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Old 03-11-2008, 08:50 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,510,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shuffler View Post
Well, almost everybody...those CEOs and fund jockeys who led the charge on exploiting the housing market with mortgage-backed securities and hedge funds were still able to scuttle away with millions...
They'll be sucking down Pina Coladas in Aruba laughing about it...

 
Old 03-11-2008, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,492,358 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by JillBoBill View Post
My father's always told me that it's "all relative". If the cost of living is higher, the pay is usually higher to compensate. Otherwise, it'd be a town full of high paid professionals with no one to buy their services. I've lived in New York, California AND North Carolina and they ALL had income taxes. I'm shocked Texas doesn't, actually.
They make up for it in speeding tickets. Life is cheaper form me in CO!
 
Old 12-08-2009, 11:33 AM
 
2 posts, read 4,056 times
Reputation: 10
Default Dear Houston

Hello,
I am living in Colorado Springs but originally from Montgomery, Texas .... just outside of Houston. Your are absolutely right cost of living is very high here compared to Texas and there are very few jobs. My home in Montgomery was small but sold at $115,000. That same home here is $300,000. There is NO SAUSAGE up here if you like Chapel Hill. If you thought driving in the rain was hard on bad days in Texas....well up here driving in the snow is a 7 month ordeal and very very scary. I have a 4x4 and can dig myself out of snow but I slide like everyone else. People don't wave here when you get on the freeway, they barely say hello when you pass them on a sidewalk, you need a separate insurance policy for your windshield....turning on your defroster can crack you windshield. My license tags for my truck (2008) is $650.00 a year here and $60.00 in Texas. But .... it is beautiful... and that is it!
 
Old 05-29-2010, 02:32 PM
 
Location: mn
305 posts, read 862,322 times
Reputation: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
Try Orange County or Los Angeles County California. (just kidding....if you think Colorado is expensive...)


I work for a major aerospace company. For the same job in Southern California my pay would be a whopping 6.2% higher. I checked. The cost of living differences between Colorado and Los Angeles are a LOT more than the differences between Houston and Colorado. I also compared salaries between Houston to Colorado: Exactly the same.
Try Minnesota it is high on everything the taxes will kill ya. The only thing not taxed here is clothes but I'm waiting!!! I sure wouldnt know what its like to have no state tax. Wow what a deal!!
 
Old 06-04-2010, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Del Norte NM
529 posts, read 1,137,820 times
Reputation: 165
I wonder what the market is like on the Front Range for ME's. I know she can get a job almost anywhere as a nurse.
I think you should be prepared for lower salaries; everybody wants to move to Colorado and it is reflected in what you are paid especially in this economy.
If you use bankrate.com's cost of living calculator you'll find Denver is about 11% more expensive to live in. So that needs to be a factor if along with cuts in pay. If you actually take a cut in pay.
 
Old 06-04-2010, 03:56 PM
 
66 posts, read 211,407 times
Reputation: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrodionov View Post
Husband and I are looking at relocating to Colorado. We have visitng several times and are in love with pretty much the entire state, it seems. But here's the question, in all seriousness: How can anyone afford to live there? We are currently in Houston, where the cost of living is significantly less. Husband is a mechanical engineer with a good paying job. I am a registered nurse, but I currently don't work to stay home with the little ones. It seems like a decent house anywhere in Colorado is nearly cost-prohibitive for a solid middle class family, and then there is state income tax to boot. (Texas doesn't have state income tax.) Do jobs in Colorado pay more since the cost of living is higher? It seems that we will have to live in a smaller community to [i]possibly[i] afford anything, but we can't seem to locate good engineering jobs for hubby away from larger metro areas. Help! Does this move even seem possible?

I'm hoping to hear some good news....I really don't like Houston!!
Colorado (in general) has a less expensive cost-of-living compared to many other states in the United States. I really wonder why some people on this forum (Colorado forum) continuously harp on Colorado's "expensiveness"? Have they never lived in, heard of, or visited the truly expensive areas in the United States?

