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Old 04-07-2011, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
4,160 posts, read 6,526,929 times
Reputation: 3381

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syringaloid View Post
...have you checked out Sandpoint (ski resort town too) or Coeur D'alene? (with ski resorts nearby)?
I don't think those two compare to the Sun Valley experience - not as "upscale" - but I prefer them too. One positive is being near enough to Spokane to spend an evening (or a day) doing those 'bigger city' things. I learned to sailboard at Sandpoint - way back in 1980 when that sport had yet to take off in the USA.

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Old 04-08-2011, 06:14 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,178,099 times
Reputation: 9066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Jazz: People get tired of playing the same golf links near their homes. Hell, in Myrtle Beach, SC, there are 125+ golf courses that hundreds of thousands flock to each year to play. Variety is the spice of life. Same for boating, cycling, etc.

And to compare any part of Colorado to anything Disney is to desecrate your own beloved state.
I stand on my original comment. Here is another voice who pretty much agrees--Denver Post columnist Ed Quillen. He the wrote the follwing back in 1987--not much has changed.

Tourism Leads To Degradation, Anyway

As far as the "tourist experience," Quillen had the right idea about that, too, back in 1988:

http://www.edquillen.com/eq1988/19881109p.html
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:41 PM
 
331 posts, read 869,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
It always amuses me that people want to come to Colorado--and then want to do the crap (golf, tennis, etc.) that they can do anywhere else--instead of enjoying what is unique about this state. If a person is going to come to Colorado, he or she should leave that junk behind and partake of what Colorado is REALLY about, instead of the phony-baloney yuppie stuff.
I'm curious to know what the activities are that make Colorado what it is. I mean, I moved here because the mountains are higher than the Green Mountains where I was previously living, so I could enjoy snowboarding, mountain biking, hiking, camping, etc. in (to me) better terrain. I haven't gone whitewater rafting in a while, but would love to take up kayaking at some point. I'm thinking the activities available that make Colorado what it is to be camping and hiking, since that seems to be a requirement to enjoy before moving here if you want any chance of fitting in, lol.

But I was already doing these things in another place as well. I would imagine the same would go for golf and such too, right? I mean, doing the things you love, but in a better / prettier / different environment? I'm not a fan of golf or tennis, but I would imagine they would be more entertaining while enjoying a beautiful view or a change in scenery if that's what you love to do.

What makes Colorado, Colorado to you?

To be honest, I find almost all resort towns that I visit to be a bit 'cartooney' (I like that description). That's part of what makes them resort towns, in my opinion. They have to go over-the-top to make things feel very vacation-y in order to make the visit more pleasant to the people that keep these towns in business. Take Vail, for instance. Going there in the winter is like stopping into a 'winter wonderland' when you see trees with every single branch meticulously decorated with lights at night, ice rinks in the main resort area of the town, banners and such advertising whatever is going on that day or week, etc. The first several times I went there, I felt like I was on vacation due to how cartooney the place felt. Same with Breckenridge. But that's the goal, right?

My brother wants to come visit this summer, and wants to spend a bit of time in Vail. He doesn't get into mountain biking, hiking, camping, etc. What does he want to do when he gets here?
...
He wants to play disc golf at Vail, because the course looks 20x more amazing than the ones he's used to playing on are. It's taking his favorite game, and adding a beautiful environment to it. Sure, I'm trying to convince him to take a zip-line or something with me, but we'll see how it goes.
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:47 PM
 
331 posts, read 869,069 times
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Just read the second link. Surely you don't think people would come to CO as a destination spot to drink and drive in a beat-down pickup?
You can do that anywhere.
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Old 04-08-2011, 07:01 PM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,075,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I stand on my original comment. Here is another voice who pretty much agrees--Denver Post columnist Ed Quillen. He the wrote the follwing back in 1987--not much has changed.

Tourism Leads To Degradation, Anyway

As far as the "tourist experience," Quillen had the right idea about that, too, back in 1988:

No Hope For The Traditional Tour
I don't think the OP was looking for a debate on what is a "real" Colorado town or "real" Coloradan is or what defines "proper" tourism or any other such minutiae.

What he seemed to be looking for was a good place to golf and enjoy outdoor music and some nice summer weather with things to do.

