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Old 04-09-2011, 02:56 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,103,855 times
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Well, first, Ralph Lauren's ranch, the Double RL, is located near Ridgway, not Durango. To Lauren's (actually Ralph Lif****z's--that's his real name) credit, at least he hasn't cut it up into a rural yuppie subdivision. It was part of the Marie Scott land holdings, sold after her death. She was one of the largest private landowners in Colorado before her death in 1979, owning around something like 100,000 deeded acres at one point. Read about her here:

Marie Scott - A Biography | TheFencePost.com


I met her once; she was friend of a merchant friend of mine and she was in his store one day when I went to see him. She was just as described in the article. Unlike the "posers" who have infested southwestern Colorado in the last 20 to 30 years--and are a large reason that prices are so high--Marie Scott was the "real deal," a real Coloradan.

As for Durango, it is another town that has turned into a "cartoon" since the "beautiful people" showed up. I've got a whole catalog of photos showing what Durango was like 40 or so years ago--before the Animas Valley was choked with yuppie subdivisions, before all the golf courses and crap showed up, before the town was continuous traffic jam in summer, and when you could buy something besides tourist garbage on Main Avenue. I won't bother posting those photos here because most people on this forum wouldn't "get" what I was talking about, anyway. The only thing that hasn't changed hugely since then is the railroad, and the NIMBY's are doing their best to chase it out of its home since 1881. Durango was one hell of a neat town back then. Too bad it all changed. More correctly, too bad that the kind of people living there changed.
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Old 04-09-2011, 03:05 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,527 posts, read 29,246,638 times
Reputation: 21264
Quote:
Originally Posted by j1n View Post
You could buy a 3 bedroom mobile home in Durango for less than $400/month in mortgage payments. If you're planning on being there awhile, this might be a good option. As your $$ grows, you could sell and upgrade. For me, that would be a no-brainer.
You have to PUT that mobile home somewhere. Parks are $300 - $400 per month and land prices are out of site (I believe you have to have 35 acres or more to drill a well).

Having lived in Durango for a time, I can tell you that it is overpriced. If you don't mind the drive, prices in Ignacio, Cortez and even Farmington are much more reasonable. The commute stinks in the Winter, though.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,259,830 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
. She was just as described in the article. Unlike the "posers" who have infested southwestern Colorado in the last 20 to 30 years--and are a large reason that prices are so high--Marie Scott was the "real deal," a real Coloradan.

As for Durango, it is another town that has turned into a "cartoon" since the "beautiful people" showed up. I've got a whole catalog of photos showing what Durango was like 40 or so years ago--before the Animas Valley was choked with yuppie subdivisions, before all the golf courses and crap showed up, before the town was continuous traffic jam in summer, and when you could buy something besides tourist garbage on Main Avenue. I won't bother posting those photos here because most people on this forum wouldn't "get" what I was talking about, anyway. The only thing that hasn't changed hugely since then is the railroad, and the NIMBY's are doing their best to chase it out of its home since 1881. Durango was one hell of a neat town back then. Too bad it all changed. More correctly, too bad that the kind of people living there changed.
Oh please. Just study the history of the area a bit and you'll soon realize the people living there back in the day were no more virtuous than those there now. They were just as avaricious and violent, if not moreso. People are people. Sometimes good, sometimes bad.
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Old 04-09-2011, 06:35 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,527 posts, read 29,246,638 times
Reputation: 21264
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I met her once; she was friend of a merchant friend of mine and she was in his store one day when I went to see him. She was just as described in the article. Unlike the "posers" who have infested southwestern Colorado in the last 20 to 30 years--and are a large reason that prices are so high--Marie Scott was the "real deal," a real Coloradan.

As for Durango, it is another town that has turned into a "cartoon" since the "beautiful people" showed up. I've got a whole catalog of photos showing what Durango was like 40 or so years ago--before the Animas Valley was choked with yuppie subdivisions, before all the golf courses and crap showed up, before the town was continuous traffic jam in summer, and when you could buy something besides tourist garbage on Main Avenue. I won't bother posting those photos here because most people on this forum wouldn't "get" what I was talking about, anyway. The only thing that hasn't changed hugely since then is the railroad, and the NIMBY's are doing their best to chase it out of its home since 1881. Durango was one hell of a neat town back then. Too bad it all changed. More correctly, too bad that the kind of people living there changed.
I think you have just nailed why I disliked Durango so much. (I would have included the students and mountain bikers as well. LOL)

20yrsinBranson
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Old 04-09-2011, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
118 posts, read 268,113 times
Reputation: 184
You two are just tiresome.

We all get it. One of you dislikes Durango, and the other seems to dislike anything but memories of 40 years ago.

Cartoon town? Beautiful people? And having students and mountain bikers is a demographic problem?!

