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Old 03-19-2011, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
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Hello. I currently live in the Denver metro area and want to move out of Denver soon. But I still want to move somewhere within the state. Yes...i know Colorado as a whole doesnt get much percipitation,but what is the rainiest place in Colorado.? I quite enjoy the rain and wanna be somewhere thats slightly less "Dry". It doesnt matter if its a small town or not. I heard that Estes Park Rains a bit more than denver. Can someone clarify this.? Thanks for any help i get!
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Old 03-19-2011, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
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Crested Butte is pretty lush.

http://climate.colostate.edu/CO_precip_status.php

http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/cgibin/...ti.pl?state=CO

http://www.co.nrcs.usda.gov/snow/prec/prec_all.html

Last edited by lalahartma; 03-19-2011 at 05:33 PM..
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Old 03-19-2011, 05:40 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezter View Post
Hello. I currently live in the Denver metro area and want to move out of Denver soon. But I still want to move somewhere within the state. Yes...i know Colorado as a whole doesnt get much percipitation,but what is the rainiest place in Colorado.? I quite enjoy the rain and wanna be somewhere thats slightly less "Dry". It doesnt matter if its a small town or not. I heard that Estes Park Rains a bit more than denver. Can someone clarify this.? Thanks for any help i get!
You can research for yourself on Weatherbase - Travel, Vacation and Weather Averages and Records . By "rainiest," do you mean the most rainfall, or the most annual precipitation? The two are very different things in Colorado. If you are asking what area has the most precipitation in June, July, and August ("summer" in Colorado), you're not far from that now. The Palmer Divide, from south of Castle Rock to Colorado Springs, is one of the rainiest locales in Colorado in summer. Another high summer precipitation area is around Rye, just east of the Wet Mountains. Both of those locales actually get more rain in summer than most mountain locations, excepting some areas of the San Juan Mountains, which do get a fair amount of summer precipitation. Even those wettest areas get generally an average of less than 8" of rain in those three summer months. Compare that to locales in, say, central to eastern Kansas, that average more than 10" in June, July and August, plus having wet spring months, too.

If you add the spring months into the equation along with summer, the highest rainfall areas for that are in far northeastern Colorado on the High Plains.

The overall wettest locations year-round in Colorado are in the high mountain areas of the San Juan mountains, but very snowy winters contribute to the total. Two of the wettest towns with a year-round population are Rico and Silverton--but both have extremely rigorous climates with a frost-free season that can last as short as 2 or 3 weeks in a rough year.
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Old 03-19-2011, 05:40 PM
 
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What you are looking for is snow, because the elevations in the mountains that support moisture being dumped on them frequently, are so high that 9-10 months of the year the precip is going to come down as frozen precip.
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Old 03-20-2011, 07:33 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
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Telluride seems to get a lot of rain - and snow!
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Old 03-22-2011, 10:59 AM
 
Location: The Big CO
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You better move somewhere up into the mountains, and not in the valleys near the mountains. Anywhere off the mountains in CO does get much rain at all. 6 areas in colorado are classified as desert, and other areas that are not technically desert do not receive much rainfall at all. For example, Denver, C-Springs, FoCo, Boulder, Longmont, Loveland, Greeley, La Junta, Rocky Ford, Las Animas, Montrose, Gunnison. Those cities receive very little rainfall but are technically not desert lands. Where as, Pueblo, Canon City, Florence, San Luis Valley, Cortez, Dove Creek, Ignacio, Olathe, Delta, Naturita, Nucla, Gateway, Whitewater, Orchard City, Grand Junction, Fruita, Parachute, Battlement Mesa, Dinosaur, Rangely, are all located in the CO desert lands and desert areas. Even Craig, Meeker, Rifle, and Silt are pretty much the desert.

All in all, rainfall is scarce is CO, with the exception of the extremely high altitude areas deep into the mountains.
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Old 03-22-2011, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
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I second Jazzlover's post on the Palmer Divide. I live in Castle Rock and it seems like there isn't a day in summer where I'm not able to watch some huge storm rumble on by towards the south. There aren't many people in that immediate area, but Monument and Larkspur are very close by. Castle Rock tends to pick up on some of the thunderstorm activity of the area more often than Denver proper as well.
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Old 04-10-2011, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Greenwood Village, Colorado
2,185 posts, read 3,888,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezter View Post
Hello. I currently live in the Denver metro area and want to move out of Denver soon. But I still want to move somewhere within the state. Yes...i know Colorado as a whole doesnt get much percipitation,but what is the rainiest place in Colorado.? I quite enjoy the rain and wanna be somewhere thats slightly less "Dry". It doesnt matter if its a small town or not. I heard that Estes Park Rains a bit more than denver. Can someone clarify this.? Thanks for any help i get!

That's funny because the other day you posted that you liked Denver for it's mediterranean climate.
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Old 04-10-2011, 10:49 AM
ndk
 
Location: Estes Park
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jazzlover nailed it, but since nobody seems to have answered your original question, no, Estes Park doesn't get much more precipitation than Denver. High elevations on the west side of RMNP certainly do, but the Estes Valley itself is quite dry.

Also, interesting little map:

http://www.nationalatlas.gov/printab...precip_co3.pdf

The Palmer Divide gets my vote too.
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Old 04-10-2011, 03:41 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
That's funny because the other day you posted that you liked Denver for it's mediterranean climate.
I about choked on my Cheerios when I read that. There is absolutely NOTHING "Mediterranean" about the climate of Denver or anywhere else in Colorado. A "Mediterranean" climate is characterized by a dry season/wet season climate regime--with wet winters and almost rainless summers. The Plains area of Colorado has almost the opposite climate, with dry winters and wet springs and early summers. In the mountains, early winter is generally dry, with most moisture coming in late winter and early spring. In Colorado's northern mountains, there generally is a secondary moisture peak in June; in the southern Colorado mountains, it occurs from mid-July to late August. In much of the lower elevation areas of western Colorado, especially southwestern Colorado, the Southwest Monsoon period, from mid-July to mid-August, often sees the most precipitation for the year. Another feature of a "Mediterranean" climate is atmospheric stability that does not lead to convection. As a result, in a "Mediterranean" climate, thunderstorms occur only very infrequently and usually are not severe when they occasionally do occur. Colorado is polar opposite of that, with convection in the atmosphere occurring almost daily in the summer, which leads to frequent thunderstorm activity, sometimes severe in numerous areas of the state.

For a "Mediterranean" climate in the US, one must be in California, which does have a classic Mediterranean climate of wet winters and extremely dry summers. That is why many California transplants to Colorado--expecting a climate similar to what they left in California--often get a very rude surprise.
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