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Old 05-05-2011, 09:14 AM
 
82 posts, read 177,618 times
Reputation: 69

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Frustrated or not, if you have a good job, I'd hang on to it. I can speak from experience that it is better to get your career started early than to be 'young and foolish'.
Once you have some experience and bragging rights on your work, then you might think about "moving out West".
Without knowing much about your situation in Virginia, I'd say you have access to more resources where you're at to do some of that Applacian hiking you mentioned.

Moving to a place at a point where you haven't enough of a career established to get the same type of work is pretty scarey to me. Colorado, while it may appear to be cheaper than Virginia and 'void' of traffic, is really not cheaper in terms of economics. There's lots of desire for people to move there and I think that creates fierce competition for even 'McJobs'. And, if you do decide to go this route, it'll be harder to move back into a career when you decide eating something other than ramen noodles, needing a car and the desire to live in something larger than something you spin your arms around in and touch walls plus having to share it becomes more important.

I don't know. I think it would be better to wait, get more of those secret clearances and more importantly get established in your career before mucking about in Colorado. I think it'll pay off in the long run.

It would suck to have to work two jobs out there and not be able to do the things you want to do which is the reason you want to move there in the first place. With a decent job, you can at least visit frequently. Besides, have you ever been in the traffic coming out of the mountains during the summer and ski season? It comes to a complete stop pretty often.
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Old 05-05-2011, 11:44 AM
 
16 posts, read 14,077 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by livinslv View Post
Frustrated or not, if you have a good job, I'd hang on to it. I can speak from experience that it is better to get your career started early than to be 'young and foolish'.
Once you have some experience and bragging rights on your work, then you might think about "moving out West".
Without knowing much about your situation in Virginia, I'd say you have access to more resources where you're at to do some of that Applacian hiking you mentioned.

Moving to a place at a point where you haven't enough of a career established to get the same type of work is pretty scarey to me. Colorado, while it may appear to be cheaper than Virginia and 'void' of traffic, is really not cheaper in terms of economics. There's lots of desire for people to move there and I think that creates fierce competition for even 'McJobs'. And, if you do decide to go this route, it'll be harder to move back into a career when you decide eating something other than ramen noodles, needing a car and the desire to live in something larger than something you spin your arms around in and touch walls plus having to share it becomes more important.

I don't know. I think it would be better to wait, get more of those secret clearances and more importantly get established in your career before mucking about in Colorado. I think it'll pay off in the long run.

It would suck to have to work two jobs out there and not be able to do the things you want to do which is the reason you want to move there in the first place. With a decent job, you can at least visit frequently. Besides, have you ever been in the traffic coming out of the mountains during the summer and ski season? It comes to a complete stop pretty often.
While I appreciate your advice and concern, I do not agree with your rationale. While I do believe that being "young & foolish" is... well foolish, I believe being you "young & adventurous" is completely different. There is a way to make radical changes in a smart way, maybe not easy, but you can definitely go about making changes safely if they are well though out.

While you may think that it would be "young & foolish" to leave a career where I am making great money for my age and relatively stable, I think it would foolish not to leave it. I have always told myself that if I am not happy somewhere or with something, then I should change it if it was within my means. So that's where I am now.

I would much rather work to do something I love in a place that I love (not necessarily saying it will be Colorado, but I won't find out unless I try it) and scrape by, than make great money in a place where I am miserable. I am sure that when I am married (if that happens) and when I have kids (if that happens) then my priorities will change, however, I have neither of the two. So now's the time to find out what makes me happy, even if it is at the cost of financial stability. As long as it is not hurting my future (credit-wise) then why not?

On a side-note, what I am doing now is by no means what I want as a career; I don't really know what I want to do. My Dad is retiring at 55 and worked his ass of to do so. We were pretty poor growing up and he did whatever he had to to get where he is today. However, the stress and misery that I have seen him go through in his "career" is not something I wish to repeat.