I just don't see the need why you felt you had to spam the thread with all this, as your response has nothing at all to do with the topic or what the poster was looking for. We already have plenty of depressing, dreary and negative threads regarding your POV.
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Old 04-08-2011, 07:17 PM
 
20,376 posts, read 37,929,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pyrotech View Post
.. Surely you don't think people would come to CO as a destination spot to drink and drive in a beat-down pickup? You can do that anywhere.
As amply demonstrated by Billy Carter years ago; driving around in a pickup, drinking beer and caterwauling with the 8-track.
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Old 04-08-2011, 07:33 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,178,099 times
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Colorado has two sterling things that make it unique:

First, it has some of the most magnificent alpine and desert geography in the world, some of it still relatively unspoiled.

Second, it has a magnificent historical heritage, from the Anasazi ruins to the the remnants of its mining era a century ago, along with farming and ranching heritage that blossomed about the same time.

Unfortunately, the modern incantation of "destination resort" tourism is doing its best to destroy both with the kind of "resort ghetto" sprawl that one-minute attention span, shallow modern tourists seem to need to feel "comfortable."

Theodore Roosevelt railed against the kind of tacky tourist development a century ago when he spoke of people's attempts to commercialize the Grand Canyon. He was right about that back then, and his comments equally fit Colorado's mountain areas:

Quote:
I want to ask you to keep this great wonder of nature as it now is. I hope you will not have a building of any kind, not a summer cottage, a hotel or anything else, to mar the wonderful grandeur, the sublimity, the great loneliness and beauty of the canyon. Leave it as it is. You cannot improve on it. The ages have been at work on it, and man can only mar it.
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Old 04-08-2011, 10:44 PM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,075,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Colorado has two sterling things that make it unique:

First, it has some of the most magnificent alpine and desert geography in the world, some of it still relatively unspoiled.

Second, it has a magnificent historical heritage, from the Anasazi ruins to the the remnants of its mining era a century ago, along with farming and ranching heritage that blossomed about the same time.

Unfortunately, the modern incantation of "destination resort" tourism is doing its best to destroy both with the kind of "resort ghetto" sprawl that one-minute attention span, shallow modern tourists seem to need to feel "comfortable."

Theodore Roosevelt railed against the kind of tacky tourist development a century ago when he spoke of people's attempts to commercialize the Grand Canyon. He was right about that back then, and his comments equally fit Colorado's mountain areas:
You must lie on a bed of nails at night. There is nothing wrong with being comfortable or enjoying comfort. I think what you mean is that it is ok to enjoy things that you see fit, but not how others see them.

The actual footprint of ski towns in Colorado is miniscule compared to the actual land area of Colorado. There is no sprawl, the total land area of Vail and related towns is a very tiny part of Eagle County, almost all of which is completely untouched.

What significant historical heritage has been destroyed by tourist towns? In fact some historical ghost towns like ******** and Independence have been preserved by the Aspen Historical Society.
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Old 04-10-2011, 09:08 PM
 
1,809 posts, read 2,914,255 times
Reputation: 2311
Thanks all for the contributions. I have heard a lot of extremely positive things about Sun Valley from the Idaho forum as well. That may be the front runner right now. Some posters are saying the forests are more dense and pristine there vs. CO.

Response to jazzlover:
...I read your comments. My questions and responses:
1. As other posters stated, golf done in a really pretty mountain setting is a lot different that at some big city public course
2. What would you suggest I do to "enjoy what is really unique about the state?"...I would think hiking would cover this pretty well
3. What would be some specific examples of "partaking what Colorado is really about"? Again I would think hiking would cover this pretty well.
4. Can you give me a list of what you think are "the few real towns left in Colorado"?

I hear what you are saying and definitely have an appreciation for non-resort rustic areas. My parents still live in (and I grew up mostly in) a really rural non-commercialized part of Vermont. And it can be nice to be in these areas at times. But they can also bore the crap out of me. If someone is single and not like 80 years old yet, it is nice to have some of the pizzaz and action some of the western mountain resorts offer if you are going to be somewhere for a month and are not a reclusive Buddhist monk And yes Sun Valley, Aspen and Telluride are certainly not some rustic off the radar town in Montana, but I would definately not put them in the same tacky touristy type class as say nasty places like Fishermans Wharf in SF or Disneyland LOL You have some access to fun social acitivies going on in these resort towns, yet still are right on the edge of some amazing wilderness.
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