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Old 04-22-2011, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,607 posts, read 20,203,766 times
Reputation: 5311

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernjc3 View Post
The way I am managing my money currently, I will have ~$6,000.00 and (2) open lines of credit available to me for the move.
Not enough money. You should have a minimum of 6 months living expenses saved up, assuming you have family you can fall back on as a cusion. Otherwise, you should have 12 months of expenses. Other than when you first graduated, have you ever been unemployed before? For months? Do you know what it is like to go out looking for a job in this economy when you're unemployed, (and made even worse when you don't have any local connections on your resume)? I do, and trust me, it's not fun, it's not something you want to go through if you can avoid it.

It takes $$$ to be able to play in the mountains and go on trips. It takes money just to live-- even without doing anything fun. A restaurant job just ain't going to cut it for anything more than a temporary fix. What do you think your "career" prospects are in Denver/Boulder compared to DC, or compared to NYC?
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Old 04-24-2011, 12:17 PM
 
16 posts, read 14,083 times
Reputation: 38
First off, I'd like to thank everyone for taking the time to offer me their advice, encouragement, helpful warnings, and the warm welcome. I want to try and address what everyone has said because I've found each post useful in one form or another. I will try and keep it as succinct as possible.

Smdensbcs: "...life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness..." I think they were on to something. This is something that is really important to me and I more than prepared to work whatever job I need to to give me the best shot at staying. I have worked as far as I can remember doing everything under the sun; house repair/remodeling (siding, painting, decks, plumbing, etc.), selling peanuts and cracker jacks at Giants Stadium, washing dishes, and working as a barista at a coffee shop through most of college. A job is a job, simple as that.

I've already spoken with my friends and they completely understand that this is my number one priority. They were extremely supportive as well and said they have some contacts out there which is a plus. Switching gears; I am very good about meeting new people and making new friends. I went to college knowing nobody and moved to where I currently live knowing nobody, so making friends and networking are things I'm all too familiar with.

Idunn: I have toyed around with the idea of camping out for a while at a campground with bathroom facilities to save on money if it came to that. However, that would be a last ditch effort in an effort to stay there. I am planning to have enough money to last me 4 months without a job and my parents have offered their full support should I need it. They're not going to pay for me to live out there, but they said they would be willing to help me for a month if I would need it, so that would add a month on to whatever time-frame that I can last.

I'm not specifically looking to live in boulder, just using it as a reference point. Realistically anywhere within an hour north of Denver I would consider. While I'm looking to do plenty of climbing when I'm out there, that will be a lower priority initially until I get a somewhat stable foundation. I totally agree with you that "aiming for a particular area" while sometimes more difficult can be worth it in the long run. Initially my priorities will be focused towards finding a great location for me and making it work (no pun intended).

Proveick/CTC/Delta07: CAVA1990 is correct regarding my government work. To carlify, I am not a government employee; I work for a contractor to the government (Department of Defense). I have a Public Trust Security Clearance through Department of Justice, and currently my Secret Clearance is being processed for Department of Defense. In D.C. government work is responsible for 90% of the jobs and I have not had a particularly difficult time finding work in the area.

I am a Project Control Specialist managing two of my companies bigger projects. It's a fancy way of saying I manage the finances of these projects and advise pass on that information to the project managers so that they can make decisions. I deal heavily with most areas of the company (Accounting, Contracts, Business Development, Operations, Management). It's nice because it gives me a decent amount of experience doing everything.

Unfortunately, there is not much chance of a lateral transfer being that I am a contractor and not an employee of the government. I'm going to check with a friend I have in HR to see if our company has anything available out there, but I seriously doubt it.

Naturegirll: Thanks for the tips. I don't think the move will be to expensive for me. I rent currently and plan on selling anything that cannot fit in the car. Things that are important on keeping I will have my parents hold on to and ship to me when I get settled. Basically I'm planning on make a 2-day trip, possibly a non-stop trip, and camping along the way if I need to stop. I always have room for humble pie. I am no stranger to working odd or less desirable jobs to scrape by.

