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Old 04-10-2011, 02:03 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
12,840 posts, read 23,205,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Pueblo feels like NE??? Pueblo is high desert terrain. When you are in La Junta/Rocky Ford and you head west, it slowly grinds into high desert land when you approach Pueblo. Its the same when you head south of the springs on I-25, and about a good 25-30 miles before you reach Pueblo, it turns into high desert. Nebraska sure does not have anything remotely close to high desert. I know NE can get hot as well, but Pueblo has something like 80 days of 90 or above, and like 10-15 days of 100 or more a year. So the climate is way different. Overall, CO is a dry climate, not humid like most all of Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, etc.

East of the front range in CO is more close to the eastern plains in New Mexico and the high plains in West Texas. Large Latino populations, arid, low rainfall. Not to mention, the plains states don't normally have scattered canyons, buttes, and mesas on there plains. The Black Mesa in Oklahoma is the only one that comes to mind, and even over half of that is in New Mexico and Colorado. Colorado and New Mexico have scattered canyons, buttes, and mesas on our plains. Nebraska has absolutely zero spanish influence, like our plains in CO, NM, and TX. The only city on the plains in the midwest that has any sort of SW influence is Garden City.

I see your comparisons in the fact that they are plains and have farms, but that really is the only similarity. Climate, people, and other features of our plains make the area MUCH different. I was most of all saying that Pueblo is in the high desert, and is NOTHING like those states you mentioned. If anyone spends any significant time in cities in Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma, they will quickly realize CO cities are WAY different.
There is an argument to be made here for Scottsbluff and the Nebraska Panhandle.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Scottsbluff-Nebraska.html
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Old 04-10-2011, 06:42 AM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
There is an argument to be made here for Scottsbluff and the Nebraska Panhandle.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Scottsbluff-Nebraska.html
Does Pueblo feel like Scottsbluff NE??? I know it has a semi-decent size Latino population and receives about 15-16 inches of rain. But, thats the extreme western part of Nebraska. The humidity levels are still higher than places in Colorado. Even with its 15-16 inches of rain, it is not high desert. Pueblo only receives 12 inches of rain on average and have an even higher evaporation rate that qualifies it as high desert, due to the extreme low humidity and such. Even with low rainfall, the terrain has to look desert, and Nebraska (with the exception of the Scottsbluff national monument), Kansas, and most of Oklahoma (Black Mesa looks kind of desert though) do not. For example, La Junta and Rocky Ford only receive about 11-12 inches of rain, but they are high plains, not high desert. The same can be said for Fort Morgan and Fort Lupton in Northeastern CO.

Buttes don't necessarily mean high desert (Pawnee Buttes in NorCo are not high desert). I was just saying there tend to be more canyons, mesas, and buttes on the high plains of CO and NM. The Scottsbluff national monument and Black Mesa are good exceptions to that though. The terrain around Scottsbluff is still plains, not high desert terrain. The terrain around Pueblo and Scottsbluff still look completely different. I see the argument, but still to compare Pueblo and CO cities to places in the midwest is a disservice to CO.

Last edited by CO.Native.SW; 04-10-2011 at 06:53 AM..
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Old 04-10-2011, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,607 posts, read 20,188,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Does Pueblo feel like Scottsbluff NE??? I know it has a semi-decent size Latino population and receives about 15-16 inches of rain. But, thats the extreme western part of Nebraska. The humidity levels are still higher than places in Colorado. Even with its 15-16 inches of rain, it is not high desert. Pueblo only receives 12 inches of rain on average and have an even higher evaporation rate that qualifies it as high desert, due to the extreme low humidity and such. Even with low rainfall, the terrain has to look desert, and Nebraska (with the exception of the Scottsbluff national monument), Kansas, and most of Oklahoma (Black Mesa looks kind of desert though) do not. For example, La Junta and Rocky Ford only receive about 11-12 inches of rain, but they are high plains, not high desert. The same can be said for Fort Morgan and Fort Lupton in Northeastern CO.

