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Old 03-24-2011, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,452,867 times
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Isitmeorarethingsnuts wrote:
Interesting that you think it wise to learn the language of the country you are going to. What an original thought.
***************
Yeah, as Tony Robbins would say...What A Concept!

 
Old 03-24-2011, 01:08 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,099,702 times
Reputation: 9065
There are actually two very distinct Hispanic communities in Colorado, and they are quite different from one another and sometimes don't even get along with each other very well. First, there is the community of Colorado-born native Hispanics, many of whom can trace their family roots back many generations--often to the "Nuevo Mejicanos" who settled in New Mexico before this part of the US was even part of the United States. A number of them are actually offended if you call them "Mexican," and will tell you that they are "Spanish." They form a relatively large part of the Hispanic community of southern Colorado, especially in places like the San Luis Valley. The second group is "immigrated Hispanics," mostly from Mexico, but also from other Latin American countries. Some of these people are recent immigrants or second-generation, at best. A lot of them, sadly, are also illegal immigrants that our feckless government has foolishly let enter this country. A lot of that group has traditionally settled in Colorado's agricultural areas, where there has been seasonal farm work. More and more, though, they settle in the metro areas and in the resort towns--the latter being where they hold a lot of the low-paying service jobs. A lot of the growth in the Hispanic population in Colorado in the last 20 years has been from immigrants--and in many ways, that has not been positive. The illegals, especially, have a disproportionate number of people who try to milk the welfare system, or are involved in drug or criminal activity. I know a lot of very honest, hard working Colorado Hispanics who are quite offended and upset about how these less-than-savory people have sullied the reputation of their culture. One day, an older Hispanic fellow I know--a old-line native of the San Luis Valley--had an illegal Mexican immigrant walk up to him at a medical clinic and speak to him in Spanish about how to "game" the medical care system. That old line native told the guy in no uncertain terms--in perfect Spanish--what he thought of him, and the guy left. That older Hispanic fellow turned to me (and I'm an Anglo) and said, "That guy is not one of us."

So, when people read about the "Hispanic population in Colorado" they need to be aware that it is not a homogeneous block of people, but a diverse group with very pronounced cultural differences within it.
 
Old 03-24-2011, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,255,168 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
There are actually two very distinct Hispanic communities in Colorado, and they are quite different from one another and sometimes don't even get along with each other very well. First, there is the community of Colorado-born native Hispanics, many of whom can trace their family roots back many generations--often to the "Nuevo Mejicanos" who settled in New Mexico before this part of the US was even part of the United States. A number of them are actually offended if you call them "Mexican," and will tell you that they are "Spanish." They form a relatively large part of the Hispanic community of southern Colorado, especially in places like the San Luis Valley. The second group is "immigrated Hispanics," mostly from Mexico, but also from other Latin American countries. Some of these people are recent immigrants or second-generation, at best. A lot of them, sadly, are also illegal immigrants that our feckless government has foolishly let enter this country. A lot of that group has traditionally settled in Colorado's agricultural areas, where there has been seasonal farm work. More and more, though, they settle in the metro areas and in the resort towns--the latter being where they hold a lot of the low-paying service jobs. A lot of the growth in the Hispanic population in Colorado in the last 20 years has been from immigrants--and in many ways, that has not been positive. The illegals, especially, have a disproportionate number of people who try to milk the welfare system, or are involved in drug or criminal activity. I know a lot of very honest, hard working Colorado Hispanics who are quite offended and upset about how these less-than-savory people have sullied the reputation of their culture. One day, an older Hispanic fellow I know--a old-line native of the San Luis Valley--had an illegal Mexican immigrant walk up to him at a medical clinic and speak to him in Spanish about how to "game" the medical care system. That old line native told the guy in no uncertain terms--in perfect Spanish--what he thought of him, and the guy left. That older Hispanic fellow turned to me (and I'm an Anglo) and said, "That guy is not one of us."

So, when people read about the "Hispanic population in Colorado" they need to be aware that it is not a homogeneous block of people, but a diverse group with very pronounced cultural differences within it.
That's one of the most offensive over-generalizations I've ever read on here.
 