New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Honolulu, Anchorage, etc. are all far more expensive than nearly any place in Colorado. Of course Colorado has the expensive "resort town" of Aspen, but there are more expensive "resort towns" elsewhere in the United States. And "resort towns" are usually so tiny that they don't really even count in the big picture.

I guess since most of the states closely surrounding Colorado are quite inexpensive, these residents get surprised when they see a place nearby that is a little more expensive (Colorado), hence the posts on this forum about Colorado's "expensiveness".

Expensive or not, Colorado is still a beautiful state, so I am not trying to degrade it in any way. I may even move to Colorado some day. However, as far as "expensiveness" goes, I am just telling it like it is.

Last edited by Viper2; 06-04-2010 at 04:10 PM..
 
Old 06-04-2010, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,607 posts, read 20,181,666 times
Reputation: 5311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viper2 View Post
Colorado (in general) has a less expensive cost-of-living compared to many other states in the United States. I really wonder why people on this forum keep harping on Colorado's "expensiveness"? Have they never lived in, heard of, or visited the truly expensive areas in the United States?

New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Honolulu, Anchorage, etc. are all far more expensive than nearly any place in Colorado. Of course Colorado has the expensive "resort town" of Aspen, but there are more expensive "resort towns" elsewhere in the United States. And "resort towns" are usually so tiny that they don't really even count in the big picture.

I guess since most of the states closely surrounding Colorado are quite inexpensive, these residents get surprised when they see a place nearby that is a little more expensive (Colorado), hence the posts on this forum about Colorado's "expensiveness".

Expensive or not, Colorado is still a beautiful state, so I am not trying to degrade it in any way. I may even move to Colorado some day. However, as far as "expensiveness" goes, I am just telling it like it is.
The poster you responded to said he lives in Houston, which is indeed one of the cheapest big cities in the US. I think a lot of people from places like that are expecting to live in a huge house on a semi-rural or large lot suburban property, when they see the difference in $/sq ft, and the average sizes of lots/backyards in just about every city in the western US, rather than readjust their expectations about how much housing/space they really need, they assume they can't "afford" to live there. The other issue is jobs. It doesn't matter how "cheap" something looks on paper if you need to work and can't get a job within reasonable commuting distance that pays living expenses. Heck, you can buy foreclosed brand new homes within 70 miles of LA in the high desert for dirt cheap prices-- that doesn't mean it's logistically feasible to live there.
 
Old 06-04-2010, 08:41 PM
 
66 posts, read 211,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
The poster you responded to said he lives in Houston, which is indeed one of the cheapest big cities in the US. I think a lot of people from places like that are expecting to live in a huge house on a semi-rural or large lot suburban property, when they see the difference in $/sq ft, and the average sizes of lots/backyards in just about every city in the western US, rather than readjust their expectations about how much housing/space they really need, they assume they can't "afford" to live there. The other issue is jobs. It doesn't matter how "cheap" something looks on paper if you need to work and can't get a job within reasonable commuting distance that pays living expenses. Heck, you can buy foreclosed brand new homes within 70 miles of LA in the high desert for dirt cheap prices-- that doesn't mean it's logistically feasible to live there.
Thank you for finally explaining this in a sensible way instead of trying to pretend that Colorado is super expensive, like some do on this forum. Your explanation was good. At no point did you make up nonsense about Colorado being some kind of unattainable Shangri-la, like some do on this forum. I'm not sure if it's insecurity on their part or what, but it is silly to say the least. However, regarding commute time, everyone's opinion of a reasonable commute differs.

It is obvious that you realize that Colorado is far from being the most expensive state in the United States, but is not the absolute cheapest either.

Like I said before, Colorado is a great state, and someday my wife and I may move there ourselves. I am not trying to degrade Colorado in any way whatsoever. My wife and I are even going there on vacation.