Buttes don't necessarily mean high desert (Pawnee Buttes in NorCo are not high desert). I was just saying there tend to be more canyons, mesas, and buttes on the high plains of CO and NM. The Scottsbluff national monument and Black Mesa are good exceptions to that though. The terrain around Scottsbluff is still plains, not high desert terrain. The terrain around Pueblo and Scottsbluff still look completely different. I see the argument, but still to compare Pueblo and CO cities to places in the midwest is a disservice to CO.
Pueblo is not the true high desert southwest. It comes close, and the landscape north, west, and south of Pueblo does have a surprising amount of native cactuses, but its climate is still no Albuquerque (the quintessential high desert locale, w/ 8in of precip a year). Pueblo's climate really isn't all that different from Denver-- just a few degrees hotter in the summer, and with slighly colder winter nights.
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Old 04-11-2011, 10:42 AM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
Pueblo is not the true high desert southwest. It comes close, and the landscape north, west, and south of Pueblo does have a surprising amount of native cactuses, but its climate is still no Albuquerque (the quintessential high desert locale, w/ 8in of precip a year). Pueblo's climate really isn't all that different from Denver-- just a few degrees hotter in the summer, and with slighly colder winter nights.
Well Pueblo actually qualifies as high desert. The exact desert definition is a place with 10 inches of rainfall or less per year. If a place has higher than that, the evaporation must exceed the rainfall, which it does in Pueblo, Canon City, Florence, Cortez. For example, look at Tucson. Tucson receives a little over 12 inches of rainfall per year, but is classified as desert because of its high evaporation rate. I am not saying all areas of low rainfall in CO are desert. FoCo, Denver, Longmont, Boulder, Greeley, Fort Morgan, La Junta, Rocky Ford, C-Springs are not desert because they don't have the desert terrain, and the exceedingly high evaporation like Pueblo, Canon City, Florence, and Cortez do.

How is it surprising Colorado has native cacti? True, it would be extremely surprising if we had the Arizona type of cacti, but we have many smaller cacti that grows all over the state, as far east as the Pawnee Grasslands and the Rocky Ford/La Junta area.

Best of the High Deserts in CO?

I agree that overall, its not much different than Denver. Except for the fact that Pueblo receives about half or one third the snowfall of Denver, and about 3 inches less rainfall per year.
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Old 04-11-2011, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,351,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Well Pueblo actually qualifies as high desert. The exact desert definition is a place with 10 inches of rainfall or less per year. If a place has higher than that, the evaporation must exceed the rainfall, which it does in Pueblo, Canon City, Florence, Cortez. For example, look at Tucson. Tucson receives a little over 12 inches of rainfall per year, but is classified as desert because of its high evaporation rate. I am not saying all areas of low rainfall in CO are desert. FoCo, Denver, Longmont, Boulder, Greeley, Fort Morgan, La Junta, Rocky Ford, C-Springs are not desert because they don't have the desert terrain, and the exceedingly high evaporation like Pueblo, Canon City, Florence, and Cortez do.

How is it surprising Colorado has native cacti? True, it would be extremely surprising if we had the Arizona type of cacti, but we have many smaller cacti that grows all over the state, as far east as the Pawnee Grasslands and the Rocky Ford/La Junta area.

Best of the High Deserts in CO?

I agree that overall, its not much different than Denver. Except for the fact that Pueblo receives about half or one third the snowfall of Denver, and about 3 inches less rainfall per year.
I agree with this post 100% and I think its something that Pueblo, and CSU Pueblo, can and must use to our advantage. Live, work, play and go to school in Colorado close to great skiing yet live in a city that is usually warmer and gets less snow.
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Old 04-11-2011, 12:22 PM
 
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Whoever said that the Font Range Cities feel more like Kansas must not have a clue about Colorado. I don't know where these people get their info or what they expect from Colorado, but Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo, you can't get anymore Colorado than that. Colorado Springs has Pikes Peak, Garden of the Gods, Cheyenne Mountain, C'Mon man, Denver has Snow Capped Mountains, and so does Pueblo let's get real, I mean seriously like Kansas Oklahoma or the Pan Handle? Now if you said that about La Junta or Lamar I'd say maybe, because they're right there on the border, I guess you can say that about any state..To get back on topic I think most people who move to any Front Range Cities are very happy about the Colorado experience, it's equivalent to moving to the coast if you're on the coast you know you're there, if you're along the Front Range you know you're in Colorado.
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Old 04-11-2011, 03:26 PM
 
Location: The Big CO
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Albuquerque also does not get 8 inches of rain per year. On average it receives a little over 9 inches of rain, and exactly about 9.5 inches of rain.
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Old 04-11-2011, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,351,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CO.Native.SW View Post
Albuquerque also does not get 8 inches of rain per year. On average it receives a little over 9 inches of rain, and exactly about 9.5 inches of rain.
Pueblo has more natural vegetation then Albuquerque.
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Old 04-12-2011, 09:45 AM
 
Location: The Big CO
198 posts, read 1,043,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
Pueblo has more natural vegetation then Albuquerque.