I plan to get every ounce of happiness I can squeeze out of this life and right now I have some catching up to do. I don't mean to seem harsh, but nobody is guaranteed to live until they're 85 and I don't plan on putting off anything that I can do now responsibly until tomorrow...

Rant over, :P

P.S. I know you mean well, I am just starting to realize that I don't think I'm a career oriented type person at least in this stage of my life. Work to live don't live to work!
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Old 05-05-2011, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Back in COLORADO!!!
840 posts, read 2,033,215 times
Reputation: 1377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernjc3 View Post
Hey guys, my name is Bern (short for Bernard) and I'm 25 and currently living in the D.C. area. I've been reading just about everything thread in this CO forum for the past 2 months and finally decided it was my turn to share my story and ask for some insight and advice. So here it goes, I'll try and keep it brief.

I was born and raised in NYC (Staten Island to be exact) until I went off to college at Virginia Tech; big difference, I know, but I loved it. After graduating in May 09' I quickly found a job in government contracting as a Project Controller in the D.C. area. I am currently at a different company from where I started down here, but I am getting tired of it.

When I originally graduated college I had big plans to move out west, or hike the Appalachian Trial all the way through. However, lack of funds and grown up responsibilities got the best of me and I joined the work force instead.

After going through an extremely rough breakup, I discovered my passion for climbing last year. I had always been interested in it but never actually followed through. I now climb 4-6 times a week and it's become almost an obsession but I love it. It's been the one hobby I'm truly passionate about and has helped me center myself as a person.

Recently I've been increasingly frustrated with my job (government work is extremely frustrating), the area, and just how things are in general and decided it was time for a change. So here I am, I'm taking the leap and went ahead and set a hard deadline to move in mid/late September. I have about $2,000.00 saved up currently w/ (2) lines of credit with no balance. The way I am managing my money currently, I will have ~$6,000.00 and (2) open lines of credit available to me for the move.

Right now I have a high school friend that lives in Boulder, and a contact in Denver that would be able to get me a job at a bar/restaurant they own should I need it. I'm headed to CO with or without a job but I'm hoping that I can have something lined up for when I head out there. My plan is to live either on the outskirts of Denver, Boulder, or anywhere in between. I am really open for anything within an hour north of Denver. I don't mind apartment living, I don't need anything fancy. Just in a decent neighborhood. I'm planning on looking for places in the range of $550-$750 range. 1BR or a house with roommates, both are fine with me although the former would be more preferable.

I am also saving for a big trip to Patagonia next year but most of that has already been planned/saved for. I'm will cancel that trip should I need to tap into that money because this move is really important to me. I really want to make it work.

Anyways this has already gone on way longer then I figured it would so hopefully you found it all worth the read. I'd love any insight or advice anyone has to offer.

Thanks!

Bern
Well, I'm a bit older than you, and one regret I have is not doing something bold and adventurous when I was young and unattached....

It sounds like you have a pretty good head on your shoulders and have thought this out to some degree, so I say, GO FOR IT!

If you don't, you'll regret it in the years to come.

At this point in your life, a failure in the endeavor of moving cross country (not saying you'll fail), is not catastrophe. You're young enough to bounce back, and you have relatively little to lose...

Good Luck!
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Old 05-05-2011, 12:43 PM
 
82 posts, read 177,618 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernjc3 View Post
While I appreciate your advice and concern, I do not agree with your rationale. While I do believe that being "young & foolish" is... well foolish, I believe being you "young & adventurous" is completely different. There is a way to make radical changes in a smart way, maybe not easy, but you can definitely go about making changes safely if they are well though out.

While you may think that it would be "young & foolish" to leave a career where I am making great money for my age and relatively stable, I think it would foolish not to leave it. I have always told myself that if I am not happy somewhere or with something, then I should change it if it was within my means. So that's where I am now.

