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Old 08-17-2017, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Austin
140 posts, read 72,047 times
Reputation: 180

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
Or go back to being Illegal because many CO cities are a dump now with transients everywhere. And it smells like hell anyway.
Im not a user but I do know you cant fight popular demand. Thats what Texas keeps getting wrong. Its crawling with Mexican gangs and they're still making a majority of their profits from it. No, the only realistic route at this point is legalization. If you did that all those transients would disappear quite quickly because Colorado wouldn't stick out anymore. At least not in regards to pot
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Old 08-17-2017, 03:30 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,649 posts, read 64,111,757 times
Reputation: 68392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Let's Go Here View Post
I moved to Montrose from Durango o a year ago for a job promotion. For what I was paying in rent for a 1-bedroom apartment, I now have a 3-bedroom house with a big yard in a really nice neighborhood. Not only is housing ridiculous in Durango, but so are groceries, fuel, and other day-to-day things that people need to buy. The biggest problem isn't necessarily the high cost of living, it's the mediocre income levels.

An opportunity for me to move back to Durango came up a couple of months back but housing prices have skyrocketed and a house similar to the one I'm living in now would cost $1500+ in rent and my pay would have stayed about the same. NO. THANK. YOU.

Durango is a really nice place but these housing prices will eventually drive away the working-class folks, IMO. It's a town with California prices & Kansas wages.
So is Santa Fe, but people keep coming.
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Old 08-17-2017, 03:34 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,649 posts, read 64,111,757 times
Reputation: 68392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Let's Go Here View Post
About a month ago, a company offered me a job in Durango which I accepted after visiting the area. The company is going to pay me a nice salary ($45K to start), but the more I look, it seems like $45K in Durango is like making just above minimum wage in other places!

Seriously, I've been looking at apartments listed in the Durango Herald and on craigslist, and haven't found anything for under $650/month. I've found one apartment complex for $800 a month that seems like it wouldn't be bad, but it's located near Fort Lewis and allows students so I'm a little skeptical about it.

What is it that makes Durango so expensive though? I understand that it's a tourist town, but outside of the tourism and healthcare industries, it doesn't seem like there's anything that "drives" the city's economy. It's a beautiful city and seems like a great place to live, but at the same time, I don't think it's a city that people would die to live in.
The college is a significant employer. I know people who moved there from Seattle years ago, because it was so much cheaper, and they felt it was their dream place. Everything's relative.
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Old 08-17-2017, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,668 posts, read 1,666,689 times
Reputation: 2913
Quote:
Originally Posted by janeh777 View Post
Colorado mountain towns are expensive, as far as I know, its been that way for at least the last 125 years
Wages dont tend to match housing costs
Fixed it for ya. Anywhere there is something desirable, prices will reflect it. Otherwise, we'd see SLV prices everywhere.
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Old 08-19-2017, 08:52 PM
CTC
 
Location: Pagosa Springs, CO/North Port,FL
661 posts, read 1,153,788 times
Reputation: 572
was in Durango today. Mall was dead, downtown was hopping. Great lunch at the Steamworks-all kinds of people there today. Local young families (white and brown), tourists etc.
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Old 08-19-2017, 09:01 PM
 
1,071 posts, read 600,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Fixed it for ya. Anywhere there is something desirable, prices will reflect it. Otherwise, we'd see SLV prices everywhere.
But what is going on nationwide is that foreigners are finding American real estate a desirable investment, as are domestic flippers. Otherwise, we might be a functioning nation.

Anytime you have a lack of protectionist policies, the size of the American middle and working class's pocketbook will reflect it.

For god's sake, when will the traitorous property owner class grow themselves a semblance of a conscience? Does it occur to you people whatsoever the lack of disposable income across the country will hinder economic recovery efforts?
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Old 08-20-2017, 07:24 AM
 
193 posts, read 215,178 times
Reputation: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSR13 View Post
But what is going on nationwide is that foreigners are finding American real estate a desirable investment, as are domestic flippers. Otherwise, we might be a functioning nation.

Anytime you have a lack of protectionist policies, the size of the American middle and working class's pocketbook will reflect it.

For god's sake, when will the traitorous property owner class grow themselves a semblance of a conscience? Does it occur to you people whatsoever the lack of disposable income across the country will hinder economic recovery efforts?
Traitorous property owner class? People investing in the American Dream, participating in capitalism, employing workers, are deemed traitors? Laughable...
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Old 08-20-2017, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,668 posts, read 1,666,689 times
Reputation: 2913
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSR13 View Post
Anytime you have a lack of protectionist policies, the size of the American middle and working class's pocketbook will reflect it.
You're funny. History has shown that while protectionsist policies may create a sudden surge in domestic activity, they eventually lead to larger economic failure.
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Old 08-20-2017, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Austin
140 posts, read 72,047 times
Reputation: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSR13 View Post
But what is going on nationwide is that foreigners are finding American real estate a desirable investment, as are domestic flippers. Otherwise, we might be a functioning nation.

Anytime you have a lack of protectionist policies, the size of the American middle and working class's pocketbook will reflect it.

For god's sake, when will the traitorous property owner class grow themselves a semblance of a conscience? Does it occur to you people whatsoever the lack of disposable income across the country will hinder economic recovery efforts?
That's what people don't realize about the Chinese. They're guzzling down loads of our real estate under the wing of our national debt. But many people didn't take part in that debt and it tears me up to think all of our hard working retirees are getting completely thrown under the bus. We have plenty of vultures here already without foreign investors sucking up our resources but of course money always has the last say
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Old 08-21-2017, 09:40 AM
 
1,019 posts, read 988,719 times
Reputation: 655
Durango, like so much of the West, is not a rational real estate universe.


High percentages of Western households spend more than 50 percent of their income on housing. Source: Center for Housing Policy :

Durango is like a good portion of the West: unaffordable. In fact, according to a report put out by the Center for Housing Policy last month, the West is plagued with some of the highest share of working households with a “severe housing cost burden,” meaning they pay at least half of their income on housing. California’s the worst, with 32 percent of households under the severe housing cost burden, but Washington, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon and Colorado are all above the 20 percent mark. Not good.
With the exception of Bayfield, Dolores and Dove Creek, rents in Southwest Colorado are up to 45 percent higher than the fair market rents set by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The fair market rates take into consideration wages and income, and the expense of living within a particular county.

According to the index, Durango residents pay the highest rents in La Plata County, while Mancos residents pay the most in Montezuma County.
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