However, despite what some on this forum claim, Colorado is not considered to be the absolutely most desirable place in the United States by the general public, this is mainly due to weather and lack of ocean frontage. It not the most expensive state either. When people say (or hint at) things like this, I think they are either completely clueless or are simply trying to keep people out of the Colorado by telling them that it's ridiculously priced and completely unaffordable. Claiming such things is just pure bunk, and such misinformation gives outsiders (those who don't live in Colorado) the wrong impression.

Last edited by Viper2; 06-04-2010 at 09:12 PM..
 
Old 06-04-2010, 09:19 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,014,998 times
Reputation: 7537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viper2 View Post
Thank you for finally explaining this in a sensible way instead of trying to pretend that Colorado is super expensive, like some do on this forum. Your explanation was good. At no point did you make up nonsense about Colorado being some kind of unattainable Shangri-la, like some do on this forum. I'm not sure if it's insecurity on their part or what, but it is silly to say the least. However, regarding commute time, everyone's opinion of a reasonable commute differs.

Like I said before, Colorado is a great state, and someday my wife and I may move there ourselves. I am not trying to degrade Colorado in any way whatsoever. My wife and I are even going there on vacation.

However, despite what some on this forum claim, Colorado is not considered to be the absolutely most desirable place in the United States by the general public, this is mainly due to weather and lack of ocean frontage. It not the most expensive state either. When people say (or hint at) things like this, I think they are either completely clueless or are simply trying to keep people out of the Colorado by telling them that it's ridiculously priced and completely unaffordable. Claiming such things is just pure bunk, and such misinformation gives outsiders (those who don't live in Colorado) the wrong impression.
Well Viper you haven't even visited Colorado yet, nor have you lived there, so once you have why don't you tell us all about it then.

It would be like me proclaiming to state exactly how life is in Washington State when I have spent all of 2 days there.

Colorado is a desirable place to live, most people in Colorado now don't have long term ties to the state like I do which indicates a high number of people coming from elsewhere.

Again it all depends on where you want to live in the state. Certain mountain parts of the state are highly desirable and yes they are extremely expensive and it's competitive. A place like Denver for instance is a whole different place and I don't think it's the bargain it used to be, but it still has a good quality of life.
 
Old 06-04-2010, 09:19 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viper2 View Post
Thank you for finally explaining this in a sensible way instead of trying to pretend that Colorado is super expensive, like some do on this forum. Your explanation was good. At no point did you make up nonsense about Colorado being some kind of unattainable Shangri-la, like some do on this forum. I'm not sure if it's insecurity on their part or what, but it is silly to say the least.

It is obvious that you realize that Colorado is far from being the most expensive state in the United States, but is not the absolute cheapest either.

Like I said before, Colorado is a great state, and someday my wife and I may move there ourselves. I am not trying to degrade Colorado in any way whatsoever. My wife and I are even going there on vacation.

However, despite what some on this forum claim, Colorado is not considered to be the absolutely most desirable place in the United States by the general public, this is mainly due to weather and lack of ocean frontage. It not the most expensive state either. When people say (or hint at) things like this, I think they are either completely clueless or are simply trying to keep people out of the Colorado by telling them that it's ridiculously priced and completely unaffordable. Claiming such things is just pure bunk, and such misinformation gives outsiders (those who don't live in Colorado) the wrong impression.
What I said is that Colorado does not have a particularly good affordability index--e.g. local incomes as related to local living expenses. There is plenty, and I mean plenty, of statistical data to support that. Is it the worst place in the US in that regard? No. If you are coming from one of those places, then Colorado might look pretty good. But there are plenty of places with a better affordability index than Colorado has.

There is an old saying that was used for years in promoting Colorado, "'Tis a privilege to live in Colorado." That it is, but you pay for it either in foregone income, less career options and/or stability, or higher living expenses compared to many, many other places in this country.

If anybody does not believe that, then he or she can come to any of dozens upon dozens of Colorado towns where a $10/hour job is considered a prime job, and the median home price is over $200,000, sometimes way over $200,000--and see the economic difficulties that is creating for people.

I would add that people who have not spent ONE DAY living in the Colorado economic environment might just know a little less about it than people who have spent DECADES living and working in it.
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