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Old 08-26-2011, 08:06 PM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,049,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
All true.

Most of we natives and long-timers in Colorado know of "secret places" in the state where we can go and see almost no one and still enjoy some solitude and gorgeous places. The rub is that those places are that way because they are usually far off of the beaten track, lack most "amenities" that the typical tourist wants, and may be quite difficult to access by vehicle. If they weren't all of those things, then they would be overrun. As an example, I'm headed to one of those places in not too long (actually on my way to some business elsewhere). When I was through there not too long ago, I drove nearly 40 miles through some gorgeous backcountry without seeing another vehicle along a route next to some absolutely prime fishing. Typically, the local ranchers in the area are pretty suspicious of outsiders, but I've been knocking around there for 40 years, so I'm kind of a known quantity to a lot of them. I know a number of places like that around rural Colorado, but four decades of traveling around the rural parts of the state, often on business, has given me local information and connections that many Colorado residents and most all outsiders and newcomers just do not have and probably never will.
That's the thing, there is a huge swath of Colorado that is empty, but getting out to it is the challenge.
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Old 08-26-2011, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,922,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
That's the thing, there is a huge swath of Colorado that is empty, but getting out to it is the challenge.
Just go out. It's easy to find access roads and follow them out to the middle of nowhere.
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Old 08-29-2011, 04:18 PM
ndk
 
Location: Estes Park
68 posts, read 263,406 times
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I'd be out of Estes Park in a heartbeat because of the insane hordes of tourists in the summer and the wind in the winter, but I can't leave for a couple personal reasons. My wife wants to be close to the Front Range, and she doesn't like air conditioning, which means we have to stick to the mountains. That leaves very little from which to choose.

I'm trying to convince her that being a few more hours from Denver and not next to a world-renowned Park would be a blessing, not a curse...
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Old 08-30-2011, 12:45 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,848,135 times
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Wink Beyond Estes Park

If one needs to be near a town of a certain size for employment or other reasons, then options quickly narrow.

If more flexibility in such things, then the world expands. Allenspark is an example. It is about as close to RMNP as Estes Park, if without the same ease of access. But distinctly smaller, without most of the services of EP -- and without most of the tourists as well. In fact, most of them probably have no clue where it is, or much interest if they did. Proximity to Lyons and the front range is about the same as from EP, but without the same ease if headed to Loveland or Fort Collins. All in all a charming place which in certain aspects could well be termed rustic.

There is a good reason why Estes Park is where it is, and as popular. It is very well situated in one of the loveliest locations about, and, being no small thing, with both the Fall and Big Thompson rivers flowing through the center of town. A place like Allenspark, if lovely in its own right, cannot offer that. Nor the ease of access directly into Rocky Mountain National Park. It is very much a double-edged sword of a proposition, with a quite desirable area in which to live, assuming the costs can be borne. With decidedly one of them, aside from economics, all the many others in this world who wish to experience it as well. That is the blessing and curse of many beautiful areas, and surely of most any resort town.

The winds can be pronounced at times in the winter, and perhaps seemingly all the time if in certain locations. But any familiarity with Estes Park reveals it as anything but largely flat, with a variety of disparate neighborhoods. As strange as it can seem, of other possibilities as well, some areas closer to the Park, and the wind flowing down from its peaks, are actually far calmer than in town proper. The same can be said for tourists, who reliably congregate in certain sectors, and just as commonly fail to appear much in other spots. Which serves as understatement, as in some places, even close to the CBD, one possibly more likely to meet a bear than two-legged animal.

Or one could decamp to Ferncliff, which should reliably see fewer tourists than Allenspark. But between there and EP there are the occasional dirt driveways forking off the paved road. Most visiting Estes Park will never see CO 7 to begin with, although still a certain reliable contingent in summer. Some may happen to notice one of these hidden driveways soon lost in the woods as they pass to points beyond.

But not one will venture to the hidden home beyond, and peace and quiet it enjoys in isolation.
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Old 11-14-2011, 03:16 PM
 
122 posts, read 145,914 times
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You went to a major tourist attraction on the biggest holiday weekend of the summer and you were appalled at all the people? I'm sure they were appalled at you too.
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Old 11-14-2011, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
2,395 posts, read 4,169,033 times
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That's like saying I'm looking for less crowded areas in the USA than Manhattan
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Old 03-28-2012, 11:36 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 607,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snikt View Post
That's like saying I'm looking for less crowded areas in the USA than Manhattan
Well I naively went and didn't know how busy it would be!
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Old 03-29-2012, 09:22 AM
 
Location: SE Portland, OR
1,167 posts, read 2,145,940 times
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Come from Nebraska, the best option for you would be to go to either the Snowy Range in WY, or up the Poudre river (via Fort Collins). Outside of the 4th of July (which is busy everywhere) you will find a lot less people in these areas. Get a good atlas from DeLorme that will have all the backroads on it and and start exploring.

I really disagree that you have have to go to Gunnison. There is a ton of not very popular areas up the Poudre and up near Cameron pass (and on the other side).
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Boulder
31 posts, read 54,128 times
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Remember also that RMNP is free on national holidays, making the crowds in Estes over July 4 weekend that much worse.

"Regarding the hiking, most trails thin out substantially once a couple miles away from the trailhead or campground. And that goes for the RMNP area too."

Very true, I had Mills Lake and the Loch -- both extremely popular hikes -- nearly to myself last weekend, and on a warm sunny day at that. Lots of hikers the first 1/2 to 1 mile, very few the last mile.
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Ned CO @ 8300'
1,993 posts, read 4,190,783 times
Reputation: 2767
Quote:
Originally Posted by DallastoCO View Post
Remember also that RMNP is free on national holidays, making the crowds in Estes over July 4 weekend that much worse.
RMNP is not free on July 4 or other holidays except Veteran's Day weekend. Free admission days for 2012 are:
Rocky Mountain National Park - Fees & Reservations (U.S. National Park Service)
  • April 21-29
    National Park Week
  • June 9
    Get Outdoors Day
  • September 29
    National Public Lands Day
  • November 10-12
    Veterans Day weekend
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