Old 03-25-2011, 01:55 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,516,574 times
Reputation: 9490
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
That's one of the most offensive over-generalizations I've ever read on here.
I thought it was quite acurate and insightful. Did it hit a nerve with you somehow?
 
Old 03-25-2011, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Colorado
2,561 posts, read 4,869,411 times
Reputation: 2219
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
There are actually two very distinct Hispanic communities in Colorado, and they are quite different from one another and sometimes don't even get along with each other very well. First, there is the community of Colorado-born native Hispanics, many of whom can trace their family roots back many generations--often to the "Nuevo Mejicanos" who settled in New Mexico before this part of the US was even part of the United States. A number of them are actually offended if you call them "Mexican," and will tell you that they are "Spanish." They form a relatively large part of the Hispanic community of southern Colorado, especially in places like the San Luis Valley. The second group is "immigrated Hispanics," mostly from Mexico, but also from other Latin American countries. Some of these people are recent immigrants or second-generation, at best. A lot of them, sadly, are also illegal immigrants that our feckless government has foolishly let enter this country. A lot of that group has traditionally settled in Colorado's agricultural areas, where there has been seasonal farm work. More and more, though, they settle in the metro areas and in the resort towns--the latter being where they hold a lot of the low-paying service jobs. A lot of the growth in the Hispanic population in Colorado in the last 20 years has been from immigrants--and in many ways, that has not been positive. The illegals, especially, have a disproportionate number of people who try to milk the welfare system, or are involved in drug or criminal activity. I know a lot of very honest, hard working Colorado Hispanics who are quite offended and upset about how these less-than-savory people have sullied the reputation of their culture. One day, an older Hispanic fellow I know--a old-line native of the San Luis Valley--had an illegal Mexican immigrant walk up to him at a medical clinic and speak to him in Spanish about how to "game" the medical care system. That old line native told the guy in no uncertain terms--in perfect Spanish--what he thought of him, and the guy left. That older Hispanic fellow turned to me (and I'm an Anglo) and said, "That guy is not one of us."

So, when people read about the "Hispanic population in Colorado" they need to be aware that it is not a homogeneous block of people, but a diverse group with very pronounced cultural differences within it.
Spot on...Actually as you know the same can be said to a lesser extent around Colorado's Western slope(Grand Valley) many of the anglos are the newcomers by comparison to some of the oldest hispanic Colorado blood lines.

My grandparents ranched for years with many of the families who left the Alamosa area for the more temperate Parachute,Silt, Rifle areas after their grandparents had farmed and ranched for years along the San Luis ditch. The illegal thing may be getting more widespread, but Colorado has a rich hispanic history and heritage to say the least.
 
Old 03-25-2011, 03:32 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,516,574 times
Reputation: 9490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
I thought it was quite acurate and insightful. Did it hit a nerve with you somehow?
Make that "accurate" -2 sp I blame public school...
 
Old 03-25-2011, 03:38 AM
 
168 posts, read 323,669 times
Reputation: 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
There are actually two very distinct Hispanic communities in Colorado, and they are quite different from one another and sometimes don't even get along with each other very well. First, there is the community of Colorado-born native Hispanics, many of whom can trace their family roots back many generations--often to the "Nuevo Mejicanos" who settled in New Mexico before this part of the US was even part of the United States. A number of them are actually offended if you call them "Mexican," and will tell you that they are "Spanish." They form a relatively large part of the Hispanic community of southern Colorado, especially in places like the San Luis Valley. The second group is "immigrated Hispanics," mostly from Mexico, but also from other Latin American countries. Some of these people are recent immigrants or second-generation, at best. A lot of them, sadly, are also illegal immigrants that our feckless government has foolishly let enter this country. A lot of that group has traditionally settled in Colorado's agricultural areas, where there has been seasonal farm work. More and more, though, they settle in the metro areas and in the resort towns--the latter being where they hold a lot of the low-paying service jobs. A lot of the growth in the Hispanic population in Colorado in the last 20 years has been from immigrants--and in many ways, that has not been positive. The illegals, especially, have a disproportionate number of people who try to milk the welfare system, or are involved in drug or criminal activity. I know a lot of very honest, hard working Colorado Hispanics who are quite offended and upset about how these less-than-savory people have sullied the reputation of their culture. One day, an older Hispanic fellow I know--a old-line native of the San Luis Valley--had an illegal Mexican immigrant walk up to him at a medical clinic and speak to him in Spanish about how to "game" the medical care system. That old line native told the guy in no uncertain terms--in perfect Spanish--what he thought of him, and the guy left. That older Hispanic fellow turned to me (and I'm an Anglo) and said, "That guy is not one of us."

