizona rather harsh. Consider that to encapsulate Cortez as well, even if without much snow.

That is one reason why so many people live along Colorado's front range. About as temperate as you will find. Some areas, such as the Palmer Divide, see a fair amount of snow, with others it more of a novelty. Pueblo would be one of the warmer locals. Many people really like the weather of the front range, so you may as well, or well enough.

Or perhaps try something farther west. The mountains running from California through Washington state, in the Sierra Nevada and Cascades, receive a lot of snow. But temperatures are usually much milder than in the Rocky Mountain West. If wishing to do without much of the snow that is traditionally measured in feet then one might settle in the foothills. Say possibly along CA 49, which runs north and south through California's old gold country. The small, quaint towns along that road see very little snow in winter, if perhaps a bit warmer than desired in summer. If so, then head up and east a bit until finding the best compromise.

Other options could lie farther north, even within or without the Seattle metro area. Winter temperatures seldom reach much below freezing, although not much above in the 40's. It can feel cold due the humidity, with Puget Sound as close, but kids revel in the infrequent snows. There are any number of smaller towns outside, but not that far from Seattle. Due the climate it is a lush place, and easy enough to either be within a forest, near it, or seem like it. Many residents say the near perfect summers make up for grey skies most of the winter, not at all the more usual blue of Colorado. With temps so close to freezing there the usually effortless driving can on certain days become quite challenging due slushy snow to ice. Certain days when one would rather be driving in Colorado, or just not at all. Then, too, if actually near Seattle and using I-5, one may well wish instead on I-25, and upset with only that level of traffic.

Of course Cortez has none of that, or much snow, but may or not be the dream in reality.
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