I would much rather work to do something I love in a place that I love (not necessarily saying it will be Colorado, but I won't find out unless I try it) and scrape by, than make great money in a place where I am miserable. I am sure that when I am married (if that happens) and when I have kids (if that happens) then my priorities will change, however, I have neither of the two. So now's the time to find out what makes me happy, even if it is at the cost of financial stability. As long as it is not hurting my future (credit-wise) then why not?

On a side-note, what I am doing now is by no means what I want as a career; I don't really know what I want to do. My Dad is retiring at 55 and worked his ass of to do so. We were pretty poor growing up and he did whatever he had to to get where he is today. However, the stress and misery that I have seen him go through in his "career" is not something I wish to repeat.

I plan to get every ounce of happiness I can squeeze out of this life and right now I have some catching up to do. I don't mean to seem harsh, but nobody is guaranteed to live until they're 85 and I don't plan on putting off anything that I can do now responsibly until tomorrow...

Rant over, :P

P.S. I know you mean well, I am just starting to realize that I don't think I'm a career oriented type person at least in this stage of my life. Work to live don't live to work!
Let's agree to disagree about the career thing then! I'd rather be done at 55 myself. As it stands I'll be done at 60.

I will agree with you about living another day is not a promise that fate will keep.

Economic circumstances are different today than when I was 25. I've never seen things this bad this long.

But hey, you might get lucky and find something good right away. If not, sometimes I aspire to a simpler life; stocking shelves at Whole-foods or being a bell hop or janitor ain't so bad of a life.
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Old 05-05-2011, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
Reputation: 9287
I've never heard of ANYONE on their death bed wishing they would have devoted more time to their career. Live while you are alive, and lessen the possibility of wishin you'd have done this and that when you've got one foot in the grave. The words below are froma song by Tim Mcgraw, written to honor his dad Tug McGraw when he was dying of cancer.

Live Like You Were Dying...by Tim McGraw

I went skydiving
I went rocky mountain climbing
I went two point seven seconds on a bull named Fu Man Chu
And I loved deeper
And I spoke sweeter
And I gave forgiveness I'd been denyin'
And he said some day I hope you get the chance
To live like you were dyin'
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Old 05-05-2011, 12:48 PM
 
Location: CO
2,533 posts, read 5,817,246 times
Reputation: 3295
Some are risk takers, some are not. Some seek security and safety above all else, some take chances. Some choose balance.

Colorado is a place that many who crave adventure call home. If that is who you are, there's a good chance you'll fit in, and feel comfortable and at home, and manage to make it all work. Live your life.
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Old 05-05-2011, 03:31 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,017,909 times
Reputation: 7537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernjc3 View Post
While I appreciate your advice and concern, I do not agree with your rationale. While I do believe that being "young & foolish" is... well foolish, I believe being you "young & adventurous" is completely different. There is a way to make radical changes in a smart way, maybe not easy, but you can definitely go about making changes safely if they are well though out.

While you may think that it would be "young & foolish" to leave a career where I am making great money for my age and relatively stable, I think it would foolish not to leave it. I have always told myself that if I am not happy somewhere or with something, then I should change it if it was within my means. So that's where I am now.

I would much rather work to do something I love in a place that I love (not necessarily saying it will be Colorado, but I won't find out unless I try it) and scrape by, than make great money in a place where I am miserable. I am sure that when I am married (if that happens) and when I have kids (if that happens) then my priorities will change, however, I have neither of the two. So now's the time to find out what makes me happy, even if it is at the cost of financial stability. As long as it is not hurting my future (credit-wise) then why not?

On a side-note, what I am doing now is by no means what I want as a career; I don't really know what I want to do. My Dad is retiring at 55 and worked his ass of to do so. We were pretty poor growing up and he did whatever he had to to get where he is today. However, the stress and misery that I have seen him go through in his "career" is not something I wish to repeat.

