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Old 03-30-2011, 08:58 PM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,296 times
Reputation: 157

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Denver is DRASTICALLY different than midwest cities like Kansas City, Omaha, St. Louis, Minneapolis-St. Paul, etc. Just look at the demographics of Denver and CO. Also, the "Eastern Half" that people are referring to is more like the eastern third. Also, the New Mexico high plains have much in common with the midwest states of Kansas for example. Just look at the vast third of new mexico that is high plains just like colorado. I agree the eastern part of CO has midwest characteristics of plains and such, but in our metro areas, we look at mountains. Does anywhere in the midwest have mountains around them....NO.

And if people want to go geographically and climatically, than our plains are most definitely NOT part of the midwest. Our plains are high elevation plains and arid. Most cities on our plains receive between 11-15 inches of rain, and thats much different than the plains states in the midwest. For example, 50-55% of CO is mountainous, 30% high plains, and 15-20% desert terrain. There are no deserts in the midwest, and there are no mountains in the midwest. If people want to include CO in the midwest, than lets just throw Eastern New Mexico, Eastern Wyoming, Central and Eastern Montana, West Texas, and Oklahoma in the midwest right??? Culturally we are not midwest either. The midwest is very very religous, and Colorado usually ranks as one of the least religous states in America. 25% of CO claims absolutely no religion, and the US average is 17%. That number is most definitely much smaller in the midwest.

 
Old 03-30-2011, 09:07 PM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,296 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The funny (ironic) thing is, I grew up in Pittsburgh, which many people argue vehemently to be the eastern terminus of the midwest, and now I live in metro Denver, supposedly the western terminus of same.
Most people consider Denver and CO the southern mountain west. I usually do not like the Southwest/Northwest definitions. For example, is Utah, Colorado, and Nevada part of the southwest? Or is Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho part of the northwest? Meanwhile, the answer to those questions are "IDK...They are part of the mountain west". I always say that there is no way that Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona are not in the same region. They share the same climates, wide varieties of terrain, demographically, food, culture, etc.

CO has a spanish name for crying out loud. It means "Red Colored". You can't find that in the MIDWEST. It always seem that people who group CO with the midwest are from somewhere else, have never been to Colorado, or do not know enough about the history of Colorado. Over half of our state was part of Mexico before the Treaty of Hidalgo, and another quarter of the state was part of disputed territory. Our two largest groups of Native Americans who lived in CO were Utes and Anasazi/Pueblo. We also had jicarilla apache in southern and southeastern CO.

I just resent the fact that some people group Denver and CO in with the midwest. its so drastically different. Just go to Omaha, KC, STL, TWIN CITIES, CHI, DET, CLEV, etc. and i think anyone could see that Denver is not midwest.
 
Old 03-30-2011, 09:16 PM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,296 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by lalahartma View Post
I don't know, the eastern half of Co is kinda midwestern. And not very mountainy. And where is the Southwest on the map? Even though CO is the least southwesterny of the bunch commonly thought of as SW.
Southwest United States is usually the least accepted by geographers of America. For example, its much more easy to see that AZ, CO, NM, UT, NV, ID, MT, and WY are mountain west and that you can group those states into Northern Mountain West and Southern Mountain West.

CO definitely seems southwestern once you go south of C-Springs on I-25. For example, Pueblo, La Junta, Rocky Ford, Trinidad, Walsenburg, and the San Luis Valley Desert.

I usually prefer to just use the definitions of the West Coast, Pacific NW, Northern MW, and Southern MW for the western states. Once you go east of CO and NM its just so much different than the WEST. You can easily see this is the WEST, not MIDWEST, when you enter Golden and see the signs "Golden...Where the WEST lives".

Even the food that CO specializes in is Southwest Cuisine. We do New Mexican Cuisine here and thats the majority of the restaurants in CO. I just cannot and will not ever group CO with the midwest. Scenically, climatically, culturally, food wise, demographically, etc. Also, another fact that is know is that the HIGH PLAINS in NM and CO are not like the great plains in the sense that they also have buttes and canyons on our plains. MUCH different than the midwest.
 
Old 03-30-2011, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,607 posts, read 20,181,666 times
Reputation: 5311
Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Southwest United States is usually the least accepted by geographers of America. For example, its much more easy to see that AZ, CO, NM, UT, NV, ID, MT, and WY are mountain west and that you can group those states into Northern Mountain West and Southern Mountain West.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Most people consider Denver and CO the southern mountain west. I usually do not like the Southwest/Northwest definitions. For example, is Utah, Colorado, and Nevada part of the southwest? Or is Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho part of the northwest? Meanwhile, the answer to those questions are "IDK...They are part of the mountain west". I always say that there is no way that Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona are not in the same region. They share the same climates, wide varieties of terrain, demographically, food, culture, etc.
If only reality was as black and white as you picture it. In fact, when it comes to all those categories you named above-- terrain, demographics, food, culture, each subregion within the western US (which often transcends state boundaries) is unique and there really isn't any one thing that ties them all together.

I've lived in 4 different places-- Denver, Phoenix, Los Angeles, Reno, and I've spent a lot of time in Albuquerque and Las Vegas. I lived in Phoenix for 4 years and I don't know ANYBODY who considers Arizona a "mountain west" state.

BTW, I've never heard the term "southern mountain west" before ever. I think at this point you're just making stuff up.
 