So, when people read about the "Hispanic population in Colorado" they need to be aware that it is not a homogeneous block of people, but a diverse group with very pronounced cultural differences within it.
This pretty accurately describes what I discovered back in Nevada, when working for one of the casinos...It seemed as though every day that first week on the job someone would introduce/explain themselves as "I am not from Mexico, I am from *insert any other Latin American country or US state*" - said with conviction....... While I am sure it is true, and exists as stated, I often wondered if it was also a generational problem.....It seems the older generations placed a higher value on integrity, dignity, honorable work ethics - more than the younger generations do.....The younger gens seem to lack the patience, therefore tend to "push things along" to get what they want - any way they can (and the majority of them had roots in Mexico)...At least that was my experiences with the "inner divisions" - quite possibly a combination of all those factors.....

Unfortunately the Hispanic population has become the poster child for illegal immigration, while many other people from all over the world are entering the USA via the rogue ways - just in a more quieter approach......But no matter where they come from, they should be doing so legally to begin with, then there wouldn't be any doubt who "belongs here".....

Last edited by naturegirll; 03-25-2011 at 03:54 AM..
 
Old 03-25-2011, 05:46 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,255,168 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
I thought it was quite acurate and insightful. Did it hit a nerve with you somehow?
Yeah, xenophobia usually does.
 
Old 03-25-2011, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
12,840 posts, read 23,205,680 times
Reputation: 12223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
The demographcs are undeniable. The US will inexorably, and not-so-gradually, become a majority hispanic Spanish speaking country.
Not when you have several-generations-removed-from-"the motherland" people like myself to water (aka English) it down.

-------------------------------------------------------

I'm not trying to put myself in a box here, but it's funny (when oneself can be classified as Hispanic) to hear discussions like this and not fit in with either the "illegals" or "old-line Hispanic Coloradans". I feel like a some sort of fly on a wall.

Y'know, some of this growth has been because of people like me as well (sorry {not}).
 
Old 03-25-2011, 09:11 AM
 
3,204 posts, read 2,383,737 times
Reputation: 1544
Quote:
Originally Posted by naturegirll View Post
This pretty accurately describes what I discovered back in Nevada, when working for one of the casinos...It seemed as though every day that first week on the job someone would introduce/explain themselves as "I am not from Mexico, I am from *insert any other Latin American country or US state*" - said with conviction....... While I am sure it is true, and exists as stated, I often wondered if it was also a generational problem.....It seems the older generations placed a higher value on integrity, dignity, honorable work ethics - more than the younger generations do.....The younger gens seem to lack the patience, therefore tend to "push things along" to get what they want - any way they can (and the majority of them had roots in Mexico)...At least that was my experiences with the "inner divisions" - quite possibly a combination of all those factors.....

Unfortunately the Hispanic population has become the poster child for illegal immigration, while many other people from all over the world are entering the USA via the rogue ways - just in a more quieter approach......But no matter where they come from, they should be doing so legally to begin with, then there wouldn't be any doubt who "belongs here".....
When groups like MALDEF and LaRaza took the helm of the pro illegal immigration movement THEY were the ones that attempted to make this about race. They are guilty of pushing most of the blame for this invasion on Hispanics. As a previous poster noted they have Hispanic friends (as do I) yet they are labeled xenophobic for pointing out the difference in those here legally and those that came to rob us of our resources. They have even hired people to infiltrate message boards to try to sway the thinking of the citizens of this country. It would be great if someone would inform them that name calling and inciting do little to address the issues that come along with this invasion. More than half of the births in the last decade were Hispanic. I'm not saying they were all illegal just that it is pretty interesting statistically.
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