Vegaspilgrim: I don't completely disagree in that it may not be enough money, however, I don't believe there is a really a minimum in this situation. I don't have family to support, I have a great support structure from my parents, and am blessed enough to have a widespread network of business contacts. I have been unemployed and do know what it takes to get by without any certainty of when the next job will come around.

This past summer I had to go through that. With minimal savings I worked doing a bit of house sitting, painted apartments, as well as other odd jobs which worked out well. They didn't allow me to be care free, but they were fine for getting me by month-to-month. I market myself well, and I pick up on things very quickly which helps me tremendously finding work.

Ideally I will be able to avoid that situation altogether though. I've started applying for jobs out there, and while I don't expect to get anything until I move out there, it never hurts to throw out a few lines and cross your fingers.

Again, I really appreciate everything everyone has posted. It's allowed me to account for as much as possible before going through with this. I actually got some great news from my Father after speaking with my family about this move. It turns out one of his close friends does some consulting out there and has quite a few higher up business contacts. We're going to talk about it this week to see if he can get me in touch with some people out there. Thanks again!

Bern
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Old 04-24-2011, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,607 posts, read 20,203,766 times
Reputation: 5311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernjc3 View Post
Proveick/CTC/Delta07: CAVA1990 is correct regarding my government work. To carlify, I am not a government employee; I work for a contractor to the government (Department of Defense). I have a Public Trust Security Clearance through Department of Justice, and currently my Secret Clearance is being processed for Department of Defense. In D.C. government work is responsible for 90% of the jobs and I have not had a particularly difficult time finding work in the area.
If that's the case you should also be looking at Colorado Springs as well-- with security clearances you might have an advantage finding employment there. Don't limit yourself to just Denver and north of Denver. I would search for jobs up and down the whole front range and see where you land. Once you're already settled in CO, down the road it will be easier to pinpoint a specific location you want to be.
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Old 04-25-2011, 11:02 AM
 
10,875 posts, read 41,210,243 times
Reputation: 14020
You might want to get a copy of The Denver Post's front page article (4-24-11) ... "Slump hasn't stalled influx" ....

Where the demographics of the influx of new residents vs. the available jobs is discussed. Their numbers are 130,000 fewer jobs over the last couple of years, but at the same time 145,000 new residents moved in. Their projection is 10-20,000 new jobs this year, but also an additional 85,000 people moving to Colorado. So the projection is clearly a shortage of jobs, and the competition for even those jobs that a lot of folks wouldn't otherwise do is pretty fierce ... especially at the very low end pricepoints for unskilled type work.

OP, be prepared to have living expenses that exceed your ability to earn a living here ... which leads a lot of young, single people to live in shared housing/multiple roomates, and a standard of living which may be described as spartan. If you can accept that and count the outdoor recreation access as a bonus for your free time, you may be able to survive here ....
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Old 04-25-2011, 11:12 AM
 
331 posts, read 867,501 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
If you can accept that and count the outdoor recreation access as a bonus for your free time, you may be able to survive here ....
I like to think of it more as a "living the dream" lifestyle, and having work is an added bonus to be able to afford food and bills.

OP, I've been down the route of moving somewhere not knowing anybody, and just moving in with a group of fun people in Vermont that are just as into mountain sports / outdoor activities as I am. Sure, there were times we lived on Ramen noodles and the wonderful beans/cornbread combo, but we also got to go out biking and snowboarding just about every day. Then again, that was what I moved there for. I didn't move out there to start a career at the time. I moved there to enjoy the outdoors, "live the dream," and be where I wanted. I was able to find enough work to get by until I ended up landing in a city-like town. That's when I settled down a bit, got a steady job and went back to school, etc. I could still find time to get out and do the whole 'weekend warrior' thing, but it wasn't the same.