Old 03-30-2011, 10:51 PM
 
Location: The North
4,962 posts, read 8,675,201 times
Reputation: 3831
Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Denver is DRASTICALLY different than midwest cities like Kansas City, Omaha, St. Louis, Minneapolis-St. Paul, etc. Just look at the demographics of Denver and CO. Also, the "Eastern Half" that people are referring to is more like the eastern third. Also, the New Mexico high plains have much in common with the midwest states of Kansas for example. Just look at the vast third of new mexico that is high plains just like colorado. I agree the eastern part of CO has midwest characteristics of plains and such, but in our metro areas, we look at mountains. Does anywhere in the midwest have mountains around them....NO.

And if people want to go geographically and climatically, than our plains are most definitely NOT part of the midwest. Our plains are high elevation plains and arid. Most cities on our plains receive between 11-15 inches of rain, and thats much different than the plains states in the midwest. For example, 50-55% of CO is mountainous, 30% high plains, and 15-20% desert terrain. There are no deserts in the midwest, and there are no mountains in the midwest. If people want to include CO in the midwest, than lets just throw Eastern New Mexico, Eastern Wyoming, Central and Eastern Montana, West Texas, and Oklahoma in the midwest right??? Culturally we are not midwest either. The midwest is very very religous, and Colorado usually ranks as one of the least religous states in America. 25% of CO claims absolutely no religion, and the US average is 17%. That number is most definitely much smaller in the midwest.
There is no break in the zone between Omaha or KC and Denver. Its just a sloping plain uphill caused by the collision of two large plates. You'd be hard pressed to find a geologist who would say Eastern Colorado is not in the same region as Nebraska or even Iowa. Regions are not marked by weather, they are marked by topography.
 
Old 03-30-2011, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,687 posts, read 34,675,136 times
Reputation: 9219
Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Why is it that some people think CO is part of the midwest???
I have never heard that said before. Who have you met who said that, and where were they from?
 
Old 03-31-2011, 03:28 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Even the food that CO specializes in is Southwest Cuisine. We do New Mexican Cuisine here and thats the majority of the restaurants in CO.
Now I know you're pulling our legs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
BTW, I've never heard the term "southern mountain west" before ever. I think at this point you're just making stuff up.
Gotta agree with you there.

Last edited by CAVA1990; 03-31-2011 at 03:41 AM..
 
Old 03-31-2011, 07:48 AM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,296 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
If only reality was as black and white as you picture it. In fact, when it comes to all those categories you named above-- terrain, demographics, food, culture, each subregion within the western US (which often transcends state boundaries) is unique and there really isn't any one thing that ties them all together.

I've lived in 4 different places-- Denver, Phoenix, Los Angeles, Reno, and I've spent a lot of time in Albuquerque and Las Vegas. I lived in Phoenix for 4 years and I don't know ANYBODY who considers Arizona a "mountain west" state.

BTW, I've never heard the term "southern mountain west" before ever. I think at this point you're just making stuff up.
I was only saying to consider Arizona, New Mexico, even Utah, Colorado, and Nevada as mountain states if someone does not use the terms NW and SW. There are more than one map out there that include Arizona as a mountain state. If you do not call these states Southwest, than what is it? West? Mountain State? I was just saying that CO, NM, UT, NV, and AZ tend to be the southern mountain states in the part of the country that has plenty of mountains out west. Thats all i was trying to say. How am I making anything up???
 
Old 03-31-2011, 08:03 AM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,296 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willy702 View Post
There is no break in the zone between Omaha or KC and Denver. Its just a sloping plain uphill caused by the collision of two large plates. You'd be hard pressed to find a geologist who would say Eastern Colorado is not in the same region as Nebraska or even Iowa. Regions are not marked by weather, they are marked by topography.
I was saying that culturally and people wise, Denver is drastically different than the midwest cities. Also, yes regions can be seperated by climate, culture, people, and topography all together. If it was simply topography that definied regions, than California and Oregon would in the same region, even though people consider CA as west coast and OR as PNW. They both have similar topography with coastal areas, mountains, and deserts in certain areas. However, culturally, demographically, climatically, they are greatly different and they are different regions. Also, if that was the case, much of Kentucky would be in the same region as say Ohio, even though KY is considered southern and OH is midwest. Or if topography was what made up regions, than Kansas would be in the same region as much of West and North Texas and Oklahoma right? Even though no one in their right mind considers Kansas and Texas to be in the same region. Another indication of topography not being the boundaries for regions is Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, etc. The appalachian mtns run north-south through these states even down further into the south, and these states share similarities with their toppgraphy, but are they in the same region??? No. They are not because climatically, demographically, culturally, and in most all instances they are very different. The same can said for the High Plains in Eastern CO being part of the midwest.

Also, no one has answered my question of if you are going to say well Eastern CO has high plains that look midwestern, than why aren't the high plains in West Texas and Eastern New Mexico lumped in as well? All of those high plains areas have the same climate, demographics, culture, terrain, etc. You will not find cities and towns on the plains in the midwest, where over one-third to a half of the population is Latino. For example, just look at La Junta, Rocky Ford, Las Animas, Lamar, Fort Morgan, Fort Lupton, Brighton, Greeley, etc. You wont find demogrpahics in small towns like that in the midwest. Its the exact same with smaller cities and towns on the New Mexico high plains. I do not really appreciate the rude comments left by people, seeing as these are very valid arguments. The only arguement one can make for CO being midwest is that the far eastern high plains look midwestern. After that, there is not much of an argument at all. Thats all i was saying.
 
Old 03-31-2011, 08:05 AM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,296 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I have never heard that said before. Who have you met who said that, and where were they from?
Just look at all the other posters on here. Its a common thought for people that CO is midwest, even though we are Mountain West/Southwest, depending on which you are using. The thought of Colorado being part of the midwest, or even like the midwest, is crazy i know.
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