Thats very true. However, its sort of like saying Tucson has more natural vegetation that Phoenix. There is A LOT of natural growing vegetation around Tucson, at least when I was there before.





With the other person comparing Pueblo's climate to Denver, they can be very similar. However, Pueblo is high desert and Denver is not quite that. Denver does have low rainfall, but not as low as our desert lands or desert areas with exceedingly high evaporation rates. Denver does have a high evaporation rate and is very dry (CO is a dry state and everyone knows that), but not quite as much as Pueblo, Cortez, etc. Also, people will look at roughly 50-60 inches of snow on average in Denver and think this is one of the snowiest places in this country. However, the highest number of days in history that Denver had snow on the ground in a year was 60 something days. Thats not much at all. The snow already melts rapidly in Denver, Boulder, FoCo, Greeley, C-Springs, and these places all receive about 40-60 inches of snow. Our snowiest cities (not counting those towns way UP IN THE MOUNTAINS) are not bad at all compared to places in the Midwest, Northeast, Northern Mountain States, etc. So, if you look at desert lands in CO, it snows much less and also melts very rapidly. Pueblo usually receives anywhere from 20-30 inches of snow a year, and it melts very quick. Its the same with Canon City, Penrose, Florence, Cortez, etc. On a side note, Albuquerque and GJ have practically the same climate. They really are about the same climate, with it getting a little cooler on winter nights in GJ. Thats really one of the only differences in those two climates.

All in all, CO has very sunny weather, and this whole region does, so the snowfall in Colorado is genreally not very bad at all. We do get huge snowfalls/blizzards, but usually about every 2-3 years and those will even melt more rapidly that blizzards in other parts of this country. And extreme cold (below zero, high's well below 30 degrees, etc) are rare in the winter and short lived. Even those days of extreme cold here in Denver only lasted about 3-4 days and that was the worst cold i can remeber after living my entire life here. Another thing to note is that during the extreme cold, its usually always sunny! So, when we have a average high in january of mid 40's to 50, its most likely sunny and feels even warmer.

I do agree with you saying that Pueblo and the SoCo high desert lands of Pueblo-Canon City-Florence-Penrose do need to use those to their advantage. I know Pueblo has been through economic struggles, and that has really stunted its growth the past 20-25 years. Pueblo's population has not grown all that much in 30 something years. Its crazy to look back on population growth since the 60's and 70's with C-Springs and Pueblo. They use to be right around the same population back in the 60's and 70's, but its changed drastically. They were both anywhere from 70,000-100,000 people, but the springs has grown into a big city, with a metropolitan area approaching 650,000-700,000 people. On the other hand, Pueblo is still at roughly 104,000 people, only a 7,000 person increase from 1970. If Pueblo hadn't hit big time economic struggles, it most likely would have had enough potential to be another big city in CO, similar to the springs. Granted, Denver will always be king (metro population over 3 million), but the springs will probably surpass 1 million people in its metro area in the next 10-15 maybe 20 years.

Last edited by CO.Native.SW; 04-12-2011 at 10:05 AM..
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Old 04-12-2011, 10:18 AM
 
Location: playing in the colorful Colorado dirt
4,486 posts, read 4,332,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CO_Transplant View Post
Geographically the area east of the mountains looks like all the states that I mentioned. Culturally, between the ranches, endless prairies, horrible farm smells, rodeos, and conservative nature of most of the small towns, this area is just an extension of the Great Plains!
Horrible farm smells?

I live out in the county and frankly I would take those over city stench anyday!

Consider what your life would be without our stinky old farms. Do you think the food you eat just magically appears on the grocery store shelves? No, farmers and ranchers work damn hard to get it there.

The horrible smell you refer to is just hard working, underpaid, often unappreciated people, the kind who built this country.

As for me, I love the smell of compost in the morning. Now, if you will excuse me, I have corn and beans to plant.
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