Yeesh. My experience, every day (in the current decade) couldn't be more different than the crap you guys spew on a regular basis. Fortunately, neither of you live here and I do. I guess we've each chosen wisely.

Cheers.
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Old 04-09-2011, 07:29 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,103,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jchasse View Post
We all get it. One of you dislikes Durango, and the other seems to dislike anything but memories of 40 years ago.
What I detect in the post above is a total disregard for history--that only what one knows NOW is relevant or important. Aside from squandering our historical heritage--a historical heritage, by the way, upon which a good chunk of the Durango economy trades upon to sustain itself--such a view is the regrettable trait of far too many people today.

As George Santayana said so eloquently:

Quote:
Progress, far from consisting in change, depends on retentiveness. When change is absolute there remains no being to improve and no direction is set for possible improvement: and when experience is not retained, as among savages, infancy is perpetual. Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. In the first stage of life the mind is frivolous and easily distracted; it misses progress by failing in consecutiveness and persistence. This is the condition of children and barbarians, in which instinct has learned nothing from experience.
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Old 04-09-2011, 07:52 PM
Status: "Not politically correct" (set 22 hours ago)
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,543 posts, read 11,637,607 times
Reputation: 24197
Actually from what I've discovered $800.00 a month for a rental is pretty darn good. The $800.00 a month I was paying for a two bedroom "condo" in Ridgway was outrageous to me, but reasonable to everyone else here. If you want to appreciate the prices in Durango, look at rentals in Telluride or Mountain Village.
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,259,830 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
What I detect in the post above is a total disregard for history--that only what one knows NOW is relevant or important. Aside from squandering our historical heritage--a historical heritage, by the way, upon which a good chunk of the Durango economy trades upon to sustain itself--such a view is the regrettable trait of far too many people today.

As George Santayana said so eloquently:
Much of what people think of as the history of the area is a somewhat antiseptic version of reality. Things were pretty gritty back then, particularly in its earlier days. I'm sure the quality of life has increased substantially for the average resident, particularly with greater concern for the environment.It's still just a town of 14,000 in a county of 50,000, not exactly a megalopolis. Keep in mind a lot of the development you dislike was done by old timers looking to turn a buck. Nothing new about that.
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Old 04-09-2011, 08:38 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,576,178 times
Reputation: 1883
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
As for Durango, it is another town that has turned into a "cartoon" since the "beautiful people" showed up. I've got a whole catalog of photos showing what Durango was like 40 or so years ago--before the Animas Valley was choked with yuppie subdivisions, before all the golf courses and crap showed up, before the town was continuous traffic jam in summer, and when you could buy something besides tourist garbage on Main Avenue. I won't bother posting those photos here because most people on this forum wouldn't "get" what I was talking about, anyway. The only thing that hasn't changed hugely since then is the railroad, and the NIMBY's are doing their best to chase it out of its home since 1881. Durango was one hell of a neat town back then. Too bad it all changed. More correctly, too bad that the kind of people living there changed.
Well I guess I'll be one of those cartoon characters. Can't wait to live there. Everything is relative. When you come from gray cloudy PA to live in high desert, be 15 minutes from the mountains and numerous outdoor recreational opportunities, hundreds of sunny days every year, and low humidity, it's a pretty good swap.

40 years ago I was 17 and had lots of other things to keep me busy. Didn't even know there was such a thing as Durango, didn't care. Now history is important and as we well know, failure to learn from it can be fatal, but truthfully, like it or not, time marches on. People come, people go. All things change over time. Including Durango.

I've been there a number of times now but the only evidence I saw of "beautiful people" was a subdivision with a California style golf course north of town, and lots of $700-800K homes being short sold and/ or foreclosed on. Many "beautiful people" are gone. Makes for a nice buyers market there which I took advantage of to buy developed land.

So we can either try to live in the past or choose to live in the present & enjoy the beauty that Durango still represents. I choose the latter. In doing so I'll study & celebrate the history of Durango, as one should when you live someplace that unique. 4-5 more years, and that's where I'll be, and probably still reading Jazzlover's curmudgeonly commentary. So Jazzlover, keep up the fine work. You balance out the discussions with your contrarian views.
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Old 04-09-2011, 09:50 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,103,855 times
Reputation: 9065
Durango was still pretty "gritty" 40 years ago. Certainly, it is more materially comfortable now than it was then--that's true of most of America. Funny, though, how that comfort has really not made us happier as individuals or as a society.

Don't get me wrong, there are many things I like about the area around Durango--a climate that I personally like, some terrific history, and some of the most magnificent geography in Colorado nearby. What I don't like is that Durango culturally no longer feels like "real" Colorado. I'm not the only one with that view--I know a lot of former Durango residents, many of them natives, who have relocated away from there because they did not like what their home town has become.
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