I plan to get every ounce of happiness I can squeeze out of this life and right now I have some catching up to do. I don't mean to seem harsh, but nobody is guaranteed to live until they're 85 and I don't plan on putting off anything that I can do now responsibly until tomorrow...

Rant over, :P

P.S. I know you mean well, I am just starting to realize that I don't think I'm a career oriented type person at least in this stage of my life. Work to live don't live to work!
I moved to Vail in 1999 and I had an old 1988 car, $1200 to my name and not much else.

But the difference is I had a job that I started training for the day I got there, had housing lined up with deposit paid and had a plan.

It worked out good for me and funny enough some of the experience I got helped me get into the career I wanted all along.

I think you should consider the economic side of it. Personally if I was employed where I was, I would not move until I had secured employment. The economic of the western slope of Colorado is shifty and part of the issue is many people want to live there, but few can afford the costs or survive the economic tumult one goes through. A lot of the jobs are seasonal, so you end up working like a maniac when the weather is nice or agreeable and then don't have much work at all for a few months.

Without housing or a job lined up, I think you'll drain your savings fast and then get yourself stuck to where you wont be able to go anywhere else.

I think the way I would do it, is secure a seasonal resort summer job right now along with some employee housing. That will give you a base of income and a place to live for the summer to get your boots on the ground and then you can go from there.

Here is a good resource for such jobs:

Colorado Jobs | CoolWorks.com

The other option is to get hired for a job for ski season and do it that way if you can't leave now.
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Old 05-05-2011, 03:45 PM
 
16 posts, read 14,077 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
I moved to Vail in 1999 and I had an old 1988 car, $1200 to my name and not much else.

But the difference is I had a job that I started training for the day I got there, had housing lined up with deposit paid and had a plan.

It worked out good for me and funny enough some of the experience I got helped me get into the career I wanted all along.

I think you should consider the economic side of it. Personally if I was employed where I was, I would not move until I had secured employment. The economic of the western slope of Colorado is shifty and part of the issue is many people want to live there, but few can afford the costs or survive the economic tumult one goes through. A lot of the jobs are seasonal, so you end up working like a maniac when the weather is nice or agreeable and then don't have much work at all for a few months.

Without housing or a job lined up, I think you'll drain your savings fast and then get yourself stuck to where you wont be able to go anywhere else.

I think the way I would do it, is secure a seasonal resort summer job right now along with some employee housing. That will give you a base of income and a place to live for the summer to get your boots on the ground and then you can go from there.

Here is a good resource for such jobs:

Colorado Jobs | CoolWorks.com

The other option is to get hired for a job for ski season and do it that way if you can't leave now.
Thanks for the advice! The link to jobs you posted (the seasonal ones) is an amazing idea! I worked with my father growing up doing everything from cutting down dead trees on our property, to redoing decking/siding and a slew of other carpentry type jobs.

While I don't really plan on changing my schedule to leave in August (I'll have about 4.5 months worth of living expenses by then + moving costs), I do plan on applying to some of these jobs to get my foot in the door. It looks like a great way to get me into the area and have an income in the meantime. I've already applied as a Crew Leader at for this job.

I really appreciate the tremendous advice/tip!
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Old 05-05-2011, 04:11 PM
 
82 posts, read 177,618 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
I've never heard of ANYONE on their death bed wishing they would have devoted more time to their career.
Me neither cause I've only seen my grandmother die on hers but I have heard scores and scores say they wish they'd done better in their career in order to better provide for their families.

I've also heard some say they wish they had gone on an adventure but were glad they had their kids instead. (or whatever).
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Old 05-05-2011, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, CO
166 posts, read 357,819 times
Reputation: 288
My husband and I lived in CO 20 years ago and left for a great job in Detroit... ( I know!) Had a couple of kids in Michigan and only just last fall were able to come back West when the youngest finished high school. Before you start a family is the best time to get where you want to be....it's MUCH harder to relocate with a young family. Do it while you can! Best of luck and keep us posted
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