If you really want to move out and get stuck living a boring suburban life, then be sure to check out the front range and look for work that will eat up your life. If you're looking to go climbing several times a week, don't even consider Denver. You may end up living in a cheap run-down shack for the price you're looking to pay, or you may be able to find some cool roommates. But keep in mind, no matter what your goals are, you're going to have to sacrifice something. If you're wanting to go climbing a lot, you're going to have to work less and live cheaper. If you're wanting to get a career, you're probably going to have to climb less. Just decide what is more of a priority for you.
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Old 04-25-2011, 04:06 PM
 
808 posts, read 1,177,284 times
Reputation: 2074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernjc3 View Post
This is something that is really important to me and I more than prepared to work whatever job I need to to give me the best shot at staying. I have worked as far as I can remember doing everything under the sun; house repair/remodeling (siding, painting, decks, plumbing, etc.), selling peanuts and cracker jacks at Giants Stadium, washing dishes, and working as a barista at a coffee shop through most of college. A job is a job, simple as that.
Frankly, the only reason I pulled the ever-so-sneaky-but-true "moving is patriotic" card is because though it is generally a sound policy to line up employment before moving, there can be certain cases where it's neither practical, realistic, nor truly intended to further the best interests of the advice recipient. Many, many people who want/hope/aspire to move to Colorado are greeted (both in person and online) with negativity, I just wanted to be proactive and remind everybody you have a right to do whatever the heck you want, so long as you abide the law, etc. You remind me of myself from 15-18 years ago and I'm still here, still contributing to my community, still serving on local non-profit Boards, still walking up mountains, raising a (knock-wood) strong family (spouse is "native" CO at least) in a spectacular and affordable environment that would have been non-achievable in the region I was raised.

Are you guaranteed success? Obviously not. Might it be difficult? Of course. All I can tell you is what I'd tell my 25-year-old-self if I were having doubts (and I did) - be smart, be ready to work/struggle, but don't let the absence of guaranteed success stop you from making the effort. The potential upside far outweighs any potential downside. Anyway, the downside of letting yourself down by failing to make the effort is worse than the downside of it not working out in Colorado.
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Old 04-25-2011, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,465,200 times
Reputation: 9292
Bernjc3 wrote:
This is something that is really important to me and I am more than prepared to work whatever job I need to to give me the best shot at staying.
An attitude like this has am almost mystical power to attract good fortune and eventually success. It may not be an easy road, but in the end, you are likely to prevail. Best wishes!
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Old 04-25-2011, 05:18 PM
 
52 posts, read 106,483 times
Reputation: 129
smensbcs and CosmicWizard, both of you'll nailed it on the head. I do not know your ages, but I'll take it from the language that you'll used in your posts that I am considerably younger than you (I am 20 years old). I, very much like the original poster had it in my head that I was going to come and make my life in Colorado. However, in my case it was with an added degree of foolishness, I was determined to move after only my freshman year of college, in the summer of 2009, in the heart of the recession. Still, I was able to find work before moving out here, establish residency according to state law, and I am working and putting myself through the remaining 2 years of my education here at Colorado State University. Has it been easy? Have I had to work all kinds of menial jobs to get by? Yes, I have, but just as CosmicWizard so cleverly put it, it was the attitude of I was willing to do what it took to succeed. To the OP, are times out here tough just like the rest of the country, yes the are. But come out here with a dream and a realistic attitude and approach and be willing to do what it takes and odds are you will succeed. Best of luck to you.
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Old 04-25-2011, 07:26 PM
 
123 posts, read 215,653 times
Reputation: 73
Do it Bern...life is way too short...have you ever been on craigslist? there is always sublets, roommates wanted, rooms, etc... and there will be plenty in the areas you want to be in. I am 52 years old, been teaching in same school district for 28 years and I am going to SW Colorado for most of summer to explore and find place I want to live at (someday or sooner). If your moving before June 5th and need a place for a night you can stay with my wife and I in Moline, Illinois - right on interstate 80. You can make it from my place to Denver in 13/14 hours.....go with you want to do. You said it.....a job is a job ! Jerry
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Old 04-25-2011, 07:32 PM
 
123 posts, read 215,653 times
Reputation: 73
Also, you may want to check out Loveland....just south a bit from Fort Collins going towards Denver. I still cannot get over being in a full packed chick-fil-la eatery last summer. My wife says to me look at all the people and how happy they are. She was right, there was sooo many people and they were so happy..........Colorado is a great place !
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